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April 22, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Y, APRIL 22, 1931

TTHE MICHIGAN DAICY.

..:r k _,
...

WEBLING PLAIS
CAMP FORMULATED11
Architect's Plan 'ill Enable
Reconstruction to Begin
immediately.
WILL REOPEN JUNE 27
Fleischman States Regular Camp
Program Will be Carried
Out This Summer.
Reconstruction of the National
Shakespeare Memorial camp at
Charlevoix will commence immedi-
ately, according to an announce-
ment made yesterday by Earl
Fleischman, of the speech depart-
ment, director. The camp was re-
cently entirely destroyed by fire,
and an investigation is in progress
to determine the causes.
"New architectural plans worked
out for the camp will be started at
once," he said, "and it will be ready
in time for the opening on June 27.
The new camp will offer an oppor-
tunity to put into effect the plans
which had been previously worked
out for later adoption. The build-
ings will all be of uniform design,
and special attention will be paid
to the particular needs for thea-
trical purposes."
Festival Date Set.
Fleischman also announced that
'the Camp Festival Celebration will
take place August 20-23. Each night
will be designated as a particular
night for residents of various neigh-
boring towns, and performances o
"Midsummer Night's Dream" will be
given. Special arrangements are
pendifig for special trains from
Chicago and Detroit to accommo-
late those who wish to attend ,the
productions in this period, which
Neill be an opportunity to visit and
inspect the camp.
1 World's Fair Program Planned.
The first, national Shakespeare
/Memorial competition will be held
in Chicago in connection with the
World's Fair. Fleischman has been
commissioned by the committee in
charge to formulate a complete
rogram in the field of drama for
the Fair, with this competition as
the central feature. It is planned to
present the first Memorial company
during the Fair.
Plans are also pending for send-
ing a comp ny to the Traverse City
sherry festial this summer from
"he camp, s well as a Charlevoix
production .for the residents as
eatures of the summer program.
WERMAN MACNEIL
TO ATTEND SHOW
&culpture Exhibition Will be
Held April 26, 27.

STUDENT
HEALTH
"Why Don't Doctors Do Something,
About Colds?"
John V. Fopeano, M. D.
There can be no doubt that the
greatest obstacle to doing some-
thing about colds is the unwilling-
ness of the public to pay the price'
for riddance from such a contemp-
tible disease. Even if there were
available an immunizing agent as
efficient in preventing colds as vac-
cination is efficient in preventing
smallpox, there would still be mil-
lions of colds, because most peoplel
look upon a cold as too contempti-
ble to deserve any consideration.
There are few diseases that re-
spond so quickly to rest in bed, and
yet it is the exceptional person who
will consent to carry out even this
simple procedure. Most do not con-
sider it worth while.
Society fosters a attitude of con-
tempt towards colds. If a person
has chickenpox he becomes ostra-
cized and, at great expense to him-
self and to society, is isolated until
the danger of contagion is long
since past; but the common cold,
which is quite as infectious and as
serious in its consequences, is ignor-
ed. The afflicted person is allow-
ed, and often even compelled, to
carry on his regular duties under
conditions which demand intimate
contact with other persons. Under
such a policy no infectious disease
can ever be controlled.
No attempt is made to conserve
the natural protective mechanism
of the body. "Catc..hing a cold" de-
pends, among other things, upon
the inability of the body to mobil-
ize its defense against infection.
Surely fatigue is one of the most
important factors in destroying this
defense mechanism. College stu-
dents are notorious for their disre-
gard for any sane schedule for
sleep. It is smart to 'burn the mid-
night.' There are instructors who
derive a kind of sadistic pleasure
from the worn appearance of their
classes after unreasonable assign-
ments that necessitate exhaustive
effort on the part of all but the'
most brilliant. The, gospel of the
big muscle is taught with much ef-
1;- - ---

TEACHERS TO HAVE
NEW TYPEOF TEST
Undergraduates to be Told Type
of Exanination, Subjects
to be Covered in It.
The School of Education is try-j
ing a new experiment with the can-
didates for the teacher's certificate
of June, 1931.
For the first time they are tell-
ing the undergraduates the sort of
examination that they are going to
have and the subjects that they
will be held responsible for and ex-
amined upon.
A mimeographed pamphlet has1
been distributed to the School of

I DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I ~"' SITS AlREPAIRING

(Continued from Page 8)
class tournament. First game on
Thursday at 5:15, Ferry Field. Sign
notice on bulletin board to play.
Sigma Xi Members: The annual
banquet will be held at the Michi-
gan League, Monday evening, April
27. All members desiring to attend,
who have not received a notice by
mail, will please notify me before
Friday. Byron A. Soule, sec'y.
Observatory Journal Club will
meet Thursday afternoon at 4:15
in the class room of the Observa-
tory. Mr. Orren Mohler will report
on the paper "Light Distribution in
Elliptical Nebulae" by Dr. Paul ten
Bruggencate.

7:30 p. m., Thursday, room 445, W.
Engineering building.
Phi Sigma meeting in room 1139
Natural Science bldg., at 7:30 p. m.
Thursday Dr. J. W. Christ, of the
Horticulture Dept., of Michigan
State Teachers College, will give
the address of the evening. Dr.
Christ is an exchange speaker from
Theta Chapter of Phi Sigma.
Wyvern: It is important that
every member be present at the
Concourse of the League from 4-
5:30 p. m., Thursday, April 23.
Senior Ball Committee will meet
in room 306 of the Michigan Union
at 7:30, Thursday night. Very im-
portant business will be taken up,
and all members of the committee
are urged to be present.
Newcomer's Section of the Fac-
ulty Women's Club: Mrs: Samuel T.
Dana is giving a tea for all New-
comers in her home, at 2031 Hill
Street, Thursday afternoon, Apr. 23,
from 3 to 5:30 o'clock.
L-

Education students telling them Colloquium in Applied Meehan-
that they will assemble at nine ics: Messrs. Sherlock and Stout will
oclock' on May 2, to receive further present a joint paper on "The De-
instruction concerning the examin- velopment of an Electrical Record-
ations and will be assigned at that ing Anemometer for use in the
time to rooms. Study of Wind Gusts." There will
The purpose of the comprehen- also be a review of periodicals at
sive examination Dean James B.
Edmonson, of the School of Edu- Goodrich to Discuss
cation, said, is to throw light on the
extent to which present require- Socialist Movement
ments for the certificate give a
well-rounded acquaintance w i t h Prof. Carter Goodrich, of the eco-
the administrative and instruction- nomics department, will speak to
al problems; and to find how well students interested in Socialism on
students have integrated their var- Wednesday night in room 302 of
ious courses in education. the Union, under the auspices of
the Student Socialist club. His sub-
fectiveness but one hears little of ject will be "Socialism in the United
health saving virtue of sufficient States and Australia."
regular sleep. Professor Goodrich will tell why
Another factor in destroying the the Socialistic movement progress-
efficiency of this defense mechan- ed farther in Australiathan it did
ism is the lack of common sense in the United States and also why
the matter of dress and exposure. it has not progressed farther in
Little attention is given to heat and Australia.
moisture conditions of rooms. Most - -_------
fraternity members sleep, all to-
gether, in damp, unheated attics
where they are exposed to free mu-
tual exchange of discharges from S
the nose and throat.
What can the doctor do then-
if the patient treats his cold with
contempt, if he can't or won't obey 8 1
the principals of treatment used in
all other infectious diseases, if so-
ciety doesn't care, and if the indi- I M
vidual cares so little that he lets certs
down the natural barriers to dis-
ease and says, "come on in." (No Admission Charge)

PRESEN'TING

FINER FLOWERS
ALWAYS
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FLORISTS, INC.
Muriel Zink, Mgr.
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Phone 6215
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THELMA NEWELL, Violinist,
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist, Fac-
ulty concert, Sunday, April 26,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
KATE KEITH FIELD, soprano,
in Senior Recital, assisted by
T h e I in a Newell, violinist and
Louise Nelson, pianist, Tuesday
afternoon, April 28, 4:15, Men-
delssohn Theatre.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Faculty Concert, Wassily Besekir-
sky, Violinist, Hanns Pick, Violon-
cellist, Joseph Brinxman, Pianist,
Sunday, May 3, 4:15, Mendels-
sohn'Theatre.
RAYMOND MORIN, -Pianist,
Student's Recital, Tuesday, May 5,
8:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, James
Hamilton's class will present
scenes from "Aida," Wednesday,
May 6, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, Students
of Nora Crane Hunt, Voice,
Thursday, May 7, 8:15, School of
Music Auditorium.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist,
in Organ Recital every Wednes-
day, 4:15, Hill Auditorium unless
otherwise announced.
Festiv al
Hill Auditorium, May 13, 14, 15,
16.
Tickets (6 concerts) $6.00, $7.00,
$8.00.
FIRST CONCERT, Lily Pons, So-
prano; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Wednesday Evening.
SECOND CONCERT, "St. Francis
of Assissi" by Pierne. Hilda Burke,
Soprano;Eleanor Reynolds, Contral-
to; Frederick Jagel, Tenor; Nel-
son Eddy, Baritone; Fred Patton,
Bass; The Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra; The University Choral
Union, Earl V. Moore, Conductor,
Thursday Evening.
THIRD CONCERT, "Old Johnny
Appleseed" by Gaul. Hilda Burke,
Soprano; Eleanor Reynolds, Con-
tralto; Palmer Christian, Organ-
ist, Orchestral accompaniment;
Children's Festival Chorus; Eric
Delainarter and Juva Higbee,
Conductors, Friday afternoon.
FOURTH CONCERT, Ignace
Jan Paderewski Pianist; Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, Frederick
Stock, Conductor, Friday Evening.
FIFTH CONCERT, Ruth Breton,
Violinist; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-

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On sale at Calkins-Fletcher,
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Broadway Pharmacy. Only
one dollar a jar.
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