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April 01, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-01

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t

APRIL 1, 1931

THE, Ml HI S

DAILY

FAGE

T.E.M.CHIG A N .A L ..PAGE. ............ .. .....

3
.r.r... r. ' ' t +

. x.

Chi

Omega Wins

First

Place

intramural

In

Swimming

Meet

r"'W-AWN'- W40-,
A-1 P1 uf ism. n PM ow .

RLPHR, XIw0VL1ASDR. B. MEINICKE
\ |TO GIVEADDRESS I1A
A J ,IIOC ID PIgc[Eta Sigma Phi Will Hold Formal
NInitiation Service Thursday. UL IU
Eta Sigma Phi, national classi-Lectures a
cal LatN and Greek honorary so- Mark F
ciety, will hold their formal initia Educ
J tion ceremony at 5:30 o'clock
Individual Score of Thursday in the chapel of the Lectures
Tournament. League building, according to Mary
Tounamnt Hagaman, '3Ed, who is in charge sions mark
of arrangements. After the initia- conference
CUP WILL BE AWARDED tion ceremony is concluded, a for- sociationo
mal banquet will be held at which education
Alpha Phi Sorority Wins Relay Doctor Bruno Meinicke will speak. r
Race; Comes in Third in the programs for the dinner will
be in the form of the old-fashioned Monday a
Diving Event. Roman scroll, carrying out the McCormick
ideas of classical antiquity. Miss yesterday
Chi Omega Sorority, with a score, Hagaman said that she believed Experimen
of 21, won the highest number of that at least 35 people would be Experie
points in the finals of the Intram- present for the initiation ceremony McCormic
ural-swimming meet held last night and the banquet. Monday a
in the Union pool. Alpha Xi Delta change in
won second place, scoring 15 points, The nine new initiates who have
and Alpha Phi came in third with become eligible for the body include yesterday
10 points. Betsy Barbour House and Dorothy Howell, '32, Maurice Green- Dr. Cliff
Martha Cook Dormitory placed star, '32, Anna Sochrens, '31, Jean C o11 e g e,
fourth and fifth respectively with McNaughton, 32, Julia Rogers, '32, "Back Sta
comparatively low scores. MargaretL s k'32,Dorothy formers in
Wells, '32, Frances Walker, '32, and
Jean Berridge, '33, was the mdiv- John Beuret, '31. followed b
idual high point winner of the Lydia Clar
meet, while Jean Botsford, '33, won' sity.
the second highest individual score. NOTICE 2 A round
As a result of the two highest score method of
winners being of the class of '33, There will be an important cation inc
the sophomores won the interclass meeting of the 'Ensian Editorial fication of
meet held in conjunction with the Staff tryouts at 4:00 o'clock to- ,quirement
intramural tournament. day. Lydia Clar
More Than 50 Women Compete. Margaret Morn, sity and N
More than 50 women were enter- the niter
ed in the'five events. Those chosen In the
to compete in the finals were the PAJAMAS OBTAIN FAVOR Steinhaus
ones who had made the best time PAA A BANFV R hiaroi
in the various races held during New York City-Tailored suits Miss Eliza
the five weeks of preliminary meets. and pajama ensembles are newest Iern univer
The events scheduled were, crawl,|features for spring. Short jackets "A Stud
Back stroke, breast stroke, side are to be worn exclusively with the vention o
.roke races and diving. street suit. Pajamas are becoming subject of
The best time made in the crawl more feminine and flowery than weth's lec
stroke of 14.4 seconds was made by ever, as are the afternoon dresses. fromther
Jean Berridge, '33. Jean Botsford, The fashions of the "Gay Nineties Dr. Gertr
'33, took second place and Sarah lakmrecoming into their own once university
King, '34, placed third. In the back more. following.
stroke Jean Berridge again made
the best time, swimming the dis-
tance in 17.3 seconds. Jean Bots- r
ford again gave her a close race, feleiGOWN CRE
fInishing second, and Helen Mason,
'34, camhe in third. i6j-x~ 1 Formals-Str
Florence Eby Wins Breast Stroke. IHm c a
The breast stroke race was won Hemstitchng an
by Florence Eby, '34, in 21.3 sec-
onds. Josephine McCausey, '34, won odise Shoppe Dial 2-1129
second place and Helen Mason, '34,
took third place. Katherine Mc-
Murray, '32, made the best time in
the side stroke event, covering the
distance in 19.5 seconds. Leonore
Caro, '32, came in second, while --C ri lnns ~
Laura Sommers, '33, won third
place.
. In the diving contest Jean Ber-
ridge, '33, piling up 26 points, won
the event. She did a running front,
a back jack knife and a front jack
knife dive. Dorothy Felske, '32,
made 22 points in the contest, exe-
cuting a running front, a one andmE
a half, and a front jack knife dive
Sarah King, '34, was third with 21
points. Her dives were the running i smart
front, and a front and back jack
knife. . The dives were judged on
execution and not on degree of dif-
41uly. 1$ 9N

NELL SPEAKS
IE EDCTORS
and Open Discussions
inal Day of Physical
ation Conference.

Women's Entrance

NEW EXHIBITS OPEA

I .

Into Banking Field IN METROPOL
Due to World War Women Artists Display Works
in Spring Opening at
-- __ N~ Y k~

t
i:
t

and round table discus- a
V
ked the final day of the j e
of the middle west as- c
of Directors of physical c
for women in colleges g
rsities held in Ann Arbor a
id Tuesday. Miss Ethelv
opened the program K
with a lecture on "An t
t in Recreation." Miss
k's talk was scheduled for t
afternoon but due to a r
the p-ogram was given
morning.
'a
ord Brownell of Teacher'sa
Columbia, lectured on r
ge with the 'Star' Per- r
Health" the next hour 1
y a discussion led by Missf
rk of Ohio State univer-
J
table discussion on the
presenting physical edu-
college and on the justi-
the health education re-
was conducted by Miss
rk of Ohio State univer-
Miss Elizabeth Halsey of
sity of Iowa.
afternoon Dr. Arthur
of Y. M. C. A. College,
talked on Physiological)
in Physical Education and
Beth Abbott of Northwest-
rsity led the discussion.
y of the Cause and Pre-
f Athletes Foot was the
Dr. Laurence B. Cheno-
ture. Dr. Chenoweth is
University of Cincinnati.
Nude Moulton of Oberlin
conducted the discussion

Women are gradually coming in-
o their own in the field of bank-
rg, believes Katherine Oglesby, in
he Ladies' Home Journal. The
World war helped to bring this
about, as women stepped into the
vacancies left by men when they
nlisted. There are many handi-
aps, however, to a woman's suc-
eeding in this line of work. Tact;
good humor, good breeding, and
n ability to work harmoniously.
with men, and the ability to take
her job impersonally are charac-
eristics which a woman needs to
e a successful banker.
On the other hand, the oppor-
unities for women in banking are
many. The financial power of the
women in America is rapidly in-
reasing. More and more colleges
are offering night and correspond-
ence courses in economics, mathe-
matics, and statistics. There are
many advantages for women who
know how to sell, for it is easier
or a woman to enter a home than
a man and she will be more at ease.
The investment department also
offers excellent opportunities for
these women.

tew xor .
C. M., '32
Out of the many art exhibits
which opened in New York during
this last week of March there are
two outstanding one-man shows for
women artists, Marie Laurencin and
Dorothy Ochtman. The Durand-
Ruel galleries open with the most
significant show of Marie Lauren-
cin, which is typical of the artist's
work with the usual opaque blues
and thin pinks washed across her
canvasses.
The one exception to Miss Laur-
encin's usual color schemes appears
in the Femme Peintre Espagnole
where the subject's figure is clothed
in a garish red. This diversion from
her style, however, instead of act-
ing as a contradiction to the unity
of Miss Laurencin's individualism
only emphasizes the unerring qual-
ity of mellow charm which is hers.
It brings home even more realisti-
cally the artist's power as a master
of vague beauty as opposed to many
of the others of the modern school
who startle canvasses into a naked
beauty.

N THIS MONTH
TAN ART GALLERIES
in the Grand Central galleries and
exhibits flower still-lifes. Miss Ocht-
man, to all appearances, has sub-
merged herself in the study of ar-
chaeology and ancient arts to such
an extent that she has lost a con-
sciousness of her own individuality.I
This is most plainly shown in the
choice of subject matter which she
usually makes, i. e., most of her'
still-life arrangements include some
skillfully patterned production of
the artisan's skill, such as a vase.
If Miss Ochtman could put more
faith into her own creations, her
work would undoubtedly be of con-
siderable value, for her under-
standing of color and compositional
arrangement is exceptional. As it
is, her work smacks of the academ-
ic. In her anxiety to reproduce her
subject in a realistic fashion andl
in her efforts to recreate the slen-
der curves of her subjects without
any loss of their original beauty,
the artist completely overlooks her
own interpretation, a quality which
is exceptional in the modern schools
of art.
CORNELL UNIVERSITY-A def-
inite and permanent cure of mor-
phinism has been discovered here

POOR SCHOLARSHIP
CONF[EENCE HELD,
Miss Perry and Miss Stevenson
Interview Students on
Low Grades.
Conferences are now being held
with women who had scholastic
difficulties last semester. Two mem-
bers of the Dean of Women's staif
are conducting these interviews:
Miss Jeanette Perry is in charge
of sophomores, juniors, and seniors;
Miss Ellen Stevenson is interview-
ing freshmen. All who received
grades unsatisfactory enough to
place them on warning or on pro-
bation are requested to come to the
Dean of Women's office.
Miss Stevenson is giving not only
sophomores and upperclassmen, but
all freshmen women who wish 'to
have a check on their work, slips
to take to their various instructors.
Many of the residents of the sor-
orities, dormitories, and league
houses have availed themselves of
this service in order that they may
learn their standing in their re-
spective courses.

Dorothy Ochtw an holds a show by Prof. W. D. Bancroft, it is said.

-- -----

1i

! i

1 I

mom

3 - -
---- ___ ---- -____ .__ _ -I
_ _ II

I

--ec-- ve cours

_ 1
U JIEIUIlUI~5~U

Te Easter Fashjon Parade

fit

egins t Jacobson's,
Fashions for Easter dash colorfully on to their rendez-
vous with Chic, and chic achieves a new distinction in
the rodes on display at Jacobson's Shop of Personal
Service..1

i

ATIONS

eet Wear
id Alterations
620 East

Liberty

You'll give a hand to the
swank gloves that are dis-
porting themselves h e r e .
F o u r to sixteen - button
lengths,, and they're as
necessary a part of your
costume as your hose.

9I

:) e

* .
- -

ter Day

And here you'll find a note-
worthy collection of hand-
bags, in a wide range of un-
usual and interesting
models. Tuck one of these
under your arm when you
join the fashion parade on
Easter.

w Pair

Drear, dull days are ahead
if you consider hosiery. For
never has a brighter spot on
the fashion horizon been

I !!!t I

Relay Race Held.
At the close of the four swin,-
xning events a relay race was held,
each house entering its four fast-
est swimmers. Alpha Phi won the
relay.
The points for the various events
were awarded on the following sys-
tem: first place in a race, 4 points,
second, 3 points, third, 2 points and
fourth 1 point. In the relay race
the winner received 8 points, sec-
Ond place 6, third, 4 and fourth 2.
House to Receive Cup.
The house winning the intramur-
al swimming meet will receive a cup
from the Women's Athletic Associa-
tion.
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-
A plan for a university "At Home"
week, culminating with all tradi-
tional spring activities, has been
adopted and will go into effect next
year.

to$8
Blondes
. . . Sea Sands
. . . Reptiles
. . Pastel Kids
.,.Blacks
. Suva Cloths
. d Beauvais
and others

ODESV J4'Y - y' ' Y''

I1

Mt? IC drill.

Yet they're

..
s
\
\
, ,
' .

I

C

Coats feature scarf necklines, revers, low-hung
flares, unusual cuff treatments. Skipper blue,
navy blue, blatk and white, are among the favored
colors, though gray is important, as are beige and
green. Both tailored and fur trimmed models are
included in our collection.
Suits emphasize their right to individuality, showing jackets
as abbreviated as a bolero and as long as a three-quarter coat
-and all lengths in between. Wool crepes new jersey weaves
tweeds . . . they're all here for your selection.

DMIrvels of k2itting perfec.
uon, beautifully clear, with
their picot tops and smart
hc S
Lingerie shows that it is mind-
ful of the frocks to be worn
over it. The new flare lines
are to be found in our collec-
tion. Choose in pastel shades
or white . . . tailored or lace
trimmed.

Jaoso'

To be really swanky, lace mitts
should be worn with your twi-
light dresses. They come in
the newer spring shades of
black, white, eggshell, green
and blue.

;

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in III !

SENIOR.

WO E,.wN

ov

1931

YOUR CLASS DUES ARE NOW PAYABLE IN CONNECTION WITH THE PURCHASE OF
THE "MICHIGAN ALUMNUS." ONLY TWO MORE DAYS REMAIN FOR YOU TO DO
THIS, SO TAKE THE OPPORTUNITY AND DO IT IMMEDIATELY.

real --- - - ------ - ---- -- --- -- -- - - - r®IN,%

I

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