100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 26, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY- MARCH 26, 1931

TH-IC I A-D IYTHRDY AC 2

v} ivvi

Ntators

to

Leave for

ational Tank Meet

Today

r

TEN HSITI M i
TO MAKEJOURNEYi
Michigan Team Threatens First
Place in Three Events;
Bank on Schmieler.
Ten men will leave Ann Arbor
this afternoon bound for the eighth
annual National Collegiate swim-
ming championship meet at Chi-)

LOSS OF GEORGE PIPGRAS CAUSES
MUCH WORRY TO BOSS M'CARTHY
Manager Joe McCarthy of the
New York Yankees assumed a real:
burden when he agreed to replace
Bob Shawkey as pilot of theI
Gotham clan in the race for theI
1931 American League pennant.
Not only is he face to face with
the task of bringing the Yanks
back to their former position in:
the league by winning the pennanty
in his first year, but he also is
confronted with the task of re-
building the pitching staff that
crumbled so badly last season.
McCarthy could only bank upon
one or two hurlers to do regular .
duty as it should be done, with his
main hopes being centered on
George Pipgras, ace of the Yankee
mound corps in 1930. And then.
just before the start of the train
ing season, Pipgras suffered an
acute attack of appendicitis and
was taken to a hospital to be oper- :
ated upon.
May Mean Pennant. :::::

Coach Kipke Will Conduct First
Outdoor Drill of Season
on Ferry Field.
Spaing football training will be-
gin in earnest on Monday. Mole-
skins will be handed .u to the
men Friday and Satuc iy, andl
should the weather be favorable, a
few hopefuls will probably get out!
on South Ferry field those days

LENFESTY RECOGNIZED AS STAR
IN WINDY CITY GOLFING CIRCLES

(Editors note: This is the fourth
of a series of articles dealing with
members of the Varsity golf team.)
Jack Lenfesty, who gained con-
siderable fame for himself digging
divots on the Varsity golf team last
spring, has long been recognized as
a conspicuous contender for golf-
ing honors in the Chicago district.
Although Jack hasn't managed to
break into the "big money' class
in the larger tournaments, he has
on several occasions fought his way
into the semi-finals, and bids fair

eliminated in the semi-finals of the
Chicago City tournament, 2-1, and
in the qu4rter-finals of the West-
ern Junior, 3-2.
Loses at Indianwood.
Several invitational tournaments
in the Chicago district fell before
his masterful stroke last year, but
he ran into his old jinx again and
lost out in the later rounds of the
bigger meets. In the Western Open
at Indianwood his 54 hole total of
232 eliminated him by one stroke

FISHER PINS* HOPES
ON THHREEBATTERS
Hudson, Tompkins, Eastman
Favored to Carry Brunt
of Varsity Attack.
All the members of the baseball
squad being accounted for with the
appearance of Daniels last week,
Coach Ray Fisher is continuing
with strenuous daily practice ses-
sions in the field house. Batting
practice is still being stressed by

cago, where Coach Matt Mann will
attempt to guide them on their
way to a national title to add to
their already brilliant record of a
Big Ten championship.
Michigan's big threats will be in
the breaststroke, the medley relay,
and the 400-yard relay. If the
Maize and Blue representatives can
take first places in these events
they will just about cinch the title,
for a second or third place here
and there in the 50-yard sprints,
the 440, the 220, anct the free style
are almost certainties with the
aggregation of star natators that
Coach Mann is taking to the
Windy City.
Schmieler Favored.
Johnny Schmieler, holder of the
worldrecord in the 200-yard breast
stroke, is a favorite to take that
event, for his mark of 2:31.4 has
not been approached. Ted Moles,
Princeton star and former holder
of the collegiate mark of 2:34, has
not been entered, thus eliminating
one of the outstanding competitors
for the title. Illness has kept Moles
from entering. Schmieler's opposi-
tion will come from aspirants as
new as himself in Harms of Ford-
ham, West of Princeton, Evans of
Iowa, and Kruger of Minnesota.
The middle, west is also favored
to cop the backstroke for Lowell
Marsh, Minnesota ace, who holds
the Big Ten record at 1:43, holds
the top position with the an-
nouncement that George Kojac of
Rutgers has not been entered in
the event. Kojac has been swim-
ming the 100 and the 220 in the
past few meets this season. Two
other Eastern men who will make
a bid for this title are Ed Scherer
and Bob Long, both of Princeton.
Fancy diving competition seems,
to be a place where Michigan will
not shine, for four of the winners
of the event last year are again
entered. These include Lobdell of
Iowa, winner of the Big Ten title,
Mickey Riley of Southern Califor-
nia, holder of the A. A. U. diving
crown, Jack Fisher of Springfield,
and Walter Grandy of Penn. Walter
Nappa of Minnesota who took a
sixth place last year is also enter-1
ed again.{
Free Style Strong.
Michigan's quartet of free styleI
natators, Ladd, Klintworth, Marcus,
and Fenske will provide plenty of
opposition for the other entries in
the 100, 50 and 220-yard free style
sprints, but none of them are good
for a first place in these events.
Smith is also favored to place high'
in the 100-yard event, for he copped
a fourth in' the meet last year.f
Other sprint stars who will be comL
peting include Kojac, who is the
favorite in both the 100 and the
220, and Wilson of Northwestern.
Schmieler looks good for a second
place 'in the 220.
Kennedy will be Coach Mann's
best bet in the 440, but will find
some tough opposition in AustinI
Clapp, Stanford middle distaneb
star, and Buster Crabbe of South-
ern California. Crabbe is the A. A.
U. 440 crawl champion. The Michi-
gan entry looks good for a second
place in this event.
Cincinnati Reds Seek.
to Buy Cardinal Star
TAMPA, Fla., Mar. 25.-()-Re-
ports that the Cincinnati Reds had
offered $40,000 for Chick Hafey,
holdout outfielder of the St. Louis
Cardinals, were discounted here to-
day. In the absence of Sidney Weil,
president, the report could not be
confirmed, but Manager Howley
said he doubted that Weil would
pay that much,
TYPEWRITING & i%

i ! rand
MIMEOGRAPHING
A speciality for tweinty
years.,
Prompt service . . . Experienced oper-
ators . . . Moderate rates.
0. D. MORRILL

That one break may cost the
New York club the pennant. Pip-
gras will be lost to the team for
several weeks, even though he is
recovering rapidly from the -opera-
tion. But even when he does get
back he will take some time to get
into his best physical condition, so
that it will likely be mid-season
before the Yankee ace can operate
with his full effectiveness.
Meanwhile McCarthy will be
forced to rely on Charlie Ruffing as
his first string hurler, with several
other holdovers from last year, all
of them mediocre pitchers, to assist
the former Red Sox star. Of all the
BRmUINS GI,N LEAD
Come From Behind to Nose Out
Champs; Meet in Second
Contest Tonight.
NEW YORK, Mar. 25.-(IP)-To
the bruising Boston Bruins and the
speedy New York Rangers go the
honors of the first night in the
playoffs among National Hockey
League clubs for the Stanley Cup,
emblem of the world's professional
hockey championship.
The Toronto Maple Leafs and
Chicago Blackhawks, the third pair
of teams to see action in hockey's
"World Series" Tuesday night, fail-
ed to reach a decision, winding up
their 60 minutes of play in a 2-2
tie.
Boston was late in showing its
power but came through in the
third period to overtake the world's
champion Montreal Canadiens and
won, 5 to 4, after nearly 20 minutes
of overtime play in the first of a
five game series between the teams
that topped the two divisions.
The Rangers routed the Montreal
Maroons, their rivals in the two-
game third place series, 5 to 1. This
series, like that between the sec-
ond place Toronto and Chicago
teams, is decided on the basis of
total goals scored in two games.
The first place teams play again in
Boston tonight before moving to
Montreal to complete their series.

George ipgras
men on the Yankee pitching staff,
it was a break of the toughest kind
that will keep the team's star out
of the game for such a long period.
Defeated Pirates.
Pipgras has been one of the stars
of the league for a period covering
approximately five years. The tall
right hander got his first chance
to start many games for the Yanks
in the year that the Gotham club
met the Pittsburgh Pirates in the
World Series and walked off with
four straight games. Pipgras pitch-
ed the second game of that series,
and as at the time he was just a
raw rookie, he brought considerable
attention on himself as a result of
the case with which he tamed the
Pirates.
With Herb Pennock growing older
every year and losing his effective-
ness slowly, the 'Yankee pilots,
Huggins and Shawkey, have come
more and more to depend on Pip-
gras to carry them through the sea-
son. ,
TRYOUTS REPORT
Oosterbaan Starts Batterymen
to Work in Field House.
About 12 or 15 freshmen have be-
gun practice as pitchers and catch-
ers on the freshman baseball squad,
Coach Oosterbaan said yesterday.
Workouts have been held daily
since Monday. So far the men have
engaged only in limbering-up ex-
ercises to get their arms in shape,
so no estimate of available talent
can be made this early.
The fielders and the remainder
of the squad will not be assembled
for practice before Spring vacation.
They will be asked to report im-
mediately after returning to school.
Additional freshmen interested in
trying out as battery men may re-
port any afternoon at 3 o'clock at
Yost Field house,
TRENTON-Mickey Walker, mid-
dleweight champion, may have
" acted to quickly for his own good!
when he married Clara Helherm
Monday night. He has since learned
that his divorce from his first wife
is not absolute yet.

Cj-p -"pWo.h to be up among the leaders before
Coach Kipke expects to have IImn oesmeshv asd
about 70 candidates, nearly halfi many more summers have passed.
3f whom are freshmen, respond to eseason of 1929 was really the
Lhe call for spring practice. Plans beginning of his career as a top-
gall for work on funda.ientals all notch contender and he managed
xt week and duing the first two shake off his semi-finalist com
clays of he succeeingtweek, i plex long enough to carry off the
days of the succeeding week. In championship cup in the Mid-west
order that there will be no inter- Amateur. This same year he was
ference with mid-semester exami-
nations the squad will be dismissed
for the last three days.
Freshmen Work Out.
After the spring vacation, the
squad will come out for three and'
possibly four weeks, depending up-
on the amount of drill which theI
weather conditions will permit. The
Michigan mentor has promised that Gains Lead in Race for Honors
every man who reports for the
spring training period will be pro- in International League
vided with plenty of work. The by 2 to 1 Victory.'
freshmen have already gone through
a prelifminary drill indoors. CLEVELAND, 0., Mar. 25.-(1P)-"
To Split Squad. I The Cleveland Indians were in the
Following the spring recess, the lead today for the Hockey chain-
group will be divided into four pionship of the International Lea-
squads of approximately e q u a 1 gue, by virtue of their 2 to 1 victory
strength for scrimmages. The pro- Tuesday night over the Pittsburghj
gram calls for scrimmage sessions sextet.
twice each week. This arrangement After a scoreless first period,
will throw every man into actual Pittsburgh took the lead with a
competition six or eight times dur- shot by Leo Reise. It was 13 min-
ing the entire period. This program utes later before the Indians tied
will give the young Wolverine the score. Cliff McBride sifted
mentor not only information on through the Pittsburgh defense,
the yearlings who will be eligible fired the puck toward Abbie Cox,
for Conference competition next who let it lay long enough for Capt.
fail, but will also provide him with Alec Gray of the Indians to bat
a means of getting a better line it home.
o7° the men who were in moleskins A close-up shot by Doug Young
last season. in the final period, after a wild
Regular games in the stadium scrimmage in front of Pittsburgh's
will play a definite part in deter- net gave the Indians the deciding
mining the invitation list which score.
will be sent out late in the sum- Cleveland will play its second
mer, prior to the start of the foot- game of the playoffs with the
ball season. Windsor Bulldogs at the Windsor
Arena tonight. The Bulldogs, who
Another sport that has started finished second to Buffalo in the
already but will get into a fuller season's play were to have met the
stride ere long is golf. The links I Bisons in Buffalo Tuesday night,
of the country will be tortured a- but a new ice plant is being in-
gain before many weeks with the stalled in the Buffalo rink and the
relentless attempts of dubs. game was postponed.
~ ~ -

for further consideration and he Coach Fisher with the view of
was obliged to witness the finish building up as strong an offense as
from the gallery. In the semi-finals possible.
of the Chicago District tournament This offensive will be built around
he again ran into a tartar and was Hudson and Tompkins, probably
deprived of the opportunity of the two heaviest hitters on the
fighting for the title in the finals. team, with much also expected from
His 72 hole total of 310 was good Eastman, a member of the team
enough to gain him a tie for fourth two years ago and a capable in-
position with Lyons of Illinois in fielder as well as a dependable out-
the Western Conference meet. A fielder.
bad third round of 82 cost him an Weather permitting, Coach Fish-
excellent chance for top honors. er hopes to get his squad outdoors
Holds One Record. the latter part of this week so that
Although on several occasions he will be able to get a line on a
Jack has established course rec- possible infield combination. Var-
ords at different places around the ious combinations will be used in an
countryside, his chief difficulty has effort to allow every man a chance
been that he didn't set them low to show just what he is capable of
enough and the only one which he doing. The work will be facilitated
now holds is on the second nine by the inauguration of practice
at Barton Hills, which he toured games as soon as the squad gets
in 32. outdoors.
Jack has been working out when- Besides the necessity of rebuild-
ever the weather has permitted and ing the infield, problems are pre-
reports that he is in fine condition senting themselves in the pitching
for the coming campaign. and catching departments as well.
° -- Though the pitching department,
Faccording to Coach Fisher, causes
FOOTBALL NOTICE him as much concern as in the past
All football candidates report few years, still he has high hopes
for uniforms at the Field House of building an average pitching
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday staff out of those men at his dis-
afternoons. Practice willbe held posal. Several of the pitchers have
both Friday and Saturday if been improving daily under his
weather permits. tutelage and by the time outdoor
Harry Kipke, Coach. workouts begin should be in good
shape.

- .

Good

c1amothes

Help You to
Get

A Style

0Pt i

Good

Job~gs

You're sure to find exactly what you.
Want in our great
Easter w g
Society Jirn Clos
F IRST of all we want to tell you that Society
Brand prices are lower-the values surpris-
ingly bigger and better than even the record-
breaking values of last year. There's an unusually
large variety of amazingly luxurious fabrics to select
from - in the wonderfully attractive Neptune
Shades. In Society Brand's very latest and
smartest new spring styles and other makes. Sizes
for men of all ages and proportions.

..\4chga a
The Suit. A two-button coat sligthly fitted is
most popular this season, tailored of fine tweeds
and worsteds, in shades of gray, green, tan and
light gray.
Tailored and designed to the strict specifications
of Mr. Del Prete.
The price $35.00. Two trouser.
Tailor made at $25.00-$29.50.

The men who are getting hired or
promoted these days are the ones who
make a good appearance-
Looking well is a big factor in do-
ing well
And it costs very little to, look well
-$28.50 for a Hart Schaffner & Marx

II

III

suit with one pair of

trousers-$35.00

The Topcoat.

The belted back stands fore-

most, tailored in tweeds and llamas, in shades of
grays and tans.
The price $25.00-$29.50.
The Hat, The snap brims featured in scores
of new pastel shades, with a narrow silk binding
or a plain edge.
The price $5.00.
Ties and Shirts in hli ar m o n i z in g spring
spring shades.
See these feature items while our
stock is comnlete.

for the 2-trouser suit.
-they ft your figure
they fit your purse
they fit your style ideas

they fit your job

III

Suits

314 South State St.

Phone 6615

I

$25 to $50

Topcoats are presented in both
raglan shoulder and set in sleeves
styles from
$25 to $30

2 trouser

SEN AVANT
A
^r
Ai

. .
'f:.

A
ever forward
T
Ai

Topcoats

f

II

I

E1

.r...-- z

11

III

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan