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April 05, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STJKDVLAY, A tL 5, ii l

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

. . ...... ...

rr rr w rr

CT HOMPSON,*CERMAK WAGE BATTLE
FOR CHICAGO MAYORALTY CHAIR
F ?n
flF TAX REVENUE~S
Government Believed to Have [
Lost $400,000,000
in New York.f

FIFTY AGENTS IN CITY
Results of Quiz Are Expected
to Influence Present
Administration.
NEW YORK, April 4.-(IP)-The
Federal Government had its firt
contingent of special internal rev-
nue agents at work today on th
theory that it lost millions in in-
come taxes last year from the $200-
000,000 to $400,000,000 racket tr-
bute, which the State Crime Com-
mission estimated is levied annual-
ly in New York City.
More than 50 agents are expected
to be in the city next week to mull
over the material already produced
by the inquiry into magistrates'
courts and to await what illegal
incomes may be uncovered by the
impending legislative investigation
into the city administration. j
Officials Confer.
That the Federal drive to jaill
racketeers and grafters who failed
to pay taxes upon their illegal gains
will cover greater New York was in-
dicated when the Federal district
attorney at Brooklyn came into the
conferences being held by Manhat-
tan government officials to map
plans.
Details of how the Federal Gov-
ernment will interweave its investi-
gation with the inquiries launched
by the governor and legislature
were undisclosed.
The nature of the defense Mayor
James, J. Walker is to make to the
charges filed against him by the
City Affairs Committee was expect-
ed to be revealed today when for-
mer Judge Daniel F. Cohalan
speaks at a luncheon of the League
for Industrial Democracy.
Opponents on Program.
Cohalan is expected to assist Wal-;
kors defense in collaboration with
Samuel Unterniyer. Two of the
Mayor's staunchestropponents were
on the same program. Paul Blan-
chard, executive secretary of the
City Affairs Committee, said he was
prepared to present new data. Nor ;.
man Thomas, Socialist leader, plau-
ned to discuss the city government
under Walker and ' Tammany as
"an organized racket."
The appointment of Robert S.
Johnstone, prominent criminal at-
torney, as a deputy district attor-
ney has given rise to surmises he
was being groomed to'succeed Dict.
Atty. Thomas C. T. Crain, whose
conduct in office is being investi-
gated for the governor by Samuel
Seabury
Senate Council Plan
Proposed by Members
(Continued from Page 1)
blasting the old order but by peace-_
ful penetration of ideas. I am much
interested in the proposed plan of
reorganization of the Senate. It
recognizes that the old Senate is
too large to properly consider edu-
cational matters of general inter-
est, and proposes asua substitute a
federal plan: I would like to see
this scheme given a trial.,,
In the proposal, members of the
present Senate committee on Uni-
versity affairs stated that at the
present time the enrollment of the
Senate proper was 531, with no sti-
pulation as to a quorum necessary
for meeting.
"It is apparent that so large a
body cannot give proper con-
iderations to questions of policy,"
the statement said.

:1r

Associated Presa LPoto.
Mayor William Hale Thompson (right), republican, is waging what
he says is his last fight for re-election to the mayor's job against demo-
crat Anton J. Cermak, who has carried county elections by large major-
ities. The election on April 7 will culminate one of the warmest battles
Chicago has seen.

E[XPERT DISCUSSES
META1LURGY WORK,
Describes Rise of Metallurgical
Science in Address Over
Radio Station.
The applications to which metals
are subjected are unlimited, and
t h e combination of properties
which they must be capable of pos-
sessing in order to best perform
under the various conditions are
nearly as numerous, C. L. Clark,j
research engineer, stated last night
from the broadcasting studio in his
talk on "Metals."
"Metallurgical science has pro-
gressed remarkably during the last
few years and it is now possible to
produce almost any combination of.
properties desired, either through
heat-treatment or by the additicn
of so-called alloying elements to
the base metal, which in the ma-
jority of cases is iron," he said.
He explained that it is largely be-,
cause of these advancements that
the weight per horse-power of the
automobile and airplane has andj
is continuing to decrease.During
the last 10 years alone this decrease
has amounted to 35 per cent.
"It is also because of metallurgi-
cal research that stainless steels
have attained their present state of
importance and perfection," he
said. "Until a few years ago the use
of stainless steel was limited to one
application which was for cutlery.
Now the automobiles in which we
drive, and the large office buildings
in which we work, are ornamented
with stainless steels."
Clark pointed out that metals
have contributed more to the pro-
gress of civilization during the last
few centuries than any other single
factor. Without them, he .said, our
modes and standards of living
would, be much like those of our
primitive ancestor, who lived, in that
era of history known as the stone
age.
FOR CKETS & RESERVA1IO©N SEE
KUE BLER TRAVEL BUREAU
A * **IMPORTANT STEAMERS, CRVIS[S TOURS
601 E. HURON ST. ANN ARB R, MICHI. TEL PHO E 4124t
AE0 4 ER E / UR NC G N Y

Dean Edmonson Will
Speak to Educators
Dean James B. Edmonson, of the
School of Education, will speak on
problems and policies of the North
Central Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools, at a meeting of
the Men's Education club to be held
at 7 o'clock tomorrow night in room
316, at the Union.
Dean Edmonson, former secretary
of this organization, was elected
president at the last meeting.
CRAIG ANNOUNCES
PLANSFOR CAMP
Munising Will Again be Summer
Site for Forestry Study.
Detailed plans for the 1931 sum-
mer forestry camp are being for-
mulated, according to the state-
ment of Prof. Robert Craig, of the
forestry department.
The camp site, as in former years,
will be located near Munising in
the upper peninsula within the
boarders of the newly created na-
tional forest, the Ottowa reserve.
A former lhnber . camp situated
within the area of wild timber
growth will serve as camp head-
quarters as in previous years.

EDMONSON TO TALK
09HNGBROADCAST
Lecture, Lesson, Book Reviews
to be on Weekly Program;
Violinist Will Play.-
Dean James B. Edmonson, of the'
School of education, will discuss
"Present Tendencies in Public Edu-
cation" during the University radio
hour at 5 o'clock this afternoonl
over Station WJR. This is the last
of the - parent-teacher series of
broadcasts. Mrs. J. K. Pettingill,
president of the Michigan Congress
of Parents and Teachers, will give
a concluding talk.
The Michigan University of the
Air program, Monday, will present
Prof. Joseph E. Maddy, of the
School of Music, in the last of a
series of band lessons, who will
conclude by summing up the work
accomplished by means of radio in-
struction. The studio band will
give musical illustrations.
"The Effect of Illuminating Gas
on Plants" is the subject to be dis-
cussed by Prof. Carl D. LaRue, of
the botany department, Tuesday.
RaymondMorin, pianist, will con-
tribute musical interludes.
A forestry talk will be presented
Wednesday afternoon when Prof.
Ernest V. Jotter, of the forestry
school, will take as his topic "How
Rural School Teachers are Teach-
ing Conservation." Sidney Straight,
tenor, accompanied at the piano
by Grace Snyder, will sing a num-
ber of solos.
The fifth of the series of seven
book reviews being given each
Thursday by Prof. Howard Mum-
ford Jones, of the English depart-
ment, will be broadcast Friday. He
'will take as his specific topic for
this program "Literature in the
Machine Age." Romine Hamilton,
violinist, will play several selections.
Broadcasting will be discontinued
during the spring recess. The first
program following the vacation will
be broadcast on Monday, April 20.
Ray K. Immel to Talk
at Alpha Nu Meeting
Prof. Ray K. Immel, head of the
department of speech at the Uni-
versity of Southern California, and
a former member of Alpha Nu, will
address the forensic society at its
meeting next Tuesday night, on the
talking picture industry.
The meeting will be open to the
public, and discussion and questions
will follow the lecture.

Questions designed to cover all savings, room rent, meals, clothes, Old Favorites, New Numbers
possible effects which the current dances, taxis, books, traveling, mov-
business depression may have had ies, organization fees, and liquor. to be on Program.
on student life are included in the A third set of questions deals with
queries which have been presented the possible effects of the depres- Two out-of-town concerts are
at random to 110 women and 270 sion -- if it had cut the student's planned for the Varsity band fol-
men on the campus, by members of income, or forced him to work when lowing spring vacation, Nicholas D.
a class in the sociology of student he had not done so before. Among Falcone, director of the organiza-
life, and also of a class in ele- others, the questions of its effect on
mentary economic statistics. his joining various organizations n, announced yesterday. Shortly
The two classes under the direc- and participating in extra-curricu- after the recess, at a date which
tion of Prof. Robert C. Angell, of lar activities are raised. has not yet been definitely set, the
the sociology department, and Prof. The final part of the question- band will journey to Bay City, while
Morris A. Copeland, of the econom- naire takes up the broader effects on May 4, a concert will be given in
ics department. are also attempting which the depression might have Detroit.
to determine the depression's effect'produced, such as a change in atti- Both concerts are the result of
on students by scrutinizing recent tude towards working students, a numerous requests for the appear-
records of the University, and by more serious view of academic work ance of the band after their con-
interviewing Ann Arbor household- and post graduation plans, change cert two weeks ago. On both the
ers, merchants, restaurant proprie- in grade qf work done, in philoso- programs, virtually the same Aum-
tors, and officials of the Union and phy of life and point of view on bers, with the addition of some of
the League. economic questions. the old favorites will be played.
The first group of questions asked The concert in Detroit is being
seeks in general to determine how HillelWill Hold r sponsored by the Detroit Musical
the depresion has effected the stu- society, and will take place in Or-
dent's ability to secure work. One Formal Dance April 25 chestra hall there as one of the
question asks for the approximate regular concerts on that associa-
proportions of the total semester's Plans for the first annual Spring tion's series.
income for the first semesters of formal dance have been announced
1929-30 and 1930-31 which were by the Hillel foundation. Moore
gained from allowance from home, Goodman and his orchestra will
self supporting work during the play for the dance, to be held April
summer, non-university loans, and 35 in Palmer Field house.s s
ESUDDENPER
~SERVICE t
ilk --HALLER'S
Stwte Street Jewelers

ECONOMICS, SOCIOLOGY CLASSES
SEEK STATISTICS ON DEPRESSION
Students Given Questionnaires University loans and scholarships.
on Effects of Present The second group of questions at-
s C s tempts to compare the utilization of
BusinessCrisis.ri tht i .m

L

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry

High Grade Repair Service

RELIABLE items, moderately priced in the
Semi-Annual Sale.

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Leather Goods
I Pen Knives, Fobs, Cigarette Cases
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Complete Line of Everything Musical
Unexcelled Baldwin Pianos
Victor Micro-Synchronous Radio
Victor and Brunswick, Records
Music Teacher's Supplies
Popular Music
UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Detvoted to Music
601 East Wiliam Phone 7515

i

i

You Can Still Send
Those

..r.

Easter

Flowers

"i

TOOTH BRUSHES
West's 39C
Tooth Brushes............
prophylactic C
Tooth Brushes ............. C
5°C 39C
Z el . . ... .. . . .. . .
39c Brushes 33C
(colored handles)..........
25c and 29c 1 7C
Brushes ..
Soc Tooth Brush Holder C
and Brush..................
LOTIONS
5c Mack's Benzoin 21 C
i.ot ion . . . . . . . . . .
ii.oo Hinus Honey C
Almond7
Soc hinds Honey C
Almond .......
ioc Hinds Honey QC
Aimond8
ioc{C
Jergen's ................... 8
5oC 34C
Frostilla.
Fr stl a ................... C
50C 37C
Parisian Balm ..............
3C
Coubigants ...............89
$i.oo PainsCHand 8{C
Cream ......Q
$ro Pcuns Hand Q1C
Cream....a...............
6oc Pinaud's Hand 49C
Cream...............
35C 2C
Italian Balm ..............
60C 49C
Italian Balm ............
Soc Jergen's 37C
Lotion .. . . . . . . . . . /
SHOMPOOS AND HAIR
TONICS
25c Amami Almond 2 C
Shampoo ........1
15c Amami Henna 2 C
Shampoo ....... I
25c Amami Auburn 2l C
Rinse^ .^". . . L
25c Golden Glint 21C
Shampoo ...
25c Cham Kana 9C
Shampoo ... .
Mulsified Cocoanut Oil Sham-
poo with rubber shampoo 39C
cape . ..................
Palmolive 3
Shampoo .. ..... ..
6oc Packer's Tar or Olive 44 C
Shampoo .
Soc Woodburys2 C
Shampoo
$1.5o Fitch's 94C
Shampoo .........
95c Fitch's 5C
Shampoo ...........
Soc Mack's Hair 3 C
Tonic
6oc '4'7C
Danderine
6oc Wildroot 47C

I.
V

Perhaps you overlooked sending the Easter Greeting
you had in mind for same dear one or friend. In such
case you will find remaining in our greenhouses a
great variety suitable- for your selection.

ATTENDANTS WILL BE AT
TODAY IN OUR STORE ON

YOUR SERVICE
MAIDEN LANE.

Visitors Always Welcome

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