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April 09, 1931 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-09

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Irl THURSDAY, APRYL 9, 1931

THE'MTCHIGAN

1) ATUY

~n~URSI3AY. APThIL 9. 1931 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

004 MrAWOOMMOMW

PRESIDENT E IS
STREUOUB RDA
OF SPECH IflUS
Hoover Will Deliver Eight Talks
in TwAo Months; Subject of
Addresses Unknown.
TO DEDICATE MEMORIAL
Will Review G.A.R. Encampment
at Columbus; to Speak I
Before Democrats.
WASHINGTON, April 8-(IP)-Re-
freshed by his Caribbean sea voyage
-his second scant vacation in two
years of terrific strain --President
Hoover faces a strenuous spring and
summer.
A speech - making progam of
eight addresses within about e ht
weeks is to begin April 13, while
other speeches may be added to his
summer calendar.
Faces Many Issues.
Few presidents starting on the
last half of their terms have been
beset with more perplexing eco-
nomic issues or more formidable
political obstacles.
Outstanding national emergencies
include the growing deficit in gov-
ernment f u n d s, augmented by
shrinking income tax returns, the
problem of some ,000,000 unem-
ployed, and the farm situation, with
a slumping wheat market and a
prospective carry-over of more than
200,000,000 bushels in the face of
an approaching crop.
To Address Political Meeting.
Whether Mr. Hoover will discusst
any of the major problems or an-
swer the attacks of democratic and
independent adversaries in hisI
forthcoming speaking tour is prob-
lematical, Only one of the meet-
ings will be of a political nature,
that of the republican state edi-c
torial association at Indianapolis I
June 15.
In the congressional elections in
ndiana last fall, the democrats
"Won six seats from republican in-
cumbents in the house. The presi-3
dent -also will speak in Ohio and
Illinois, where democrats were vic-
torious in congressional elections.
To Speak at Marion.
He will dedicate the Harding me-~
morial at Marion June 16, and re-,
view veterans of the Grand Army
of the Republic in annual encamp-
ment at Columbus, and June 17 he
will dedicate the Lincoln memorial
at Springfield, Ill.
Iour of Mr. Hoover's speeches
will be delivered in Washington.
The national Red Cross meeting,
April 13; Pan-American day April
14; international chamber of com-
merce May 4; fiftieth anniversary
of the Red Cross May 21.
President Hoover also will de-
liver the Memorial day address at
Valley Forge May 30.
architectural School
Faculty Will Travel
Prof. Emil Lorch, head of the
architectural college, and Prof.
George M. McConkey, of the archi-1
tectural school faculty, will attend
the convention of the American In-
stitute of Architects in San Anton-
io during spring vacation, it was
announced yesterday.
While there, they will also attend
the meetings of the Associated Col-
legiate Schools of Architecture and
the National Council of Architec-
tural Registration Boards.

Coiirt Denes Fall's Appeal; Affirms
Sentence of Blackmer for Contempt
Associated Press Phot1
The appeal of Albert B. Fall (left), former interior secretary, from|
a sentence of one year in jail and a $100,000 fine for accepting a bribe
was denied by the District of Clumbia court of appeals. At the same
time the court affirmed the conviction of Harry M. Blackmer (right)',
who was fined $60,000 for contempt of court in refusing to return from
France to testify in the oil trials of Fall and Harry F. Sinclair. 1

ig
Southern States Lose Heavily
in Livestock; Menaces
Lives of People.
CLARKSDALE, Miss., April 8.-(/P)
-A Plague of buffalo gnats today
wrought havoc in the Mississippi
river lowlands of the state, Arkan-
sas and Louisiana, killing livestock
and menacing the lives of people.
Hlarris Barnes, Coahoma county
farm agent, said he had received
Aeorts of the death of 115 mules
in the county within 48 hours from
the pest. More than 100 mules have
been reported killed in Arkansas
and many head of livestock in Lou-
isiana.
Authorities issued a warning to
people to avoid .gnats, and live-
stock men are using every means
to protect their cattle. The gnats
arrive in swarms like cloud.s and,
settle on deserted houses in out-
lying sections as well as on barns
and herds of cattle.
Veterinarians throughout t h i s
area are now administering to
stricken stock.

CH ANCELLOR BATT L
AS APRIL 14, 'BL
Britain Breathes More Easily
as Snowden Recovers

FS ILL
yDGET

HE ALTI
DAY, N

EAR

SCREW SAVED FflOR

From Cystitis.
LONDON, April 8. -(:P)- Britain
breathes a little more easily nowl
that frail, crippled Philip Snowden
is emerging from his bouts of pain
and suffering against afflictions of
cystitis.I
Sympathy rose above party poli-
tics while the chancellor of the
exchequer fought his old enemy, ill
health, aided by Mrs. Snowden, his
staunchest ally.
No national crisis would have oc-
curred had Snowden failed to re-
cover completely by "Budget day,"
April 14, for the nation's $4,000,000,-
000 balance sheet could be an-
nounced either by the prime minis-'
ter or by a deputy chancellor.
But a Laborite budget would lose
much picturesque popular appeal
without the canny little Yorkshire-
man scrapping with his critics in
the house of commons.
Ordinarily in the rough and tum-
ble of politics the Laborite guardian
of the British national purse asks
for no quarter and gives non.
But in his unequal struggle for'
health, Snowden at 66, still a giant
of inteligence in finance and ec-,
nomics, is but a vulnerable scrap cf
crippled humanity fighting odo s:
that would dismay a personalit /
without his iron will.
Two months ago influenza left
Snowden with the painful internal.
inflammation known to physicians
as cystitis. His slow recovery has
served to bring to public attention
again the career of the man Who is
second only to his chief, Ramsay?
MacDonald, in the conduct of thew
affairs of the British empire.
As a youth he was seriously in-
jured in a bicycle accident and,
while stretched on an invalid's bed
he used the enforced leisure to

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UIIIIIIIU UUIIUUIULII
San Lucas Attracted by Signal
From Waterlogged Vesel;
Ship Abandoned.
IEUREKA, Calif., April 8.-(/P)-
E Capt. S. E. Mattson and his crew
of 17 were aboard the freighter San
Lucas today while his little steam
a umber schooner Cleone was aban-
doned to the seas near Blunt's reef
lightship, south of Eureka.
The Cleone, which left Eureka
Tuesday for San Francisco, sprang
a leak and soon became waterlog-
ged. She displayed distress signals
and the San Lucas, standing by,
picked up the men when they a-
bandoned ship.

{
':

Commerce Department Asserts
Sleet Coating on Wing
Caused Tragedy.
WASHINGTON, April 8.-()-
The tricky factor weather has offi-
cial blame for the airplane crash
that killed Coach Knute Rockne
and seven others at Bazaar, Kan.,
March 31.
After saying unofficially that ice
broke the plane propeller, the com-
merce department asserted Tues-
day that a coating of sleet on the
wings of the plane apparently was
responsible for the mishap.
In formal findings, the depart-
ment said its aeronautics inspector
found evidence which indicated
weather was the "primary cause
of the accident."
After the plane pilot received
radio reports from Wichita, Kan.,
that the weather was clear at that
point, the statement said, he prob-
ably attempted to get above the
clouds. ~,~
"In doing so," the findings, "it
is thought that ice collected on the
plane and possibly rendered inoper-
ative certain instruments that func-
tion through the air stream.
"Without these instruments to
assist the pilot, the plane apparent-
ly went into a steep dive. The re-
sults seem to indicate that on com-
ing out of this maneuver, the
change of direction occurred with
such unusual rapidity as to build
up an enormous load on the wings,
which in turn brought about the
wing failure.
The decision was changed, it was
explained, because a missing pro-
pellor had been found. It was
thought at first ice had shattered
the propeller, the subsequent vi-
bration tearing off a wing, but the
missing part was discovered buried
in the ground.
AMRAL BOSCH
CRSLYSHOP d

What's Going on
THEATRES.
Ma estic-"A Connecticut Y ank-
e" with Will Rogm.

Griggs
for

fichigan-"My Past" with Bebe Announcement was made yester-
Stoinean-l. day that Prof. Earl L. Griggs of the
Daniels and Lowis S .English department had been se-
GENERAL. lected as winner of a $300 award
All - Campus Forum - J a m e s offered by the American Council of
Schermerhorn on "The Relation of Learned Societies for his research
the Metropolitan Press to the Uni- into the correspondence of the Eng-
versity;" 4:15 o'clock, room D Alum- lish poet, Samuel Coleridge.
ni Memorial hall.
Play Production--Three one-act INDIANA PREFERS BRUNETTES
plays; 8:30 o'clock, Laboratory the-
atre. UNIVERSITY OF INDIANA -

Awarded Prize
Coleridge Study

Ph ilip, Snowden
master ecor io7nics, socialism and
public affair S.
For more 'than 30 years he has
dragged h 6 injured legs and
cramped bod y to public platforms
and to the i .ouse of commons, hob-
bling along on two rubber-tipped
canes.
Pale, ho.?ow-eyed, sharp-featured
and thin- lipped, only the great
dome of hIs head indicates the brain
power of his ordered mind.
S&ND--GRAVEL
WASHED, SCREENED
\ALL SIZES
CALL
7075, 7112 OR 21014
KILLINS GRAVEL CO.

School of

Italian Officials Move
Bridge in Record Time
LA SPEZIA, Italy, April 8.-(P)--
An unusual engineering feat was
carried out on the railway line,
Parma-Spezia, in removing a rail-
road bridge in eighteen minutes.
The river Taro is crossed by an
iron span weighing 400 tons and
560 feet long, right at the mouth
of the Val Mottola tunnel. The,
bridge was shifted 17 feet to make
space for construction of a new
cement bridge.

Judging from the nominated can-
didates for Junior Prom queen at
the University of Indiana, the In.
,diana Daily Student observes that
the taste of the Indiana men has
changed from blondes to brunettes
' as each candidate is a brunette.
FOR'CKETS & RESERVATIONS SEE
K Uf BLER TRAWEL BUR:AU
ALL IMPORTANT STEAMERS, GRUISES, YOURS.
_AS +iIRANCEAGENCY.

Music

MEN and WOMEN

of "31-

Concerts

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and

ANNOUNCING
of Detroit
Noted American Pianist
Appearing at
Lydia MENDELSSOHN Theatre

CLASS ANNOUNCEMENTS
Whether you desire n beautifully engraved
card or announcement, or printed cards, you
will find us equipped to handle your job I
efficiently. We have a host of samples for
your selection. ,
The Mayer-Schairer Co.
STATIONERS, PRINTERS, BINDERS, OFFICE OUi'FITTERS
122 SOUTH MAIN STREET PHONE 4515

STANLEY FLETCHER, Pianist,
Student's Recital Thursday, April
9, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
THELMA NEWELL, Violinist,
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist, Fac-
ulty concert, Sunday, April 26,
4:15, Mendelssolin Theatre.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Faculty Concert, Wassily Besekir-
sky, Violinist, Hanns Pick, Violon-
cellist, Joseph Brin~cman, Pianist,
Sunday,. May 3, 4:15, Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
RAYMOND MORIN, Pianist,
Student's Recital, Tuesday, May 5,
8:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, James
Hamilton's class will present
scenes from "Aida," Wednesday,
May 6, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, Students
of Nora Crane Hunt, Voicg,
Thursday, May 7, 8:15, School of
Music Auditorium.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist,
in Organ Recital every Wednes-
day, 4:15, Hill Auditorium unless
otherwise announced.

lll

,

Friday Evening
Mail Orders Received Now
Address

April 24

All Seats
$1.00

Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre
Care of "Bishop"
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Box Office
Open
April 20

WE SELL
WE RENT
WE SERVICE
Tel. 2-2812

65adios
615 E. Williams

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PhAtV F nih n g
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NOT A SIDELINE
FILMS left before nine in the
evening are ready the next
afternoon at four.
SPARKLETONE PRINTS are
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HEADQUARTERS for East-
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441 KNEW I had paid that
bill, and here's the proof
-my canceled check."
Mistakes occur in the best
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Hill Auditorium, May 13, 14, 15,
Tickets (6 concerts) $6.00, $7.00,
$8.00.
FIRST CONCERT, Lily Pons, So-
prano; Chicago Symphony Or.
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Wednesday Evening.
SECON D CONCERT, "St. Francis
of Assissi" by Pierne. Hilda Burke,
Soprano;Eleanor Reynolds, Contral-
to; Frederick Jagel, Tenor; Nel-
son Eddy, Baritone; Fred Patton,
Bass; The Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra; The University Choral
Union, Earl V. Moore, Conductor,
Thursday Evening.
THIRD CONCERT, "Old Johnny
Appleseed" by Gaul. Hilda Burke,
Soprano; Eleanor Reynolds, Con-
tralto; Palmer Christian, Organ-
ist, Orchestral accompaniment;
Children's Festival Chorus; Eric
Delamarter and Juva Highee,
Conductors, Friday afternoon.
FOURTH CONCERT, Ignace
Jan Paderewski, Pianist; Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, Frederick
Stock, Conductor, Friday Evening.
FIFTH CONCERT, Ruth Breton,
Violinist; Chicago Symphony Or.

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