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March 25, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-25

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25,, 1931

THE, TCHIGAN

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25,, 1931 THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

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Jean

Botsford Selected

as

Chairman

for

MRGARE1\T OBRIEN
NAMED ASS ISTANTI
AT CLASS MEEI

ELECTED HEAD OF
1932 JUNIOR PLAY

Barbara Braun Named Business
Manager; Katherine Barnard
Heads Properties.
EMILY BATES GIVES TALK

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Catherine Heeson Is in Charge
of Arrangements for
Programs.
Jean Botsford was elected general
chairman of the 1932 Junior Girls'
Play at a meeting of the Sopho-
more women yesterday afternoon
in the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre.
Margaret O'Brien was named as-
sistant chairman, Barbara Braun
w a s chosen business manager,
Katherine Barnard will have chargeP
of properties, and Catherine Heesone
will head the program committee.C
These women will form the cen-
tral committee for next year's playt
and will appoint all other commit-7
tee heads later this spring and in
the fall. Work on the general de-
tails of the production will get un-
der way soon as possible.
Council in Charge.
The elections were conducted un-
der the auspices of the Judiciary
council, and Ruth Van Tuyl, '31,
presided as chairman of that body.
Nominations in addition to those
submitted by the league board rep-c
resentatives were made from thef
floor.
Emily Bates, '32, general chair-r
man of "Came the Dawn! ," thisc
year's Junior Girls' Play, spoke to
the sophomore women on the main
problems of the production, andI
outlined the duties of the five3
chairmen. She told of the respon-1
sibilities involved, and named out-i
standing qualifications which wouldI
be, necessary for each office.
TALK ON PARENTC
EDUCATION GIVEN
Mss Rasey Broadcasts Underi
Auspices of University. E
Describing the work being donet
in classes for Parental Education
in Detroit, Miss Marie Rasey of the1
Parental Advisory department of1
the Detroit Public Schools gave a
radio talk recently over stationi
WJR. This address was the twenty-t
second in a series of speeches ont
Parental Education, which is being1
sponsored by the Extension Division
of the University and the Michigan
Congress of Parents and Teachers.
According to Miss Rasey, eigh-
teen discussion groups have been!
organized in Detroit. She said that
the groups range in size from nine
to eighty-five members with. a
leader in charge of each one. Miss
Rasey explained that the method of
discussion was one of answering
specific questions brought up by the
parents pointing out at the same
time the general fundamental prin-
ciples involved.
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-
Student opinion opposes the pre-
sent state attempt at legislation
against s m o k i n g in university
buildings, according to a leading
editorial in the Daily Nebraskan,
which says in part: "Students on
the campus today are calling the
senators every sort of name, be-
cause of the time they have wasted
on a bill so inconsequential as the
anti-smoking measure."
Yo win get more out
of your Un versihy cae
reer if you ar, able to
thme ad thee" Yu
notes will be much full-
er if you take them in
shorthand. hundreds of
Michigan students have

learned typewriting and
shorthand at Hiamilton
Business College. Many
have used it to earn
money or, the side or
during 'vacation. You
will also find it very
valuable in your career
after graduation.
Typewriting
Shorthand
Accounting
Secretarial

TENNIS AND GOLF'
PROVEFAVORITES
Physical Education Department
Conducts Class Survey
of Sports.
Tennis and golf proved to be the
most popularsport in a survey con-
ducted in the required gymnasium
classes Monday and Tuesday. A
straw vote was taken in all the
classes the first two days of this
week to determine what sport stu-
dents enjoyed most, and then the
Physical e d u c a t i o n department
plans to arrange the classes and
schedules so that the students may
take part in the sports they desire.
Two hundred votes were cast in'
favor of tennis and the tennis
classes have been arranged for ten
o'clock, eleven o'clock two and three
o'clock on Monday and Friday and
on Tuesday and Thursday. The
classes will be divided into three
sections, one for beginners, one for
intermediate players and a third
for advanced students.
Golf received 70 votes. The be-
ginners class in golf will be at ten
o'clock on Monday and Wednesday
and at the same hour on Tuesday
and Thursday. Classes for advanc-
ed players will be at 2 o'clock on
Monday and Wednesday and on
Tuesday and Thursday at the same
hour.

COLLEGES HOLD
RIFLETOURNEY
Michigan Association Sponsors
Discussion Held in Angell
Hall Yesterday. .
Intercollegiate" telegraphic rifle
meets have been carried on thel
past weeks by the women's rifle
team. The results of the meet of
the week-end of March 14 have just
been obtained in which the Michi-
gan team won one match and lost
three. The colleges competed a-
gainst were South Dakota State
College, State College of Washing-
ton, De Pauw University and Car-
negie Technical School.
The highest score of that meet
was made by South Dakota State
College and State College of Wash-
ington both shooting 497. De Pauw
University had a score of 492, Uni-
versity of Michigan 490, and the
Carnegie Technical School team
488.
Results of the second meet shot
the week-end of March ' 21 have
just been telegraphed to the Phys-
ical education department. In this
meet the women's rifle team com-
peted against Michigan State Col-
lege, University of Missouri, Uni-
versity of Nebraska and Northwest-
ern University.
The University of Nebraska won

ALPHA ALPHA GAMMA ART EXHIBIT
OPENS AT ARCHITECTURAL SCHOOL
Show Represents Class-Projects structive in its architectural sug-
Undertaken During Year's gestions.
Course of Study. Miss Martin also contributes a
design for a stained glass window.
By Cile Miller. This piece of work in no way com-
Under the auspices of Alpha Al- pares with her other contribution,
pha Gamma, the national archi- The Dutch Tea Room plan. It is
tectural sorority, an exhibit of marked by the medieval stiffness
varying types of art work is now and conventions without any of the
being held on the second floor of sympathetic and aesthetic interpre-
the Architectural school. Contribu.. tation which is characteristic of
' tions have been sent in by all the that period of stained glass win-
i national chapters. dows. Miss Martin's work is too
Of the water colors offered we earthy to follow in the medieval
find many different techniques and yconventions. The stiffness is in no
styles represented. One of the most way justified by an ethereal quality
interesting of water colors was a as it is in most medieval work.
village scene by Margaret E. Zealer Life figures, in pastel, crayons
of the University of California. Miss and charcoal, and Christmas card
Zealer works out her composition designs made up the rest of the ex-
in a suggestive rather than real- hibit. All of the recent develop-
istic style, a sketch here, a line and ments in the Christmas card fads
bulk there and we have a very con- were represented from the long lean
vincing scene. Hers is the style animals stretched out in futuristic
which can be daringly indefinite dashes to the patternized wood-
because of a mastery of medium. cuts of anything and everything.
Of a much more unconventional ==-1==
trend and echoing something of the Op E
modernist swing, we find a water- pen venings
color done in washes of black and COLLEGE BE.
gray tone relieved only by the un-
painted white spaces which are well SPECIAL EAS
patternized. The subject is a land-I MarceI Effect
scape of knarled and grotesquelywh Ringlet End
awry trees which span a br o k wt g s
- knotty with misshapen stones.
, The Michigan chapter is repre-
I sented only by architectural and
1!whimsically uninteresting plans for
- children's theater curtains. Out of STY
Ithe architectural designs the only /
f one of particular value is the plan You w
for a Dutch Tea Room by Eliza- hN eHem
- beth Martin. The completeness of
her design, and the excellency of
1 her details without any superfluity
s of detail is very commendable. De- Nrodiste Shoppe Dial 2-1129
signs for iron gratings, unusual
brass door-latches, and original
hanging lamps, each one decidedly - -
individual and yet all of them uni-
) fled by the Dutch style, make the
lay-out attractive as well as con-'

Jean Botsford,
Vice president of the Women's
Athletic Association who was elect-
ed chairman of next year's Junior
Girls' Play at a meeting of the
sophomore class held yesterday af-
ternoon in the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Houses Entertain
Faculty Members
tw-ctc t~~k~ ~~ r ®r ' ur

umcers L-tecLLons Intee-st WL Archery classes will be held at this meet by a sc
Sororities. eleven o'clock and at three o'clock sity of Missouri
Ion Monday and Friday and at two with a score of4
Faculty dinners appear to be the o'clock on Tuesday and Thursday. Michigan s c o re
chief social interest of the sororities Outdoor sports including , hiking, State 482, and N
for the early part of this week. camping, and possibly canoeing versity defaulted.
Delta Gamma entertained several will be held on Tuesday and Thurs-
ebr of eftyta foral 'day afternoon from three to five PRINCEON UN
members of the faculty at a formal o'clock. are being madef
dinner last evening. The guests Second semester sophomores may of a Freshman
dinner last evening. The guests were J take horse back riding for credit. response to a tele
Prof. Solomon F. Gingerich and However anyone who wishes to ride ceived here, in w
Mrs. Gingerich, Prof. Arthur E. may enter the classes which will 1934 squad challe:
B be held at 3:30 Monday and Wed- a game.
Boak and Mrs. Boak, Prof. ArthurI nesday afternoons and at the same - '__
Hackett and Mrs. Hackett, Prof. time Tuesday and Thursday.
Benjamin D. Meritt and Mrs. Mer- Anyone may register for these
itt, and Prof. Bruce M. Donaldson. classes whether or not they are
The Men's and Women's Glee clubs taking gymnasium.
are giving a dance together at the Swimming and rhythm classes the change of ad
Delta Gamma house on Saturday will continue and any freshman Trust Co. onM
evening. interested in preparing for the ShoeRoom
Delta Zeta gave a rushing dinner Freshman Pageant may enter a hpp,'
in honor of six guests last MondayI rhythm class at ten, two or three MISS FRANCIS
evening at the chapter house. o'clock on Monday and Friday.-1111
Alpha Delta Pi held, elections of
this year's officers recently. Ethel
Arscott, '32, was elected president,
Irma Bobertz, '33, vice-president,
Marjorie Millar, '32, recording sec-
retary, Barbara Ann Fisher, '33,
treasurer. Alpha Delta Pi is enter-
tainingeight rushees for dinner to-
night. Mrs. Carl Coe and Mrs. Pres-
ton James are to be guests at the
dinner also.
Kappa Kappa Gamma is giving a
formal dinner tonight in honor of
Dean Alice Lloyd, Miss Ethel Mc-
Cormick, Miss Jeannette Perry, and F i a ,r
Mrs. Byrl Fox Bacher.tP ,

ore of 493, Univer-
came in second
492, University of
e d 487, Michigan
orthwestern Uni-
IVERSITY-Plans
for the formation
Rugby squad in
gram recently re-
hich the Harvard
rnges the Tigers tc

- -;

EII

ANNOUNCEMENT
of
ddress of the Observatory Beauty Shoppe to the Ann Arbor
lain and Huron, under the ifame of the Delmar Beauty
301.
S WIEMER PHONE 22600

~son 9S
SHOWING
d Saturday

New
Easter
Footwear
Hundreds of pairs of New
Spring Styles for your ap-
proval.
A smart new T-strap in
Blonde and Black Kid ...
$6.00.
-O~

Polo Cameishair and Travel Coats

Are The Thing Now!
The new authentic coat modes may be
seen at Jacobson's. Outstanding for imme-
diate wear are the Polo Coat of beige, swag-
gerly belted and pocketed . . . the Camels-
hair coat with its wide lapels and many new
style features combine sports, semi-dress or
general utility all in one.
7 2975
and

'CV
". L
" }ti1t
\i
'...1"i
'C.':

4

'%
t .

013t

kik

,Spring Collection
Coats Trimmed with Flat Fur
Coats with the New Cowl Necklines
Scarf-Collared Coats
Materials in the new spongey Woolens in black and
the newer colors.

T T -W -V -V -V -9- -v-

T-v lv

A beautiful Blonde or Black

with Genuine
med Pump .
Genuine
W atersnake
Ties and Pumps
New Blonde
and Black Kids

Reptile trim-
. . $8.00.

$19.75 to $39.75

$5

New Easter Suits

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