100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 17, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 1931

, THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 1931 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

av MWAvAMW ==Wkl I!M
vrV T)WW 90:=o

... 3 - -

Seniors

Don

Caps

and

Gowns

for

Annual

WOMEN FOLLOW TRHDTIO O IFMAFCH
ACROSS CAMPUSA9ND ATTENDANCE AT
PEROMNEOf 'CAME THE DAWN!'

More Than 450 Seniors Join in
Annual 'Ceremonies; Are
Honored by Juniors.
ORIGINAL SONG IS SUNG
Festivities Are Held in League
Building; Lucille Strauss
Heads Committee.
Beginning the traditional round
of festivities for the senior women,
the annual Senior Supper was fol-
lowed last night by the customary
march across the diagonal, and the
special opening performance of the
Junior Girls' Play. .
This was the first occasion upon
which the senior women appeared
in caps and gowns, and 470 were
present at the banquet, which was
held in the two lounges and the
concourse on the second floor of the
League. A special song, the words
of which were written by Francis
Jennings, '31, was sung to the tune
of "I'm Just a Dealer in Futures,"
from last year's play, in honor of
the junior women.
Seniors Enjoy Play.
The performance of "Came the
Dawn!", the twenty-seventh pro-
duction presented by the juniors,
was enthusiastically received by
the senior;, in whose honor it was
given. The whole lower floor of the
Lydia Mendelssohn theatre was oc-
cupied by the guiests of honor, who
acorded a great ovation to the au-
thors, cast, choruses, and director
of 'the play.
Levy and Graham Lead.
In their march across campus,
the juniors were attended by Jean
Levy and Agnes Graham, junior
guards of honor, and ten assistants;
Agnes Davis, Louise Breakey, Eve-
lyn Currah, Sarah Bond, Dorothy
Col, Donna Jones, 'Winifred Hart-
man, Isabelle . Jenkins, Barbara
Wright; and Elizabeth Robertson.
Lucile Strauss acted as general
chlirmaii jo he supper, and was
aQssited by' Helen- Donine, Jane
Yearnd,' Marjorie MeCdung;,Eliza-
beth Wood, and Hattie Kreye.
Dr. Jiminez Explains
Types of Hay Fever
"Hay fever is not more common
among women than men, nor is it
ni.re susceptible to one race of
people than another," declared Dr.
Buenaventura Jimenez, physician
at the Health Service and assist-
ant in the Sensitization Clinic.
"There are two types of hay fever,"
he added, "the early type known
asrose h fever and the late type
knlown as hay fever."
'UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO -
Cotton will reign supreme on the
Colorado campus this spring. Wo-
men have decided to wax patriotic
and support the cotton industry by
foreswearng silk. They are abetted
In this plan by the university Sen-
ate, who not only sugests, but de-
mands that no woman depart from
thlis'new plan.

HOUSES TO MEET
IN PRELIMINARIES
Swimming Contest Is Tonight at
7:15 o'clock in Union Pool.
Entrants f r o m the following
houses will compete in the prelim-
inary swimming meet at 7:15 o'clock
tonight in the Union pool; Alpha
Delta Pi, Sigma Kappa, Kappa
Kappa Gamma, Helen Newberry,
and. Alpha Chi Omega.
The houses which will compete,
Thursday night are Alpha Gamma'
Delta, Jordan, Martha Cook, Adelia
Cheever, and Kappa Alpha Theta.
Preliminary contests will con-
tinue to be held every Tuesday and
Thursday nights until the night of
the final meet. Each house will
meet with three other houses, for
competition rather than elimina-
tion. Individual times are taken in
the preliminaries for each event,
and in the final meet the best times
of each event will be run. The to-
tal number in each event will de-
pend upon the number of entries
in the preliminaries.
The events consist of four strokes,
the crawl, side stroke, racing back
stroke, and breast stroke, and a re-
lay and diving contest.
Entrants in the meets are asked
to obtain admission cards and
swimming suits before coming to
the pool. Admission 'cards may be
obtained from the secretary in Bar-
bour gymnasium.

WOMEN PLAY OFF
PING-PONG GAMES
Tourney Progresses to Second
and Third Rounds.
First rounds of the ping-pong
tournament have been completed,
and second and third rounds are
now in progress, according to an
announcement by Marjorie Hunt,
'32, manager of the tournament.
The students who have won their
first rounds are Maxine Fischgrund,
'33, Helen Moore, '31, Jane Robin-
son,,'31, Margaret Seeley, '31, Laura
Sommer, '33, Dorothy Shapland, '34,
Mary McIntosh, '34, Agnes Graham,
'32, Helen Domine, '31, Esther
Loucks, '32, Sylvia Weiss, '32, and
Katherine Barnard, '33, Harriet
T ow n s e n d, '32, and Lenore Le-
IGendre, '34.,
Those who won their first rounds
have been paired off again and will
play the final rounds within the
next few weeks.
Entrants who do not play off
their rounds at the time that has
been assigned to them will be auto-
matically dropped from the tourna-
ment, Miss Hunt announced. Those
who have not yet played off the
first rounds of the tournament can
still enter, playing both the first
and second rounds before the 'end,
of the present week. If they do not
finish.the second round this week,
their names will be crossed off the
list.
The two tables in Barbour gym-
nasium and the table in the Ath-
letic building are available to the
players. Students are asked to re-
cord their scores on the bulletin
board in Barbour gymnasium im-
mediately after their games.
Any players interested in a
doubles tournament should see Miss
Marie Hartwig of the physical edu-
cation faculty, in Barbour gymna-
sium.
Dr. M. Colby Explains
MemorialUndertaking
"Work on the Lucy Elliott Memo-
rial is the most important under-
taking since the Women's League,"
said Dr. Martha Colby. Dr. Colby is
still carrying on research work in
her field of psychology, but her
major interest is in this great work
for graduate fellowships. She is on
the committee of awards for -this
project.
Dr. Colby, although a noted psy-
chologist, finds her greatest joy in
music. It is to music and people
connected with it that she goes for
enjoyment.
at 7:15 are asked to sign their
names on the bulletin board in Bar-
bour gymnasium. The class on Tues-
day night is especially planned for
beginners, while the one on Thurs-
day is organized for experienced
riders. Both classes of riders may
join the Sunday morning group.

To be

of University at A.A.U.W.
Meeting in Boston.
Miss Alice Lloyd, Dean of Wo-
men, and Miss Joannette Perry, As-
sistant Dean, will be the official)
delegates to the convention of the,
American Association of Univer-,
sity Women as representatives of
the University of Michigan and of
the Ann Arbor chapter of the As-
sociation. The convention will be
held from April 8 to 11 in Boston.
Miss Maude Hagle as the presi-'
dent-elect, will attend the meetings
as a representative of the local
chapter. Miss Hagle is a teacher in
the Ypsilanti Normal School and
she is a sister of Mrs. Alexander
Ruthven.
Thre are seven other candidates
for positions as delegates, of whom
five or more will be selected. They
are Mrs. Edgar Kahn, wife of the,
assistant professor of surgery; Mrs.
Bernice Hannan, a graduate of
Michigan and at *resent a teacher
in the Ann Arbor High School; Mrs.
Shirley Smith, wife of the treasurer
of the University; Mrs. Dean Myers,
formerly the social head of Betsy
Barbour House; Miss Grace Powers,
superintendent of G r a y b r o o k
School; Mrs. John Brumm, wife of
the professor of journalism; and
Mrs. Max Winkler, formerly a
teacher at Vassar College and wife
of the former head of the German
department of the University.
RIDING BENEFITS
WOMEN'S HEALTH
Miss Vanessa Glenn Explains
Psychological Value.
"Riding as a sport for women has
a very definite physiological value,
as well as being a most pleasurable
recreation," state Miss Vanessa
Glenn of the Physical Education
department. As a relief from work,
no sport affords more stimulating
opportunities." It is Miss Glenn's
opinion that riding has several ad-
vantages, in that there are contin'-
ual possibilities of improvement.
"In mastering a horse, there is
always something new to learn,"
Miss Glenn continued, "and every
time one rides a different horse,
there is an enjoyable new elementI
of uncem tainty.
k JA

DEANS TO ATTEND
APRIL CONVENTION

Official Representatives

CHINESE FAMILY PROVES SUPERIOR
SOCIAL AND MORAL ORGANIZATION
Group Proves to be Foundation portunity even though hemoves to
of Chinese Democracy other communities, so he becomes
and Citizenship. an outcast. In this country it is
possible to move to a new locality
"Fr o the point of view of phys- and get a new start."
ical efficiency the western family Mr. King believes that more
is superior to the Chinese* family, togti ie otepsto
but from the moral and socialpoin thought is given to the position
of view the Chinese family is much and importance of the family n
better," said Benjamin King, grad- China than is given by Americans.
uate student f r o m Hangchow, He stated, 'Public opinion is a-
gainst the present family system in
China, in comparing family life in China, and wishes to combine the
China and the United States. good features of the Chinese fa-
"The Chinese family lacks physi- ily with the good features of the
cal efficiency," said Mr. King, "be- western family to form a Chinese
cause it prevents industrial devel- family system that is superior not
opment by discouraging individual only to the present Chinese sys-
initiative." To clarify this state- tern, but also to the present west-
ment he explained that in China ern system.
two or three generations form one ernsy__em.
household, governed by the Csia- Metal mines in South Dakota pro-
Csang, who is responsible for the duced $8,423, 776 in gold and 105,000
conduct and financial support of I ounces of silver in 1930, according
the entire group. 'to the United States bureau Hof
The head of the family is one of mines.
the senior members of the house- _ _
hold, chosen because of ability and
c h a r a c t e r, ,irrespective of sex.
"Every member of the group must Complete Line of
turn in his wages to the Csia-Csang
to be used for the good of all," con-
tinued Mr. King, "so, although the Une
tragedy of the struggle for exist- Victor
ence is avoided, and old peoples'
homes are unheard of, no one per- Victor
son is encouraged to try and get Mu
ahead."

_41

....................... - - --------- tiii~i ii

N TRA M U RAL:
.NTERCLASS:
NEWS
ll... l...l/ ! ..l. xx .l .! l.lThe m eeting of the fencing class,
which was postponed last Thursday
night, will be held at 7.:30 o'clock
tonight in Barbour gymnasium. This.
group, which has been organized
for students interested in fencing
as an extra-curricular activity,
meets regularly every Tuesday and
Thursday night. John Johnstone,
varsity fencing coach, is instructing
the class.
Open-hour dancing class, under
the instruction of Miss Emily Wnite,I
will meet at 7:15 o'clock tomorrow
night in. Sarah Caswell Angell hall
on the second floor of Barbour
gymnasium.
Students interested in riding on
Sunday mornings at 10 o'clock. or
on Tuesday and Thursday nights
TYPEWRITING
and
Pr MO GR P IGspeciality for twenty
er .

In speaking of the superiority of
the Chinese family, Mr. King re-
marked, that the family was the
foundation of the Chinese demo-
cracy, for through its training chil-
dren became good citizens. He add-
ed, "It is also the best agent for so-
cializing individuals, for the chil-
dren areataught to obey, to serve,
to love and to respect the rights
of their elders.
"A function ;of the Chinese fam-
ily that is unknown in the United
States is the checking of crime,"
observed Mr. King. "In China any-
one who has violated the law is
despised by his family, and forced
to leave home. Without the sup-
port of his family, he has no op-

All photographs used in pub-
licity for the Junior Girls' play
were furnished by Speddings
Studios.
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP

I

I

WE SEL
WE RENT
WE SERVICH
Tel. 2-2812

R adios
615 E. Williams

Ramona Beauty Shop
offers you
Shampoo and Finger Wave for SOc
Graduate Operators
PHONE 21478

I

I

What i You

SCHOOL OF MUSIC CONCERTS

(No Admission Charge)
HANNS PICK

Prowl
ators
314

pt service . . . Experienced oiler-
... . Moderate rates.
0. D. MORRILL
South State St. Phone 6615

NEWS of the NEW

at

" S
a/^
5
Irv;

Knitted Fashions
respond to the mode of ac-

Violoncellist, and
ALICE MANDERBACH
Accompanist
Sun., March 22, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY
Violinist, and
MABEL ROSS RHEAD
Pianist, in Sonata Recital
Sun., March 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
JOSEPH BRINKMAN
Pianist
Sun., April 5, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
THELMA NEWELL
Violonist,.and
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist in Sonata Recital
Sun., April 26, 4:15,; Mendelssohn Theater
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO

a I

I
'.;
. F'
A.
,:x
f
. r

i

t)

centing Style
color.

Details with

These daytime costumes in
sportive mood stress the im-
portance of color contrast ap-
parent in jacket costume at
left which allies tropic sun
with beige and sunkist in
ra...' hmnttele

Wassily Beseki-sky
Violinist
Joseph Brinkman

Hanns Pick
Violincellist

0 ~ l *: - - U

III

III

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan