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March 17, 1931 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-17

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MARCH 17, 1931

1-11. L IV, i C I-I i ""a' "'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Named to Presidency
of Allegheny College
ROBBINS EAFLIIIII i
PROBLEM CREATED
Annual Diffiiculties Presented
by Outstate Students Told
by Secretary.
STUIW BEGAN' IN~ 1863
New Publication Merely Sets
Forth Arguments in
Favor of Policy.
In order to give some sort of
permanency to the arguments pro-
pounded yearly against the aboli-
tion of the non-resident student,
who annually creates a problenr i.r Associated Press Photo
the University executive body to William P. Tolley,
face, Dr. Frank E Robbins, assist- Madison, N. J. man, who has been
ant to the President, has issued a elected president of Allegheny ol-.
booklet in which the major issues lege, Meadville, Pa. Tolley is o'nly
are discussed. The problem, first 30 years old.
considered by the Regents in 1863,
has been given continued and care-
ful study ever since, and Dr. Rob-
bins' publication suhs up the argu-
ments in favor a continuation of X
such policies as have been exercisedTOU EU
in the past.
"No properly qualified Michigan Armada of Airships to Appear,
student is excluded from the Uni- -nFlight
versity because non-resident stu- in ght as Column
dents are. Mmitted," the pamphlet 20 Miles Long.

OIL MAGNATES ASK
GOVERN MENT HELP
Advisory Committeemen Want
Administration Hearing
at March Parley.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 16-(')-
Cicero Murray, chairman of the Oil
States Advisory Committee, in a
telegram to Secretary Ray Lyman
Wilbur, today appealed to the Fed-
eral Oil Conservation Board for a
full hearing of the oil world's prob-
lems around March 30.
Murray, who advised Wilbur that
the Oil States Advisory Committee
would meet in Washington,.March
30, declared that members of the
group wanted the hearing to de-
velop plans for stabilizing the in-
dustry.
Murray told Wilbur 'any sugges-
tion from himself or other members
of the Administration for solving
the troubles of the'petroleum world
would be welcomed by the advisory
eommittee.
He notified Wilbur that a copy of
the resolutions adopted at the Tex-
arkana conference of the oil com-
mittee urging an interstate compact
reducing oil production was en
route to him through the mails.
!lip - - °--- - ,

EPIDEMIC PASSES
CRISIS IN ALASKA
POINTBARROW, Alaska, Mar. 16.
-(A-)-Dr. Henry Griest and his
small staff, who have been work-
ing day and night fighting a diph-
theria epidemic in the farthest
north community on the continent,
believedtoday the crisis had passed.
A week-end investigation, into
every igloo in this vicinity resulted
in the discovery of two new cases,
making a total of 27 which were
serious. Dr. Griest said he found!
about half the native population of
300 was affected more or less. With
60 natives immunized Sunday, anti-j
toxin had been administered to the
entire village, including the dozen
white residents.
Indiana State Books
Contain 181 New Laws
INDIANAPOLIS, Mar. 16.-(.P)-
Indiana had 181 new laws on its
statute books today, the products ofs
the 1931 general assembly. A smalle
part of these already are in forcev
since they contained emergency i
clauses, but the remainder will note
become effective until late in May
when the acts have been printed. a
The safe in Gov. Harry G. Leslie'sa
office became a tomb for 18 other
measures passed in the closing
hours of the assembly, however, for p
that number failed to meet the i
governor's approval. f
C

FREE (TATE PUBLIC
HOUSES VMAY OPEN~
Decision Is Pending on Bill to
Legalize Opening During
St. Patrick's Day.
DUBLIN, Mar. 16.-(P)--The Free
State may drown the Shamrock
Tuesday if the Dail gives an expect-
ed decision some time today on a
bill legalizing open public houses
for a few hours on St. Patrick's
Day.
Otherwise Ulster and North Ire-
land, where liquor restriction laws
are less strict, will be the only sec-
tion of the Emerald Isle which can
carry out the old custom with fer-
vor.
This year St. Patrick's Day prom-
ises to be one of the happiest in
years, despite the economic depres-
sion. The past year has been mark-
ed with less of political turmoil, of
which Ireland has known so much
n recent years, and the spirits of ,
everyone are remarkably high.
There will be military parades
and open air mass in the barracks
and squares all over the Free State,
with special services in all churches. I
There will be an imposing mili.tary
parade and review through Dublin
n the forenoon, the minister of de-
ense taking the salute at College
Green. Airplanes will circle over- d
head and a sprig of shamrock will
>e worn by every soldier. Athletic
events are arranged for the after-
noon.i

New,

S From

Other(

Io2leges i

states. "The proportion of non-
resident to resiaent students; has
been steadily declining during the
last 50 years, and is still declining.
The state would not save money by
excluding non-resident s t u d e n t s
from the University, but on the
contrary would lose money."
Arguments Listed.
Other, arguments are listed among
which are:
(1) Th1e exclusion of non-resident
students would lower the quality of
the education given Michigan stu-
dents at the University and would
injuriously affect the teaching staff.
(2) Non - resident students and
their frien1ds spend many millions
of dollars in Michigan annually,
:nd advertise Michigan when they
ieturn home. /
(3) Many non-resident students
settle in this state and become use-
ful, productive citizens.
(4) Since other state universities1
receive Michigan students, Michi-
gan can hardly refuse to recipro-
cate.
Outsiders Make Gifts.
(5) It should be pointed out that1
the University has received millions
ofi dollars in gifts, in the form of
lands, buildings, equipment, and+
6idowments for special purposes,
from donors in other states. This'
total is more than $7,000,000, the1
booklet states.;
The legislature of 1929 appropri-
ated $200,000 to advertise the ad-i
vantages of the state and therebyI
biing visitors into Michigan. Ex-1
actly the same thing is being done
every year, without cost to the state,<
by the non-resident students in the7
University, the publication states,
and that's as good a reason as any
for allowing outsiders to enjoy the
advanta'ges of Ann Arbor and herl
University.

WASHINGTON, Mar. 16-(A)-An
aerial armada that will appear in
flight as a column 20 miles long is
preening its wings for the annual
air corps field exercises in May.
A skeleton of a fuli war-time air
division, the force will have 672
planes, 740 officers, and 631 enlisted
men, outstripping in size any pro-
visional organization ever assem-]
bled by the Army for its air man-
euvers.
Since the beginning of the year,
under leadership of F. Trubee Davi-
son, Assistant Secretary of War for
aeronautics, who c o n c e i v e d the
large-scale operations, officers have
been drafting plans for far-flung
mimic battles.
The division will form in the
midldle of May at Dayton, O. After
several days of formation and com-
bat practices with flight demon-
strations over Chicago and Detroit,
it will move in a broken mass to
arrive May 21 in New York.
Starting the next night with a
bombing attack on the city near
midnight, operations will be carried
on for two days. The attack will
end on May 23, when the entire
force will fly in combat formation
for the dedication of Floyd Bennett
Field, New York's new municipal
airport.
The battle-line will then be flung
into the New England sector, with a
mass demonstration May 25 over
Boston. A composite group of planes
will break away from the force for
a sally into Maine, as far north as
Bangor.
The division will be re-formed
the next day in up-state New York
to fly in a column down the Hudson
River and past the massed ranks of
West Point cadets.

I

-iii I

STUDENTS PREFER QUIZZES
UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS-Ex-
periments performed on two sec-
tions of the educational psychology
class here showed that students
prefer quizzes at frequent intervals
to the customary mid-semester and
final examinations. The students',
reasons for the preference were!
that the quizzes aided in weekly
preparation and afforded them a
means of knowing their standings
in the class.
HONORARY SOCIETIES GROW
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS -
Honorary fraternities here have in-
creased from one in 1869 to 160 at
the present time.
SAYS CENSORS NOT NEEDED
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY-The
theatres do not need regulation but
social recognition, according to
Prof. Randolph Somerville. He says
that if all theatres were classified
either for art and education or

amusement, no board of censors
would be needed.
INCLUDE MUSIC SCHOOL
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-The
new college of fine arts, seventh
college on the campus, will be or-
ganized to include the school of
music, the departments of archi-
tecture, art, and design, and the
division of landscape architecture,
including the option of city plan-
ning.

McGILL UNIVERSITY-The stu-
dent council here has asked that
students be less hilarious in their
after-game celebrations. After the
McGill-Harvard game citizens of
Montreal suffered material losses,
and one woman was injured.
IT IS HARD TO
EXCELL
. T

REVOLT AGAINST SPIES
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA-
Dental students are in open revolt
here against the enforcement of
the honor system by spies, the
secret grading methods, the prac- Qua
tice of destroying examination
papers, and the management of
the cooperative store, as was ex- Sh
pressed in a student indignation
meeting here. Out of 164 stu- 1109
dents present, the complaints were
adopted by 148.
WAT(

&son r
for
lity & Service
in
oe Repairing
9 South University
-I

REPAIRING
HALLER'S
State Street Jeweleri

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SPECIALS
Best Quality
for just a little less-
The Betsy Ross Shop
13-15 Nickels Arcade
We Deliver Dial 5931

. I

a

1di

J

TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL PRODUCTION
UNIOR GIR LS' PLAY
IT'S YOUR PLAY
And that's not a lot of pub-
licity bunk. It's produced by
FHO ATTENDED YOUR co-eds, it's set on AVOID THE LAST NIGHT RUSH
RFORMANCE ." YOUR campus, its char- BY ATTENDING AN EARLY
4G, CHORUSES, acters are YOUR pet aver- PERFORMANCE.
DY ALL COM- sions as well as YOUR favor-
ites and its songs have the
"CAME THE itchyandytssnhateDON'T MISS THIS UNUSUAL
catchy rhythms that appeal
VN." to YOUR sense of beat. Don't ATTRACTION.
be in the dark; see this spark- .
ling musical comedy. _

"ASK THOSE W
THE FIRST PE

SONGS5,

DANCIr

DRAMA, COME
BINED INTO

DAV

'9

III

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