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March 12, 1931 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-12

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THE: M I C H I G AN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 12,- 1931

__I

Published every morning except Monday
during the University Year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all newsdis-
pace redited to it or not otherwise credited
in thispaper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan assecond class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
waate; General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 2r124.
,EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
FRaa E. COOPEx, City Editwr
News Editor ........... Gurney Williams
Editorial Director ..........alter XW. Wilds
Sports-Editor............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor ......... Mary L. Behyrnier
Music, Drama, Books.......Wm. J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor....... Harold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor...... Charles R. Sprowi
Telegraph. Editor...........George A. Stauter
CopyGEditor HE................WDI.T.Pype
NIGHT EDITORS.

reason for the abolition of an insti-
tution which has proven its worth'
time' after time, year after year.
Perhaps if the sceptic would ask a
man whose hell week was fair, de-
cent, and moderately hard just
exactly what he thought of the
institution, such editorials as the
"Daily Iowan's" wouldn't have to
be printed. It is only when frater-
nities forget that they are, primar-
ily, groups of gentlemen, whether
theoretically or not, that there is
any doubt of the worth of hell
.week.
Our five erstwhile room and
boarding clubs now eating at the
Union and the League have a
splendid opportunity really to make
a name for themselves. Why not
an amalgamation-the Union Lea-
gue club?
Undergraduate opposition to the
erection of a million-dollar chapel
is reported at Harvard university.
Yes, Harvard is the Michigan of
the East.

S. Beach Conger
Carl S. Forsythe
David M. Nichol

JhnAD. Reindel
Charles R. Sprowl
Richard L. Tobin
Harold 0. Warrem

,SPORTS ASSISTANTS
Sheldon C. Fullerton A I.Cullen Kenneth
Charles A. Sanford
REPORTERS

Thomas M. Cooley
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
Frank B. Gibretl
Lack Goldsmith
oland Goodman
Morton Helper
James Johnson
Bryan Jones
Denton C. Kunie
Eileen Blunt
Nanette Dembitz
Elsie Feldman
Ruth Gallmeyer
Emily G. Grimes
en Lev
Srotn Mageer
Susan Manchester

Powers Moulton
Wilbur J. Meyers
Brainard W. Nies
Robert L. Pierce
Richard Racine
Jerry E. Rosenthal
Karl Seiffert
Geor e A. Stauter
TohnV. Thomas
Sohn S. Townsend
Mary McCall
Cile Miller
Margaret O'Brien
Eleanor Rairdon
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2121.4
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY, Business Meuagef.
KAsPRX I. HALVERSON, Assistant Mansager
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
Advertisirg... .... ..Charles T. 'Kline
Advertising............Thomas M. Davis
Advertising............William W. Warboys
Service.........Norris J. Johnson
Publication...........Robert W. Williamson
Circulation.............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts....... ...homas S. Muir
Business Secretary............Mary J. Kenan
Assistants

Marry R. Beglev
Vernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davis
Richard H. Hiller
Miles Hoisington
Ann W. Verner
Marian Atran
Helen Bailey
Josephine Convid e
Maxine Fishgrund
Dorothy LeMire
Dorothy Laylin

Erle Kightlinger
Don W. Lyon
William Morgan
Richard Strat:melee
Keith TIter
Byrou C. Veddat
Sylvia Miller
Helen Olsen
Mildred Postal
j Marjorie Rough
Mary E. Watt
Johanna Wiese .

Editorial Comment
FRATERNITY FRESHMEN-
From The "DAILY NEBRASKAN"
Fraternity freshmen are an un-
usual lot. They are so downtrodden.
When one pauses to reflect, it seems
almost a tragedy. Why, until the
'Interfraternity council fixed things
up, they were denied initiation into
their respective lodges if they had
flunked any subject.
It was too bad. How can anyone
expect a freshman to pass all his
scholastic hours? It's ridiculous.
The theory of the thing seemed to
be that every freshman had to take
a flock of required subjects, whether
he wanted to take them or not.
Then, Oh unreasonable world! he
had to get a passing grade in every
subject to be eligible for initiation.
Now everything is rosy again. A
freshman can flunk a course if he
wants to, provided he gets good
enough grades in his other work
to make his total average for the
semester seventy-two or better. We
are all for it. Let them flunk all
their hours. Who cares? They might
make better fraternity men, ac-
cording to the standards evidently
prevalent at Nebraska.
Asa matter of fact, there seems
to be no reason to believe that any
freshman -who cannot successfully
carry his fourteen hours or so, the
first semester, can ever carry suffi-
- cient hours to be graduated. After
all, requirements are requirements
bless 'em! And if a freshman must
register for them, he must register
for them, he must pass them
whether he wants to do so or not
If he cannot do so, he will never
get anywhere in this university
And, accordingly, why initiate him?
Of course, a flunk is recorded as
forty-five per cent. And it would
in most cases, result in a grad
lower than the requisite seventy-
two. But that is something else
again. Why permit initiation o:
men who cannot pass freshman
courses, especially, required fresh
men courses?
JUSTICE HOLMES
I From The NEW YORK HERALD
TRIBUNE.
To him whose ninetieth birthday
gives us the welcome opportunity
we express again our reverent ad
miration and affection.
Every birthday of Oliver Wendel
Holmes must be for the people o
this nation an occasion of prid
and gratitude.

THURSDAY, MARCH 12, 1931
Night Editor-BEACH CONGER, Jr.
EXIT HELL WEEK?
"This year will not see the com-
plete abolition of hell week on the
Iowa campus," the "Daily Iowan"
tells us in a recent editorial, "but
the day of the paddle together with!
a great amount of horseplay is
rapidly passing. A new type of pro-
bation is at hand. It involves a
program of constructive work for
the pledges rather than a period
in which no good is accomplished
and only harmful methods em-
ployed."
This, and; other recent editorials,
point to a resumption of the age-
old argument over the question:
"Shall we or shall we not have hell
week?" And this very ancient prob-
len is answered effectively every
year by an overwhelming majority
of those who know the benefits to
be derived from pledge probation
periods, benefits which cannot pos-
sibly be obtained through any other
means. It is true that there are
certain fraternities, certain classes
of active members whose regard for
4-1- .-P 4-. Lnn21, -n4 V nr lit of

IT'S
THURSDAY
AGAIN!
It doesn't seem to matter what
the weather, how bad the times,
or whether Rudy Valee-'Our Rudy'
-is going to bleat a few of old
Michigan's songs into the country's
ill graces, still Thursday keeps re-
morselessly rolling around at its
allotted time, rarely if ever being
even so much as a day late, and
visiting all it's trials and tribula-
tions upon our innocent heads.
* * *
And now that Thursday is dis-
posed of, let us turn our attention
to the ad that appears on yester-
day's back page:
"Make your shut in friends
happy with a cheerful potted
plant."
All day long suggestions have
been pouring in as to how thi
might have been worded. This de-
partment has only one reply to al
these proposals. The advertisemen
says "Make your shut in friend
happy with a cheerful potted plant'
and that's all there is to it. If th
management had wanted it wordec
otherwise they would have said so
CONTRIBUTION
Dear Dan:
Have you noticed that the
University of Rochester has
abolished all 8 o'clocks for the
reason that they consider that
the students might better sleep
in their own rooms than those
furnished by the University
and filled with uncomfortable
benches. This is an idea.
Sincerely,
J. T. Scronk.
Dear J. T.:
You're right. It is an idea-bu
not such a darn good one if yo
ask me.-Oh all right, don't ther
but that's what I think anywa3
The fallacy is that they entirel
overlooked the fact that everyon
of any social standing whateve
always sleeps through his first clas
t(which may or may not be at,
o'clock) at home and comeseto hi
second one to sleep in the class
room. What they need, then, i
obviously some rule which wi
abolish everyone's second class re
gardless of what time it may com
and the benches will be free c
Ssleepersand everybody else.
r If they find that this cuts in
on the day's work too much
they might move the first and
second classes up to 6 o'clock or
, thereabouts. Or they might just
give up the idea of having a
University there at all. If such
a movement as this last should
spread I am sure it would prove
s very popular with people in
, general. Think of the rest it
e would afford for liquor raiders!
- Yrs . . . . . .Dan.
f We take great pleasure in ushe
ing into the limelight a new indu
- try. The prospectus we got labe
it simply as a "Trouble Shop." Th
sounds like a very fine enterpri
indeed. If you are tired of your o]
troubles just drop around and s
- them. A tentative price list is give
below so that you may see the po:
y sibilities of the new business in o
y amongst, so to speak.
(1) Nail in shoe, 5c.
(2) Postcard from the Dean's

l office, $65.
f (3) Heartening information
e about number of cockroaches
in local eat shop kitchens for
s the fastidious, $15.
(4) Wart on neck, 50c.
e (5) Professor on neck,
, $2,750.36
s* .*
I see that, despite my scath-
f ing coments of the other day
p that JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY is
h still determined to appear.
They even threaten to'show the
- faculty and B. M. O. C.s and
e the Faculty as they really are.
a Granting that they could pos-
sibly know enough to do so, I
r still regard this as being dis-
d tinctly worth not seeing. The
)f J. M. O. C.s and the Faculty
y look bad enough as they ap-
s pear to the ordinary casual
f observer, and I for one have
- not the morbid curiosity to go
and see how badly a lot of girls
- in pants that don't fit can imi-
h tate them.
t In pleasing contrast to the usu
g 'Gigantic Sale' signs that threate
e us on every hand these days com
the refreshing conservatism of tl
r following as it appears in a loci
d bookstore window .....
e "MICROSCOPE SALE"
t *

-USIC AND DRAM
SCHOOL OF MUSIC CONCERTS
TONIGHT: George Poinar, violin-
ist, student of Professor Wassily
Besekersky of the School of Music
will present a program in the
School of Music auditorium tonight

Always

i
k t
ki
,1

beginnign at 8:15.
Mr. Poinar was sent on a scholar-
ship from his native city to the
National High School Orchestra
Camp at Interlochen where he won
immediate recognition and was
unanimous choice of students and
faculty to be concert master of the
orchestra. The following year Mr.
Poinar enrolled in the local School
of Music from which he has ap-
peared several times, notably in a
recital last year which included a
splendid performance of the Men-
delssohn Concerto. The intresting
program which Mr. Poinar will
present tonight follows:c
Concerto in G Minor Bruch
Sonata in G Minor, for violin
alone Bach -
Romance Svendsen
Rondo Schubert
Lotus Land Cyril Scott
,Polonaise No. 2 Wieniawski
The recital is open to the general
public and no admission fee is
charged.
SUNDAY: For the second per-
formance of the University Sym-
phony Orchestra under the direc-
tion of Professor Mattern, Brahms
Symphony No. 1 in C Minor has
been selected as the major offering.
The choice of so complex a sym-
phonic work making such severe
demands on an orchestra suggests
the degree to which the orchestra is
developing.
The program opens with the ar-
rangement by Abert of the organ
fugue in G Minor. He has scored
it for modern orchestra and pre-
ceded it with one of the old German
chorales sung by the trombone
choir. Following the Brahms sym-
thony, the brilliant Concert Valse
in D Major by Glazounow will be
presented.
The program begins at 4:15 Sun-
day afternoon in Hill auditorium
and will be given complimentary
to the public.
RECENT RECORDS
CHOPIN: Fantasia in F Minor,
op. 49: played by Marguerite
Long: on Columbia Records 17018
17019.
The days of what Ezra Pound
called the "young conservatory-girl
Chopin" seem about over. DePach-
mann, the grandest young girl of
them all, is quite dead, I take it
(he is, isn't he?). And certainly,
the better pianists today refuse to
play Chopin in a series of lovely
whimpers. They approach him
rather as a musician than as a bad
poet. The refinement has done
Chopin good. For the most part his
music can bear it. And, as a result,
his immortality is being established
on firmer terms than when it lay
with drawing-room-perfumed-mel-
ancholy readers.
To prove that not only the men
(Rachmaninoff, Horowitz, Back-
haus, etc.), are doing this, here is
. Marguerite Long playing the F
Minor Fantasie (as she also plays
the F Minor Concerto for Colum-
bia)with restraint in her tone
quality, a minimum of color, a
minimum of rubato, fine stability
in her rhythms, and a general feel-
ing that Chopin was a self-respect-
ingkartist, not a self-indulgent
weakling. This particular composi-
tion ("the grandest of them all"
said Huneker with typical purple-
ness) can bear the treatment. It is
free of delirium, it has serenity and
occasional nobility, and above all
an admirable formal compactness.
The recording has that splendid
reproduction of piano tone which

has echaraterized all Columbias
issues recently.
BRAHMS: Symphony No. 4 in E
Minor: played by Max Fiedler and
the Berlin State Opera Orches-
tra: on Brunswick Records No.
90114-90119.J
Only a few words, and this al-
bum-a Brunswick reprint of a
Polydor issue-recommends itself.
First, it is the only respectable re-
cording of a great symphony (since
1 one can afford to ignore the Victor
album, a poor conductor, Hermann
I Abendroth, with a poor orchestra,
Z the old London Symphony, in pre-
s electrical days).
Second, Max Fiedler, an old Bos-
ton Symphony conductor, gives the
symphony a splendid reading, lucid
and noble at all moments. Third,
one needs the hours of study, which

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aster
Take a Greyhound Bus
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day fun.
PACK UP all your bags
and go hone for Easter
by Greyhound baus. You'll
arrive safelyand on time,
with extra dollars In your
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this modern, deluxe way
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year when making your
houeward trek for Eas-
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For tickets and
information see
Campus Agent
CAMPUS
TRAVEL
BUREAU
536 Thompson St.
Phone 22266
Eastern Michigan Motor Bus
Depot
200 So. 4th St. Phone 3589
GREtUND

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clothing

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but just

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11

the safety, health, and mora iy o He is one of us and few people,
a pledge class ceases to be sane can say that of such a man.
when hell week comes around. It Holmes-with his great, wis'
is also true that there are some spirit, his alert and learned mind

houses where the percentage ofr
gentlemen is very low; it is from
these houses that such conclusions
as the "Daily Iowan's" spring.
Either a man is an independent
without a thorough knowledge of
the reality of hell week, or else he
As influenced by this ungentlemanly
minority when he derides the
necessary, vital scheme upon which
such fraternity functions are based.
Probation week helps a frater-
nity decide whether or not a man
has the stuff in him to make a
good active member. It also gives
the pledge a chance to see what he
is getting into; it makes him ,use
every ounce of self-control he is
able to produce during the trying
hours of tribulation and insult.
Only in such cases as the active
forgets that he is supposed to be'
a gentleman, only when the paddle
is used inhumanly-cases so rare
that they are far more the excep-
tion than the rule-only when the
pledge must wear permanently the
mental and physical scars of his
hell week treatment must hell week

his unquenchable fire of youth, hi
tireless energy, his wit, his simpli
city, his broad vision, his sense o
reality, his instinct for leadershil
-are there many to compare witl
him?
He once said, "We live by sym
bols." To us Justice Holmes, whos
own life has covered so great
part of the life of the United States
is a symbol of our ideal nation. Fo
the highest patriotism we comment
to the youth of the land a study o
the volume of his decisions recentl
published by the Vanguard Pres
and the commemorative volume o
tributes issued today by Coward
McCann.
No one has expressed more beau
tifully than he the thing at whic]
we are aiming in this government.
"When men have realized tha
time has upset many fightinE
faiths," he said, "they may com
to believe even more than they be
lieve the very foundations of thei
own conduct that the ultimate goo
desire is better reached by fre
trade in ideas .. . that the best tes

is

A comparatively large

selec-

tion of fine overcoats in plain
blue and oxford grey at prices
much below those of next win-
ter. You can use a new coat
during March and still be
money ahead. Coats originally
priced to fifty-five dollars.
~2 95O"

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