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March 27, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-27

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27, 1931

'HE MICHIGAN

DAILY

27, 1931 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.S7.446-3,Z
OEM VA

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WOM'ENTO ENOLL
FOR OUTDOOR GYM
SPORT ACTIVIITIE
Will Take Place Next Thursday
and Friday During Regular
Gymnasium Classes.
GOLF, TENNIS POPULAR
Everyone Who Is Interested
May Enter Any Section j
Desired.
Registration for gymnasium clas-
ses will take place Thursday and
Friday of next week and not to-
morrow as previously announced.
Students will register during their
regular gymnasium period and at-
tendance at classes those two days
is compulsory.
May Elect Any Sport.
Students will be allowed to elect
any sport in which they are inter-
ested and anyone wishing to enter
a class who is not taking required
physical education is welcome.
Registration for those who wish to
enter the class merely to learn the
sport and not for credit will take
place every day next week in the
office of Barbour gymnasium.
Those interested in learning any
sports are asked to sign their name,
the sport they wish, and the con-
venient hour on election blanks in
the, office. Electives will be givenI
the preference in the choice of
classes and the hours over late re-
quired registration.
Department Makes Survey.
The Physical education depart-
ment conducted a survey to deter-'
mine what sports were the most
popular among college women and
are offering those activities which
received the majority of votes as
required work for credit. Golf and
tennis proved to be the most popu-
lar and classes have been arranged
that will prove convenient to all
students.
Classes in horseback riding are
open to second semester sopho-
mores for credit. However, all other
students are welcome to enter the
classes who wish to learn to ride.
Passion Week Features
Cantata Sunday Night
On- Sunday night, the cantata,
"The Seven Last Words of Christ,"
by Theodore DuBois, will be given
at the Church of Christ, Hill and
Tappan. This musical work is the
last words on the cross and is be-I
ing given at the beginning of Pas-
sion Week.
Those taking important parts in
the performance a r e Burnette
Bradley, '32, Louise Jacobus, '3Ed,,
Marion Holmes, Hope Baner Eddy,
Jane MacNamee, Jean Cowin, Le-
land Randall, Ralph Owen, Nelson
Eddy,dRalph Banta, and William
Eldred.
Hope Bauer Eddy is directing the
cantata and Leah Margaret Bich-
tenwalter will be the organist.

Freshmen Pageant.
to Have No Poster
Contest This Year
"There will be no poster contest
in this year's advertising campaign
for the Freshmen Pageant," said
Pauline Brooks, '34, chairman of
the poster committee. "We are
going to depend on the cooperation
and interest of the Freshmen
women, and hope to get just as
many good posters as in previous
years."
Miss Brooks continued, "Former-
ly, it was the custom to conduct a
contest and use the best poster as
the program cover. However, the
publicity committee has decided
that, because the best poster does
not always make the best cover,
the poster committee will design
the cover for the program this
year."
SOCIETY ATTENDS
FORMALMUSICAL
Mrs. Peterson Entertains Sigma
Alpha Iota Members.
Sigma Alpha Iota members and
pledges were guests of Mrs. Peter-
son on Tuesday night at a formal
musical. The program was furnish-
ed by two-ncwly initiated members
and one pledge of the chapter.
Ihe program included: Brahms:
Wie Melodien; Cesti: Intoma all
'idol; Folk Song: Summer is y'
Comm' in; by Mirnavieve Voegts,
'31SM.
Handel: O Mio Con; Scarlotti:
O Cessati di Peagaomi; Respighi:
Nebbie; by Gwendolyn Zoller.
Beethoven: Sonata Op. 2, No. 2;
DeBussy: La Fille Aux Chevaux
duBin; by Jane Neracher, '34.
Mendelssohn: On Wings of Music;
Chadwick: D'a n z a; Schumann:
Thoughts have Wings; by Thelma
Peck, '32.
Mrs. Litchfield, a guest of Mrs.
Peterson from Philadelphia, played
several piano numbers after the
program.

THE TA SIGMA PHIi
INITIATES__TWELVE
Journalism Sorority Completes
Plans for Awarding Cup
to Sophomore.
Theta Sigma Phi, national hon-
orary and professional fraternityl
for women in journalism, initiated
twelve new members Tuesday night,
March 24. in the League building.
The initiates were Frances Buten,
'31, Ruth Anderson, '31, Helen Mus-
selwhite, '32, Edith Ellen Houghey,
'31, Roberta Minter, '32, Katherine
Brook, '31, Helen Carrm, '31, Mary
McCall, '32, Sally Wilbur, '32, Doro-
thy Meade, '30Ed., Mary Dunnigan,
Grad., and Cile Miller, '32.
These women were elected to
Theta Sigma Phi in recognition of
their excellence in journalistic work,
both on campus publications and
in the department of journalism.
The organization also announces.
that Mrs. John D. Brumm, Mrs.
Donal H. Haines, and Mrs. Wesley
H. Maurer have become patrones-
sets.
Plans are being completed by the
group for the awarding of a silver
loving cup to the sophomore woman
who has done the best work on a
campus publication during the cur-
rent year. The women's editors of
the various publications will consult
with the committee of judges in
their selection of the cup winner,
and the decision will be announced
during the first week in May.
In selecting the sophomore who,
has shown the most proficiency in
her work during the year, the
judges will consider general jour-
nalistic ability, consistency in do-
ing good work, and loyalty to the
publication of which she is a staff
member. Since membership in The-
ta Sigma Phi is limited to women
of junior and senior standing, no
member of the organization will be
eligible for the award.

SPEEDBLL OPENSL
A9S SPRING SPORT~
Practices to be Held on Tuesday
and Thursday Afternoons
After Vacations.
Posters will be placed in the Wo-
men's Athletic building this week
for women interested in signing up
for speedball, according to an an-
nouncement by Jean Bently, '33,
manager of speedball on the Wo-
men's Athletic Association board.
Practices will begin the first week
after spring vacation, and will be
held at 4 o'clock on Tuesday and
Thursday afternoons. The present
schedule allows three weeks for
practices and three weeks for games
before June 1.
Speedball will replace baseball
as the major interclass sport this
year, although intramural baseball
will be played as usual. Each class
will have as many teams as the
number interested in playing al-I
lows. Class managers, who are to
be appointed later, will have charge
of organizing the teams.
Speedball is a new sport on this
campus, being inaugurated. last
year, and the teams will be largely'
made up of new material.
W. A. A. points will be awarded to
team members on the basis of 100
points for a place on a first team,
and 50 points for playing on a sec-
ond team. If third or fourth teams
are organized, points will be award-
ed on a similar basis.
Y. W. C. A. PLANS CLASSES
New swimming classes will be
formed by the Y. W. C. A. on March
31, and will continue for a term of
three months. The classes will use
the Union pool. An auction bridge
class also will be started immedi-
ately after Easter if enough stu-
dents express a desire for one.
These classes are both open to
University students.

IRVING K. POND FINDS FEW WOMEN
ENTER ARCHITECTURAL PROFESSION
Turn to More Conventional serted Mr. Pond. "There are not,
Fields In stead. as yet, many women in the field
of architecture. They turn too of-
By E. G. F ., 3 ten to the conventional thing. In
Famous professional men are of- order to be a real architect one
ten times disappointing in a first
impression but it wasn't so with must be able to pick up a stone
Irving K. Pond, prominent Chicago and place it; one must compre-
architect who designed and built hend it and feel it. Women have
both the Michigan Union and the not as yet felt the great play of 1
League building. forces through them."
And the same may be said for Fields Open to All.
the wives of professional men. Mr. "T eis afeldtoreryn
and Mrs. Pond well fitted into the "There is a field for everyone
atmosphere of the room which they who can't keep out of it, and no
occupied in the Michigan Union. field for anyone who thinks he be-
He is tall, and distinguished, has longs somewhere else," stated Mr.
snow white hair, and a sense of Pond. "And this applies to women."
humor. She is small has snow "This business of being attrac-
white hair, and a charming smile. tive is a 'problem," asserted the ar-
chitect. "If women are attractive,
Room Has Antiques. they distract the men's attention,
Their room is quite unusual. It is and if they aren't, why it isn't so
furnished with all antique pieces good either. Another thing is that
from the old Pond home. This is it isn't as easy to discharge a wo-
always their room when they come man as a man."
to Ann Arbor but permission has
been granted to the Michigan Un- UNIVERSITY OF C H I C AGO-
ion to rent it. Due to several recent holdups on
Mr. Pond graduated from the Dt
school of engineering in '79, and the campus, the superintendent of
is one of the first of the twelve buildings and grounds here has an-
thousand life members of the Mich- nounced a plan whereby the stu-
igan Union. He is now giving a dent body may cooperate more ef-
series of lectures in the school of fectively with the campus guards.
architecture. Any number of men may now be
Women Are Not Ventures9me. sent to any spot on the campus
"Women are not half as venture- within 10 minutes time by calling
some when it comes to architecture the chief of police through the
as when it comes to clothes?" as- buildings and grounds office.
PRE-EASTE -'R
SELLINGR Spring F rocks

Frocks

(others $19.75 to $25.00)
with Long and Short
Some with Jackets

1.

- I

Spectator Sports
There are WALK-OVER shoes for active
participation in sports and shoes for the
spectator who enjoys the game from the
sidelines. This Pavola Buckle Strap falls
in the latter classification. It is perforated
for coolness and comfort, not only a high
style feature, but a healthful one as well.
It allows the feet to breathe. The delight-
ful combination is Sea Sand Calf with
Spanish Brown Calf trim.
$10*00

PAVALO.BUCKLE STRAP

This fine assortment includes silk suits, knit suits, one
and 2-piece jersey dresses, wool crepes, print chiffons, plain
and figured crepes.
Colors are of generous variety:
Skipper Blue, Chucker Green
Rose Beige, Patou Red
Cocoa Brown, Tans
Navy and Black
You will want a new hat to complete your outfit.

11

Sea Sand Calf with Spanish Brown
ligdE N'S ,WALK-OVER SHOP
115 S.MAN ST. ANN ARBOR

i

frankly-

_ .

.1.

-we have never before been able to secure, at
reasonable prices, such lovely
lounging pajamas
-these are of all sizes, with or without coats, all silk, plain,
and figured.
T$5.95-$14.7
The Helen Shoppe
Michigan Theatre Building

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HEADLINE
FASHIONS

What Is The Dirference In
Silk Stocking Prices -
Last Year And
This?
Beautiful Silk Stockings
Stockings Are
BETTER
In Every Way Than Last Year

Y Ready for
0Y
WATER SNAKE
With the most gorgeous array of new
A parade of Easters Newest
ns. Footwear Styles! For theV
women who appreciate style
....and knows value, will find U
it highly profitable in making
her footwear selections here.
_____ ____ ____70 STYLES iiI
NEWE T CREATIONS
~-SEA-SAND KIDS
-BLONDE KIDS
0-;REPTILES
LPASTEL KIDS
S-BLACKS I
AND OTHERS

D

S H E universal que st
among fashion leaders
for "something different"
in coats has found a charm-
ing solution in our newest
scarf collar coats which in-
troduce novel and flattering
fur treatments. It is ex-
pected that they will find an
ardent welcome in the finest
circles.

LAST YEAR
Style 531 made as it is
made today would
have sold for
$1.95
Style 591 made as it is
made today would
have sold last year for

THIS YEAR
STYLE 531 IS
$.50
STYLE 591 IS
TODAY
:.95

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