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March 25, 1931 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-25

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25, 1931

THE CMICHIGAN DAIL P

PA'G'.

~0~4

HUMAN RELATIONS
PARLEYS PROMOTE
Conference Here to be Similar
Country During Year.
to Those Held Throughout
ALL FAITHS TAKE PART

Workman Charged With Federal Syndicalism ( [} Rf(l[*
n Alleged Attempt to Wreck Navy Dirigible L
/ ^0f_ K yy;S~r NV I-: .I (f HIGH SC'HOOL ti
~V"-
S _Spectacular Success Pf Camp
f S V'}of1 Camp
5 }..Due to Intensive
Training.

Journalism Students Judge Beauty Contest
in Battle Creek; ConsideresI Connoisseurs

Clinchy, Faris, Franklin,
Lead Discussions at

Willi

Session.
Announcement of this week's Hu-
man Relations Parley that will h
led by Dr. Everett Clinchy, Prof.
Ellsworth Faris, and Dr. Leo Fran%.-
lin, recalls other seminars hel :1
throughout the country during the
last year to combat religious preju-
dice.
New York City, Baltimore, North-
western university, the University
of Alabama, Bucknell university
and other institutions have spon-
sored good will conferences led by
outstanding representatives of Pro-
testantism; Judaism and Catholi-
cism.
Noted Men Take Part.
At a session held last December
at the Hotel McAlpin in New York
City, Lieutenant-Governor Herbert'
Lehman, P. J. O'Connell, and Chan-
cellor Brown acted as co-leaders of
a discussion that included such men
as Rev. John Haynes Holmes, Felix
Warburg, Justice Joseph M. Pros-
kauer, and Prof. Reinhold Niebuhr,
who spoke on "Human Relations."
Dr. Samuel M. Cavert gave rea-
son for existence of religious be-
liefs at the seminar held in Bal'ti-
more when he revealed that "if I
had been born in the house next
door on the south, I should doubt-
less be a Catholic today-if born a
block further west, a member of the
synagogue. I am a Protestant for
the same reasons that I am a Dem-
ocrat--as the Tesult of heritage and
early training that gave me a mind
set in those directions." Prof. Hor-
nell Hart, of Bryn Mawr's depart-
ment of sociology, presided over the
Baltimore meeting.
Calls Sessions Useful
Indication of the utility of a sen-
inar came out when Father Wheel-
er, head of the Loyola school and
priest at St. Ignatius church, said
that the Johns Hopkins meeting
gave him his first chance to hear
of Judaism from a Jew.
The Daily at Evanston, Ill., said
last :December editorially, that it
marked "in red" the Human Rela-
tions Parley as. -an outstanding
event in the college life of North-
western. It remarked that "the
conference is remembered not so
much for the great understanding
that was created at its sessions, but
for the stimulus to individual at-
tempts to achieve understanding of
human differences."
In the South, the Universities of
Alabama, Georgia and South Caro-
lina arranged meetings for the dis-
semination of all religious doctrines
on common ground, while at Dick-
inson college in Pennsylvania, Pres-
ident D. A. Robertson ventured the
opinion, when approached on the
subject of religious tolerance, that
carefully in terms of 'individuals'
rather than 'groups'."

The national high school orchjes-
tra and band ca~mp at Interloch~en,
Mich, is praised in the current :is-,
sue of the Maga:ine of Michigan, as
"America's Music Capital."
The article points out that the
spectacular success of the camp 'has
been due to the -act that for ,the
la t your years the best high school
talent that the United States co l
oroduce has been brought together
for eight weeks intensive trainig.
Prof. Joseph E. Maddy, of t] rn
School of Music, is quoted to tl ie
effect that the camp has becon ie
the "focal point and coveted goat1'
for more than 1,500,000 boy and girl I
muicians in the United States;,
who constitute the membership in
45,000 high school orchestras and
30,000 high school bands. Professor
Maddy is president and organizer

Mauirer's Class Remains to Act
as Pulchrih'dc Judges
' When Work Is Done.
1$tudents in the journalism de-
partment nay journey afar to as-
sit in editing the department's
piper, thf. Journalist, but that
doesn't keep them from judging
beauty shows at night.
C That is just what happened Mon-
day when Wesley Maurer's class
motored to a newspaper plantin
Battle Creek to write headlines and
to see how a real,honest-to good-
ness paper comes off the press.
The newspaper on that eventful
day was on the verge of launching;
a local beauty contest, but as the

zero hour a approached they lacked
two judges. Two journalists offer-
ed their see:vgyes, and were accepted
on the gro *mds that they knew 'one
of the cc iTestants.
Theyr ,. mained in the city{ after
the othc jstudents had dep'Arted for
A znA? >or, obtained spe vial seats
in the c'ity's leading thea'are togeth-
er u" Va.~ three other ?,udges, and
were 'atroduced to the a udience as
"conr'oisseurs of femAine pulchri-
tu e
hbile the beaut.&s paraded be-
e them in bearh attire the jud-
ge s and audienc.6 were entertained
a hone-talont show which in-
(I iuded a sister act, and a forceful
poem rendered by the city's fore-
'most declairmer.'

Daily Official Buletin
(Continued from Page 8)
be the first reading of the report
on a curriculum change. The meet-
inging will be held in the A.I.Ch.E.
chapter room, 3201 East Engineer-
ing Building.
Faculty Women's Club: Tea at
the home of Mrs. Alexander G.
Ruthven, 815 South University Ave-
nue, Thursday, March 26, 3:30 to
5:30 p.m.
Seniors -- Engineering College :
Mr. Albert J. Parker will talk to the
seniors in the Engineering College
on Thursday, March 26, at 4:00 p.
m., in Room 311 West Engineering

Associated Press Photo

Paul F. Kassey (inset) who was arrested in Akron, Ohio, on a
charge of federal syndicalism by federal authorities who claimed that
hp had nlntted to wre k then i (nt nav dAipriP Akron nn wunl dr r

construction by omitting rivet.
of the ship. The Akron is shov
PEARSE ilWILL Cl
SER HIE[S OFTAL,
Professor of Zoology at E
University to Give Thre
Illustrated Lectures.
Dr. A. S. Pearse, professor o
ology at Duke university, will d
er a series of three illustrated
tures April 2 and 3, Prof.!Peter
kleberg, of the University der
ment of zoology, announced ye
day.
Formerly with the zoology
partments of the Universitie
Michigan and Wisconsin, Dr. P
is noted for his work in eco
parasitology, and animal beha
During the last two years he
acted as exchange professo
Japan, and has been special in
igator for the bureau of fisher
The first of his lectures, "T
cal Nature," will be open to
public at 4:15 o'clock Thurqda
Natural Science auditorium.
other talks, to be given inz
2116, 'Natural Science building
fore biology staffs and students
concern the "Migration of An
from Ocean to Land and F
water," and "Parasites of Nig
Rodents."g

ga n y g e w n.tllie .J.Iut ., eof the camp.
s while he was employed in the building Appro.imately 300 of the best
wn in its hangar. musicians now studying in high
schools will gather at Interlochen
TJune 28 fcr the opening of the
I BILLIARD ARTIST fourth national high school orches-
T SHOW TRICK tra and bard camp. Professor Mad-
TO HTO TRICKS idy stated that "by Monday morning'
. . of that week the three major ac-
Charles C. Peterson, b iii i1a r d 'tivities-orchestra, band and chor-
freak-shot artist, will give a per- us-will have been organized and
formance in the Union billiard in full swing. By Tuesday, both.
)uke ro at 7:30 o'clock Thursday major and minors will be at -uork.
roomat :30o'clck hurdayA visitor arrivirng at camp on .Wed-
e night which will be open to all nesday will probably imagine we
members. showing their U n i o n have been "'full blast' for months."
d cards. Peterson will demonstrate
. difficult shots in both straight rail Granger's Dtance Hil
lee- and three cushion. to Open Under Smith
Following the exhibition, members
SOk- of the Union will be given free in- Under the management of Dougj
part- struction by Peterson in all vari- Smith, formerly of Detroit, Gran-
ster- eties of billiard play. He is well ger's ballroom, 605-607 E. Huron
known in his field, having perform- street, will reopen tonight as a pub-
ed before hundreds of celebrities I lie dance hall.
de-and on vaudeville circuits. Smith, who has taken a lease on

i

Building, regarding practical plans
WTCOLLEGE O USE of investment for graduates. Mem-
SQUESTIONNAIRES hbers of the faculty are also invited
r. to attend.
Will Study Time Spent on Work All-Campus Forum: Ira M. Smith,
and Mental Troubles. Registrar of the University, will
___ es. speak on "Our Present System of
Shepard Would Favor Caipital Marking," Thursday afternoon at
Punishment if it Really / Questionnaires are to be distri- I 4:15 in Room D, Alumni Memorial
Deterred Crime. [' buted to the students at Detroit Hall.
(Continued from Page 1 ), municipal college to determine the Wesleyan Guild: Dr. Frederick
1.)een irritated beyond self co: ntrol. amount of time spent in work, B. .Fisher will hold his second in-
He stated that he would; be in campus activities, and recreations formal student discussion group at
favor of capital punishmer At if he ' Wesley Hall on Thursday at 4 a'-
thought that it would det er mur- and to find out whether students clock. All students are cordially in-
ders. However, this wouldj not be (supect that they have any men- vited to attend.
the case because the prMfessional
murderer valued all life, including t!.l disorders. The results will be
his own, very lightly, and the mur- :added to the files of the
ders that are caused by constantdordinary
goading are commited without any collegiate statistics. WASHED, SCREENED
thought as to the consequences. The set of questions has been ALL SIZES
The Foster bill was strongly op- compiled by Prof. Preston H. Scott,(- CALL
posed by Dr. Forsythe who stat'd of the public speaking department
that he did not believe that Mkh-a the Cl ei n7075, 7112 OR 21014
igan was competent to handle at the College of the City of De- K , GL
a measure in view of 'the -ax en- troit. KILLINS GRAVEL CO
forcement of other laws ir. the
state. - -
"I want to say that und c1. exist- FRATERNITY JEWELRY
ing conditions and crime laws in A TYARTY FAVORS
general I submit to you his fact.
that the presentation o a death ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
penalty bill to the peopl of Mi
igan, is an insult, he st e CARL F. BAY
Professor Levi, in the, concluding JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
lecture, said that he believed the Nickels Arcade
capital punishment b'.11 to be unjust
because society, whi =--ref uses= th"-°--,- -
individual the righ to kill, should ________ _
not assume this ri'nht for itself.
-----~~

I

3s of
earse
)logy,
avior.
has
r in
vest-
ies.
ropi-
the
ty, in
His
room
, be-
s, will
imals
resh-
erian

Members of Glider
Section Pass Tests

Mhe building, willn hoi dances every
night except Sunday and Monday.
Floyd Snyder and his Club Ambas-
sador dance band have been se-
cured to play. Smith, who is a pro-

Three members of the glider sec- fesional entertainer, wall act as
tion of the Aeronautical society master of ceremonies.
Smith plans to open a dancing
passed tests for a limited commer- school, to be operated under his
cial pilot license held at Wayne own supervision. He was formerly
county airport on the Middlet alt with the Fisher school of dancing,
road. Inspector Orchid, of the de- in Detroit, he said.
partment of commerce, in charge
of the tests announced yesterday. WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY-
Showing proficiency at perform- Administrative officials of the
ing cross-wind turns, spot landings, school are continuing to hope that
360-degree turns, and other aerial a $350,000 slash proposed by the
feats, Thomas C. Hill, '32E, Harold state senate will not be incorpo-
E. Emmons, '33, and E. Donald Pal- rated into the university budget
mer, '31E, were awarded licenses. for 1931-33..

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'I

School of
Music
Concerts
(No Admission Charge)
THE VARSITY BAND, Nicholas
Falcone, Conductor, Thursday,
March 26, 8:15, Hill Auditorium.
ROBERT CRANDALL, Pianist,
BU R N E T T E BRADLEY, So.
iprano, students' recital, Friday, i
March 27, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, Violin-
ist and MABEL ROSS RHEAD, H
Pianist, faculty concert, Sunday
March 29, 4:15 Mendelssohn
Theatre.
KATE KEITH FIELD, Gradua-
tion recital, Wednesday, April 1,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
I STUDENTS' RECITAL, students
of Thelma Newell, Violinist and
Lucile Garham Scho en feld,
Pianist, Wednesday, April 1, 7:45,
School of Music Auditorium.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organ-
ist Faculty Concert (Good Friday
Music) Friday, April 3, 4:15, Hill Ii
Auditorium.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,I
Faculty Concert, Sunday, April 5,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
BERTHA HILDEBRAND, Pi-I
anist, Student's Recital, Tuesday,
April 7, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
STANLEY FLETCHER, Pianist,
Student's Recital Thursday, April{
9, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
THELMA NEWELL, Violinist,
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist, Fac-
ulty concert, Sunday, April 26,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
'Faculty Concert, Wassily Besekir-
sky, Violinist, Hanns Pick, Violon-
celliif' Joseph Brinkman, Pianist,
Sunday, May 3, 4:15, Mendels-

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