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March 10, 1931 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-10

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LY -I

CH 10, 1931

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE FXV)

... . ........

PAGE 1~'IV~

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I

PROFESSOR'S WIFE HOSTESS CHAIRMAN

i 1

WIIMEN STUDENTS
ID THEATR GROUP
IN PROGRA PLAN

Board of Representatives Will
Assist in Presenting
Chinquilla.
NEW POLICY CONTINUED
Committee of Twelve Makes up
Group in Charge of Details
for Presentation.
Continuing the recently adopted
policy of having programs of en-
tertainment sponsored by various
campus organizations, the Board of
Representatives of the Women's
League will assist the T h e a t r e
Group in presenting Chinquilla,
American Indian Princess, at 3:20
o'clock Thursday in the' Lydia Men-
delssohn theatre.
Committee in Charge.
Early in the winter, the Board of-
,fered its cooperation to the Theatre
Group in its various undertakings.
but this isthe first time the Group
has availed itself of the proffered
assistance.
A volunteer group from the Board
is working on the details of the
preparation. Anne Davenport, '31,
who as president of Mosher hall is
a member of both the Theatre
group and thetBoard, is in charge
of arrangements.
A committee of twelve is assisting
Miss Davenport. The members are
as follows: Marjorie Schoultz, '33,
Irene Thomas, '33, Lucille Oldham,
'32, Edna Brown, Spec.D., Helen
Houghtaling, '32Ed., Mary Ley, Hel-
en Greenwald, '34, Gladys Davis,'31,
Barbara .Stratton, '31, Margaret
Mix, '31, and Esther Kucks, '31.
To Give Indian Sketches.
In bringing.-hinquilla here, the
groups are introducing a new form
of entertainment to the campus.
The princess will present a series
of short dramatic sketches dealing
With Indian life, history, and folk
lore. She is a direct lineal descend-
ant of°a long°ine of Indian chief-
tains, and is a 'princess in her own
right.
4The Theatre group plans to spon-
sor other programs throughout the
remainder of the current season. 5
indoor Golf Practice
to be Offered Mondays
Opportunity for indoor golf prac-
tice in the Women's Athletic build-
ing will be offered every Monday
afternoon from 4 o'clock until 6
o'clock during the early part of the
season, Miss Ethel McCormick, as-
sistant dean of women, announced
yesterday afternoon.
Anyone who is interested, wheth-
er able to play golf or not, is asked
to come to these practices or to see

WOMAN WILL SING
NORWEGIAN SONGS
Program for International Night
Includes Mrs. C. Koella.
By D. M., '32.
Walking into the apartment of
Hjordis GreggKoella was like en-
tering a sunny cottage in Norway.
Norwegian paintings and tapestries,
pieces of silver that are reproduced
from articles used on Viking ships,
and various pieces of Norwegian
heirloom furniture provide a set-
ting that is refreshingly un-Amer-
ican.
Mrs. Koella, the wife of Prof.
Charles Koella of the French de-
partment, completes the picture
with her Titian coloring and old-
.vorld hospitality.
As she showed me the brilliantly
embroidered 'costume she is plan-
ning to wear in the International
Night program tonight, in which.
she will sing Norwegian songs, she
gave me brief pictures of her life in
Norway and on the Continent.
"My first voice teacher was the'
Baroness Munthe de Morgenstierne,
Df Norway," she said, obligingly
3pelling out the name for me. "Her
husband was a pupil of Chopin,
and when visiting her often sat on
the sofa which had belonged to
Chopin.
"Later I went to Paris and stud-
ied a year with Guido Spinetti,"
and she showed me the picture of
a man who looked vaguely like
Basil Rathbone. "In Copenhagen I
worked with Vilhem Herold, direc-
tor of the Opera School of the
Royal Theatre there."
Mrs. Koella has sung for the
royal family of Norway, and for
President Poincaire and Mrs. Poin-
caire in France. The latter she de-
scribes as "very pretty but short-
I was so disappointed."
When she talks about Norway,
her face expresses the enthusiasm
and interest she feels for her home.
"There are only -a little over two
million, five hundred thousand peo-
ple in Norway," she remarked, "andi
yet it is famous for the many great I
men who have lived there, such
as Ibsen, Bjornson, and Hamsun."

PROF ESSOR'S W I FE (0 0
TO SING TONIGHTLD
9 TO HOLD MEETING

FRESHMAN PAGEANT OFFERS VARIED
FIELD OF ACTIVITIES FOR WOMEN

Hjordis Gregg Koella,
Wife of Professor Charles Koella
who will participate in the annual
International night program which
is being given tonight in Hill au-
ditorium.
J-Hoppers Win Close
Contest From Cagers
In one of the most closely con-
tested games of the season, the J-
Hoppers won from the Cagers with
a score of 28-29. Poor passing by
both teams marked the game wnicn
was really a contest between the
Cager guards and the opposing
forwards.
Winning this game puts the J-
Hoppers in the first place in the
tournament up to date, The game
this afternoon will be between the
Basketeers and the Lemmons.
Anyone desiring a ticket for the
basket-ball banquet on Thursday
night must get in touch with Fran-
ces Manchester, '34, by calling
23454 before 8 o'clock tonight.

Thirty-four Women, Who Will
Usher at Play, Make up
Committee.
Members of the Hostess commit-
tee for the Junior Girls' Play will
meet at 3:30 o'clock at the League
building. Elizabeth Louden, chair-
man of the committee, says that
any one who cannot come must
call her before the meeting if she
wishes to remain on the committee.
The Hostess committee is com-
posed of 34 women who will usher
at the performances of "Came the
Dawn," and act as hostesses in the
lobby between acts. The women will
be divided into groups which will
work only a certain number of
nights each.
The following women are asked
to report at the meeting today:
Ethel Arscott, Mona Mary Barns,
Rosalind Caley, Elizabeth Carpen-
ter, Leonore Qaro, Dorothy Coll,
Dorothy Elsworth, Agnes Graham,
Mary Harriman, Lois Heitman, Har-
riet Hicks, Lucille Hoffman, Esther
Kirby, Virginia Ladd, Susan Man-
chester.
Margaret McDonald, Elizabeth
McDowell, Lois McQuire, Doris Mil-
lar, Marjorie Millar, Almcorine
Montgomery, Helen Musselwhite,
Maxine Nowak, Cathelia Pollock,
Elva Pascoe, Virginia Robertson,
Mary Schaeffer, Celine Smith, Carol
Soverhill, Martha Swihart, Doro-
thea Waterman, Erie Weber,bHazel
Woodley, and Genevieve Zeb.
WOMEN NOW ENGINEERS
Twelve women have registered in
the College of Engineering at the
University of Chicago. One of them
is the first woman to enter the
department of civil engineering in
the history of the University.

First Given in Conjunction With
Traditional Lantern Night
Procession in 1924.
While the annual Lantern night

is a tradition wnieh has existed for Education department.
many years on the Michigan cam- In 1920, the main event of Lan-
pus, the Freshman pageant is a tern night was the Maypole dance
comparatively recent innovation. ,presented by the freshman and
The first pageant produced entire- sophomore women, and in 1923, a
ly by freshman women was given in pageant including women of all
the spring of 1924, when a presen- classes took place on Ferry Field.
tatign of the story of Persephone Offers Many Activities.
and Pluto was depicted. At the present time, the pageant
Present Masque in 1916. is given in conjunction with Lan-
The first affair arranged by the tern night, and is entirely the work
women alone appeared in 1920. In of the freshman women. It includes
former years, the custom of having a great variety of activities, and
both men and women in the'talent of all kinds is necessary. ti
masques was followed more or less general chairman and a central
consistently. The feature of the committee are in charge of arrange-
Shakespeare centenary in 1916 was ments, and members of the class
the production of "The Queen's take part in the dances, design cos-
Progress" in Hill auditorium. The tumes, select music, and serve in
book was written by Prof. M. P. various other capacities.
Elections for the central general
chairman and members of the cen-
W..A.Members Will tral committee will be held at 4
Order Sport Jackets o'clock Wednesday afternoon in the
h Lydia Mendelssohn theatre.
Members of the Women's Athletie

Tilley of the English department,
while the score was prepared by
Prof. Earl V. Moore of the School
of Music, and the dances devised
by Miss Alice Evans of the Physical

A. A.U.W TO HA
DR. HOIAIARDJONES5
'Interpretations of American
Literature' to be Subject
of Speaker.
At the regular monthly meeting
to be held Saturday in the Ethel
Fountain Hussey room of the
League, the American Association
of University Women will have Dr.
Howard Mumford Jones as the
main speaker on the program. His
subject will be "Interpretations of
American Literature."
Dr. Jones is the head of the Eng-
lish department of the University
and is the director of the Nell
Gwynn theatre company. He got
his A. B. degree at the University
of Wisconsin and his Ph. D. degree
at the University of Chicago. After
teaching for six years at the Uni-
versity of Texas and for six at
Duke university he came to Mich-
igan. His publications have been
"American and French Cultures,"
"Shadow-King," "Romanesque Ly-
rics," and short magazine articles.

Association will have one more
chance this year to obtain W. A. A.
Jackets from 9 to 11 o'clock tomor-
row morning and from 2 to 4
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in the
W. A., A. office on the main floor
of the League building. Jean Bent-
ley, '33, will be in the office during
these hours to take orders.
The jackets are of a dark blue
woolen material, and are very prac-
tical for outdoor sports wear.
WOMAN WINS CONTEST
First place in the Scarab design
contest went to a woman of Wash-
ington university for the first time.
The silver medal was offered by
the men's national honorary archi-
tectural society.

FOUNTAIN AND LUNCH SERVICE
WE DELIVER
From 10 a. m. to 11 p. m.
Dial'7 850
Drugs and Toilet Requisites
Ann Street Drug Col.
1117 East Ann Street
1 '/2 Blocks West of University Hospital

Ih

I TRAMVURAL
Ey T E _R C. L A S S,
.iN E WS
The fencing class will meet at
7:30 o'clock tonight in Barbour
gymnasium. The group will meet at
the same time on Thursday.
Interclass Basketball Game
Schedule.
Tuesday at 4 o'clock, Basketeers
vs. Lemons.
Wednesday at 4 o'clock,,Cardinals
vs. Onions; Cagers vs. Bluejays.
The following houses will com-
pete in the preliminary swimming
meet at 7:15 o'clock tonight in the
Union pool; Alpha Xi Delta, Pi Beta
Phi, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Betsy
Barbour, and Alumnae House.

GAENUINE
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Those who come are requested to open-hour dancing class which
bring their own clubs and practice meets at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow
balls. night in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.

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