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March 24, 1931 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-24

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TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 1931

THE MICHIGAN

D A LY

EFFIGEROUTLINES
CHOWJTH OF FRENCH
DRMA IN ADRS
Literary College Dean Delivers
Talk Over University
Radio Station.
GIVES FIRST LECTURE
Influences of Religious ' Plays,
Advent of Renaissance
Are Discussed.
The development of the French
drama was outlined yesterday t'y
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
ary college, in an address delivere
from the campus broadcasting stu-
dio. The talk was the first of a
series which is being presented
this week by faculty members on
French topics.
Dean Effinger pointed out that
during the middle ages, France, in
common with the rest of Europe
had a religious drama written most-
ly in Latin, and quantities of com-
edies of various kinds written in
the language of ordinary speech.
National Literature Grew.
"With the advent of the renais-
sance in the sixteenth century,
however, conditions changed," he
said "France found herself for the
first time a strongly organized na-
tion and one of her first ambitions1
was to create a national literature
in the national language. Francez
in her ambition desired not only tot
equal that literature, but to sur-
pass it, and much of the sixteenth1
century was spent in imitatingt
classical models, chiefly Latin."
Dean Effinger saict further thatr
the drama of the seventeenth den-1
tury was marked by less confusion$
and more logic.1
"As a result," he said, "the French
classical drama made its appear-
ance. The formula for its composi-
tion which had been slowly devel-e
oping for several decades, finallyk
took definite outline about 1632."
RADIO TODAY '
Prof. Rene Talmon, of the
rrench department, will give a
lesson in French pronunciation,
at 2 o'clock this afternoon from
the campus broadcasting studio.
It was suggested during the six-t
teenth century, Dean Effinger said,x
that comedy and tragedy should1
be mingled,, that prose shQuld .be
substituted for poetry and that(
contemporary subjects should be
used. There was also a desire to get,
away from the cool self control of
the seventeenth century and in-
ject some of that emotionalism of
which the eighteenth century wasc
so fond.
Many Authors Popular. t
"During the period of the devel-1
opment of the serious modern dra-
ma there were many authors who
won popuJar favors. 'Scribes occu-
pied the center of the stage during
the first half of the nineteenth
century, and his comedies and dra-
mas were acclaimed in theatres in
all parts of the world. In the sec-
ond half of the century Labiche,
the author of many light comedies,
and Sardou, creater of the picture
drama, widely known in America,
are deserving of special mention,"
he said.
From the time in the seventeenth
century when Louis XIV first sub-
sidized a theatre in Paris, the prin-
ciple of governmental support for
the theatre has been maintained.

Napoleon, he said, on his way back
from Moscow wrote the rules and
regulations which still govern the
Theatre Francais, and French pub-
lic sentiment is strongly behind the
principle involved. As a result
France has a body of significant
dramatic literature which repre-
sents continual growth and devel-
opment, and which excites world
admiration, he concluded.
TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of machines.
Our equipment and per-
s o n n e 1 are considered
among the best in the State. The result
of twenty years' careful building.
O. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615
L a

THEODORE DREISERi
A 'GOOD FELL(
Renounce Intentions of Combt
With Noble Prize
Winner.
KANSAS CITY, Mar. 23.-(AD)-
Theodore Dreiser has turned from
the role of "the man who slapped
Sinclair Lewis."
The author of "An American
Tragedy," here Sunday night, re-
nounced any intentions of further
combat with the red-headed Nobel
prize winner and said he was "real-
ly a good fellow."
Referring to his slapping of
Lewis at a gathering of New York
literari, Thursday night, Dreiser
said.
"I couldn't sit there and swallow
his insults. I don't like being cursed
and accused of plagarism. I've an-
swered that charge enough."
Asked if Lewis didn't turn the
other cheek to receive the second
blow, the novelist commented that
PUBLIC CONTRACTSN
REACH HIGCH TOTL
Sui of $145,292,508 Is Largest
Yet Reported; Increase
Over Last Year.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 23.-(/-)--
During the first week of Spring,
public works contracts swelled to
$145,292,508, the largest total yet
reported to the President's employ-
ment committee.
At the same time, the bureau of
labor statistics reported construc-
tion totalling $100,311,856 had been
authorized in 342 cities during Feb-
ruary. This was a decrease of 2.5
per cent from January permits of
$102,878,087, but the decrease was
less than the 4.3 per cent for the
same period last year.
The public works contracts, in-
cluding postoffices and other Fed-
eral buildings, state and municipal
building, colleges, h o s p i t a 1 s,
churches, bridges, highways and
streets, sewer construction and oth-
er work of this type, were let in 38
states and the District of Columbia.,
Zeuch to Play Organ
at Recital Tomorrow
The usual Wednesday organ reci-
tal will be given at 4:15 o'clock to-
morrow in Hill auditorium by Wil-
liam Zeuch, of Boston.
"Mr. Zeuch's playing," said Dr.
Charles Sink, president of the
School of Music, in making the an-
nouncement, "is characterized by
virility, nicety of phrasing, and
strong rhythmic swing. His annual
series of recitals in Boston is un-
doubtedly the most popular of any
similar series in that famous cen-
ter of culture, and the Ann Arbor
public is assured of a rare treat
when he plays here tomorrow."
DE PAUW UNIVERSITY-Twenty
automatic candy machines have
been placed in buildings on the
campus, in order to raise money
for maintenance of the band.

TERMS LEWIS T T TENNIS RACKETS M1
)W' IN RECENT TALK [1[JJ |U |urrui AS OLD SOL S
ID PIOTTVA Backsteps .Fail. to .Halt. Balls
UU IUUL~ dIgLJI L of Early Enthusiasts
on Ferry Field.
Communists Deny Paul Kassay
Belongs to Their Party, The click of tennis rackets can
However. . again be heard on South Ferry
Ifield. Many student enthusiasts-
AKRON, 0., Mar. 23.--()- Al- some even wearing shorts-after
though denying that he was a mem- confining their play to the indoor
ber of their party, Communists to- courts for the winter season are
day rallied to the defense of Paul already taking advantage of the
K. Kassay, charged with plotting outdoor courts in order to swing
> s-: the destruction of the navy dirigi- into action in the open air.
ble Akron being built here. Yesterday found all but the clay
Miss Jennie Cooper of Cleveland, courts filled with exponents of the
district organizer of the Interna- game, some good and mostly bad.
tional Labor Defense committee, Even backstops seemed to be in-
said she would come here today to sufficient to halt the enthusiasm
post a $40,000 property security to shown by many who were vainly
obtain Kassay's release under $20,- trying to regain last season's form.
000 bond. Kassay's arrest, she said, But regardless of the quality of
was a "well-organized plan to dis- tennis demonstrated by the first
credit the Communist party." players of the season, the sound
SDemonstrations will be held m of play on the open court, seemed
Associated Press Photo Cleveland, Youngstown, T o1 e d o, to inaugurate spring more forceful-
Theodore Dreiser. Akron and other Ohio cities to
"arouse sympathy in behalf of Kas- Court Fines Resident
"if I remember rightly it was the say," Miss Cooper said. hSpeedinge
same cheek I slapped both times." Kassay's release also was sought.
"But that affair is closed," he on habeas corpus proceedings today
said. "Lewis has a reputation for by Miss Yetta Land, attorney for Arrested Suncay, Robert Warner,
becoming offensive. I like Lewis the International Labor Defense 1309 Henry street, appeared yester-
and I believe Lewis likes me." committee. She likewise termed the I day morning to answer a charge
"I admire some of his writings. charges a "frame-up." of driving 35 miles an hour on
Even 'Elmer Gantry' is a pretty Assistant C o u n t y Prosecutor Packard street. Warner paid a fine
good story, although it is a bit raw. George R. Hargraves announced he of $10 and $4.55 court costs.
'Arrowsmith' is a good story, too. would ask the county grand jury to ~-
Paul de Kruif, who gave Lewis the indict Kassay on a charge of cri_- _ --
material, first asked me to write inal syndicalism today. He also
the book, but I didn't have time." said he wanted to question Mrs.
Dreiser is flying to Hollywood to Kassay. I ye F o MC
assist in the film dramatization of
"An American Tragedy." POLICE DISS
BOYS FROM TRIP UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-
Free transportation between cam-
W hat's-- pus and golf course is offered to
Detroit Boys Reach Ann Arbor student members of a local coun-
- on Way to California. ry club here, the club running
Go__g_,pecial buses for this service.
Sergeant Norman Cook says it's JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY
'..Jf the only sure sign that sprng is -Failure to attend weekly assem-
really here. blies resulted in the suspension of
Anyway he didn't seem very cx- 176 members of the sophomore and
THEATRES cited when officers brought in five freshman classes by the student
..Majestic-Joe E. Brown and Win- Detroit boys yesterday who had council.
nie Lightner in "Sit Tight." started on a trip to California that
Michigan-"The Royal Family of ended abruptly in Ann Arbor when UNIVERSITY OF IN D I A N A-
Broadway" with Ina Claire and police found little difficulty in con- Last week 12 freshmen pledges de-
Frederick March. vincing the ragged urchins, none cided that they were being treated
of whom was more than 15 years tddta hywr en rae
Wuerth-"The Seas Beneath" too roughly and fled to a place of
Wurh" old, that maybe it would be bitter ls asi.Te eundt
with George O'Brien and Marion to go back home. less hardship. They returned to
Lessing. The boys, Stanley Madej, 4650 the fraternity one week later and
Central avenue, Joe Madej, his bra- worms have proved too depleting,
GENERAL ther, of the same address, Anthony reports say.
Lecture--Dr. C. G. Kulkarni, on.
"Mother India;" 8:15 o'clock, Nat_ Jablowski, 4342 Fifty-second street,
' Henry Machcinski, 4420 Fifty- irst HRAD UNIVE -
ural Science auditorium. Hen d aterkr, 4 651 Guards have been stationed at all
Forum-Prof. J. F. Shepard and I exits of the library here to see that
Rev. E. J. Forsythe on "Capital ty-first street, were put i the no books are carried away. Book
t Punishment;" 4:15 o'clock, room city s big red touring car and taken thereby averted financial ruin only
231, Angell hall. to the detention pe, while Ser- after much persuasion and many
geant Cook called up the Detroit n.promises of less rough treatment.
police department.
Man Run Down by Car

AKE APPEARANCE
MILES IN APPROVAL

)ther Collee<

He Is Tryinjg to Start
James Baird, 110 Twelfth St., was
pinned between his car and one be-
longing to R. C. Davidter, of Man-
chester, when he cranked his auto
after he had parked it on State
street Saturday afternoon. The car
began to move as Baird cranked
it, pushing it against the second
vehicle, which sustained a damaged
fender when it collided with a
parked truck.

S
r

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY-
A field trip, calling for more than
2,000 miles of travel to the most
interesting biological regions of
West Virgina will be taken this
summer by "roaming students" in
biology and zoology here.

I

"a

N -

11 .1

WASHINGTON
SHOP
107 East Liberty
Clean and Block
Your Hat
for Spring

DR. C. G. KULKARNI
Lecture on
"MOTHER INDIA"
NATURAL SCIENCE
AUDITORIUM
TONIGHT AT 8:15

Acade
Barber'Shop
NICKELS ARCADE

_ I

_' I

BIN

Always
Presenting
Finer Flowers
ANN ARBOR
FLORISTS, INC.
122 E. Liberty Phone 6215

PNEUMONIA
and similar diseases are often contracted from impurities
in drinking water. Arbor Springs Water undergoes fre-
quent and thorough inspection and analysis-it invariably
is proclaimed to be absolutely pure.
We can also supply you with chemically pure distilled water.
Be Safe-Call 8270
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER CO.
416 West Huron Phone 8270

i

I.-

We Call for and Deliver M
Phone 7373

3

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t~ql, ยข
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t
.

GIVE CANDY AT
EASTER
Special boxes by
Gilbert and Johnston's
Easter novelties for your party
The Betsy Ross Shop
13-15 Nickels Arcade
Pack, wrap, and mail

THE NEXT TIME you're hungry
around bedtime, stop in at the

SAND-GRAVEL
WASHED, SCREENED
ALL SIZES
CALL
7075, 7112 OR 21014
KILLINS GRAVEL CO.

We Deliver

Dial 5931

I

i

i /1
h m

FOUNTAIN AND LUNCH SERVICE
WE DELIVER
From 10 a. m. to 11 p. m.

campus restaurant and enjoy a
bowl of golden - crisp Kellogg's
Corn Flakes with milk or cream.
Scatter on some sliced banana, if
you lke. What a treat !And how
sensible! For Kellogg's are so extra
easy to digest they help you sleep
sounder and feel fitter!

0

The most popular
cereals served in the
dining-rooms of Ameri-

A/n 02"9

h

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