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March 08, 1931 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I'

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SUNDAY, MAI

_ _ _ _,. M

at9 ba

KHILUNER BINiQIED
ORIGINAL PROG g rrRAeM ru

RKUSSIAN BALALAIKA ORCH-ESTRA FROM DETROIT,
TO PRESENT PROGRAM OF FOLK SONGS, DANCEZS

TICKETS FOR
HAELARGE

'',

I

,X 7 -in
Laundr'
y

and

n-g

&..1

k.00iompany

beg

to solicit your traeonDry

which

is done in the I'lost

q

rni and best equipped plant

in

/P
Cash dnd Cat'ry
1f~ ARE MAINTAINED AT

yr ~unviuruui u,
fnitcniational Night' in 1915
Appeared under Title of
AllNations' Revue'.
N tme of Event Ch anged Each
Year Until Adoption of
Final Tarn; in 1923.
Sr&e1915, when the forerunner
of' lmt rnational Night first appear=
cdc und~er the title of "The All-'_Na-
Jons' Revue," this annual event
has undergone a series of changesI
and has finally evolved into its
present form.
Zhe original program, was given
under the direction of Prof. J. A. C.
HIildner, of the Germn d~lepart-
nletbetter k~nown to the students
on the ,camp~us and i~n te "Revue"
as " . More than Qoe studen~ts
participated in this event and no
xenewas foregone in an att empt
to make, this one of the gr'eatest
events of its type ever to be staged
at MichiganPrfessor Hildner said.
'Yt"e Chaged
Each year, this programg ,has ap-
the> title "Interati4naiviht" wasI
adopted in 1923~. Since th at time,
there has been a, presentation each
year uil. 4the presentoqne.,
F'ollowing the "All Nations' -Re-
vv~Q,"ther appeared in 1916, "The
Magic Capet," writtenl an~d direct-
ed y ro. Raleigh NesoQf the
dertw~eet of engineering English.
From the f rt itV has been t~he p~ol-
icyofth Csmpolitani club under
whoqse direction each of these pre-
sentations has been, giv to bring
to Ann Arbor, to supplement the
talet of the Studen2t groups, with
some profesioalats
Brng Ouitsie Acts.
This year, in accordance with this
policy of long standing, the Cosmo-
politan cluis brigintg to thle city.
the distigished Russian B~alalaika
orchestra~ from the Russian ce-nter
in Detroit, two Mexican girls from
the Chalpultapec club, and a group
of six Roumanian girls who will
present some of their native folk
dances and songs.
From the first, the. purpose of
these annual productions has been
to bring together the manry foreign
students enrolled in the University,
n~ow numbering more than 265, in
such a way as to weld them into an
important factor of campus life.

Tickets sales for the eigth ani-
nual International Night progra~m
to be given at 8;15o'clock Tuesday
Snight in Hill auditorium, have been
unusually heavy, it was reported by
..>Malda Kuo, Grad., ticket chairmani
fcr the event.
Distribution of tickets has also
+ been carried out among the school
children of the cityi and the pro-
gram has received the backing of
the luncheon clubs and men's or-
ganizations of the city, including
From tc Lrssikaz center in Deftroit , the Balalaika orchestra comes to Ann Arbor to present a pro- the Rotary and Kiwanis clubs.
grain of folk, songs and danrces in the -eighth aninual International Night,-Tuesday in Hill auditorium. They' "Sales in the schools," William
have beco.-no widely known in the city for their various performances and take their name from the'pecu- Compton, x'31,, who has been in
lairly sha~pe d stringed instruments that they play. Their program for Tuesday, includes slich numbers as charge of this phase of the distri-
"Songs of thie Volga," a medley .of folk songs among which are "Down the Mother Volga," and "Stenka 1 bution, reported, ','ae, ben much
f zthx la l iad4 sf a eer dryossack here. They will conclude their program with "Ey Uchnemn," the I heavier than 'was expected.,"
f~a~uc s "So-- of I? alg Botii-en. Tickets for the performance may
_ ___ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ be obtained at either of the book-
stores or from any memiber~ of the
C S O O ITAN CLEI A S FOUNDED Cosmopolitan 'club. They are also
ff~ __ onsale__atL
- i1' ~~~~~ ~ ~~~~ADATS hslea ane hall and may be PTUNTFOEGUD RD TESpoueathebxficofHl
auditorium during the day and
__T Society Promotes Understonding Poland, Porto Rico, Russia, Switzer- night of the program. They will
ofO~- onreland, Syria, and Tur~key. also )be sold at desks in Angell hall
- __fOeontis Indirectly, this group has. played ,andl in the main library tmorrow
*- ,Friendslzip. a great part in the building up of and Tuesday.
Professors Have B~een iriAectors- an international good will. As a -- - -._
I of At air~s.several Times; With the~ aim of providing some rule, the students who come to V , f
sort of social center for the foreign Michigan, one of the largest for- wA!e Va~ev1
Presidents Aied. students on the campus and with eign student schools in the coun- h t ~ tn e
Vacit spp~~rth Inera-the idea of piresenting some medi- try, are from the influential classes. 0Yotu e
Faclstyc33pprtforth Itera-umthrough which these people Many of theme, when they return to ICWAt
tional Night program~s has been from. other nations could learn to their native homes, become leaders (prctcalyD>&Rtr
p ractically' unlimited since the in-' know each other and the life in i in the political and. ind~ustrial. life -
~epior oftheann~alevet i ~.other countries, -the Cosmopolitan of the nations. Their international I Fr the chic andt smartpehs
Eachyea thre as ean soeclub was founded some years ago and broadened outlook, gained d~ifl- M~~y may go to Paris but for the
by ai group of faculty mem-fbers whol ing their student days on the cam-- aint anpd colorfu~l she must go to
mebroftefcut'~i~tn saw 'the need for such an eirganiza--I pus and as members of the clubthou-fhewypasofhe
th en er f ormo teance., and severalr oftthe tion, , become factors of increasing' im'- he-otf-hwyplcsfth

Unusual Volume of Reservations
Reached; Clubs Assist
Cosmopolitans.

A

4
X'

Maynard St.

Pione 21816

1Openl Until 8:00 P. M..

St.

Phone 2 1 28

Y pslanti, , 11 North Wahington
Phone 1567

St.

presidents of the University hay-
in'g approved, highly of the project.
The lateP r e sid e nt-emeritus
Harry D. Hutchins, as well as for-
mer president Marion Leoy Bur-
ton, considered International Night
a real factor in bring'ing the for-.
eign stud1ents together,
In comnmenting on the 1928 per-
formance, Dr. Clarence Cook Little,
who preceded President Alexander
G. Ruthven as head of the Univer-
sity administration, said enthusias-
tically that 'the programs afford
'annually an opportunity for the
University community to see those
of its members who came from far-
off countries wearing their native
costumes and furnishing entertain-
ment imported from dozens of for-
eign lands."

Since that tiine, the club has en-
Toyed a constant growth until it
-has attained a position of promni-
nence among the organ~zations on
the campus. At the present, its
membership includes all the forcign
students. on the c~zniputs, a total

i

of more 'than 265 persons from 40
different nations.
The largest single group in the
club is that of the Chinese which
comprises U08 students. The Hindus!
and the Filipinos have each 25
members in their groups, while . the
Japanese come nex~t with 17. Some
of the other countries which are
represented in the club are Albania,
Argentina, Armenia, Austria, Boli-
via, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canal Zone,
C o11o m bi a, Czechioslovak ia , Den-
mark, England, F~rance, Greece,
Guatemala, Holland, lHungary, Iraq,
Italy, Java, K~orea, Mexico, Norway,
Palestine, Panama. Persia, Peru,

portance.
During the next year, the, club
will make an additional, drive for
American xmembership, Jack Yuen,
'31, president of- the organization,
stated.
Cosmopolitans' R vu.
Gets Unique P~ublficity
Unique advertising in the form of
highly colored posters from th~eC
dliff erent countries at which the
S. S. Cosmos will stop on its tour~
of the world, Tuesda~y night, were
obtained by Ruth Ann Oakes, di-'
rector of the eighth anrnual Itr
,national Night, for the publicity
campaign.
These posters have ben distrib~ut-
ed around the campus with photo-
graphs of some of the principals in
the large cast.

wor'ld, In this regard the annual
International Night, sponsored by
the Cosmnopltan club, is something
of a ; tle show.
9 pportunity is afforded for one
hal~f of the world to see how the
other half dresses. The Roumanian
grs, dancing in the production,
wilb dressed in the typical cross-
stiteched blouses of the peasant
clas.Over these ,are worn gorgeous
The Mexcan actors will contrib-
ufre something of color with their
spnls and gay raiment, while the
Rusa B alalaika orchestra, the
feature number on the program,
will be robed in blouses of' yellow
an bhlu~eyeni-colored trousers and
black boi~ots. Over this, they wear
redingetes of mulberry velvet.
*l iaese, Filipino, Norwegian and,
Jaaese costumes will also be dis-
played by the respective groups.

U"; shkow you

what real. Cleaning and

Pressing is.

-I

..

S
,q Mews of the Neti
:y
Q,4-o% A zn

W

. kitv

'h J, ew fasrlion season has arrived-binging sparkling new modes aind
I iygiter hues in k~eeping with- Springtime loveliness. Every section displays
tenew thing's in wonderful variety.

The New Suits

Priced $29.75-$39.75
At O 'lvry 1heinnaing of a1 new fashion season, with so many things to
be bougti is most worth while to find such delightful selection in suits
sc~ highly f orda! this moderate pricing.

The NewCoats

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of real enjoyment.
your own campus.

Come and see WHO'S WHO

on

w

IN= -dim=

1

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P777 - - -

There is somethingf distinctively different about this
year's JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY that you don't want

I

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to miss.

Something that will give you two full hours

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For your co'nventence

Ann Arbor ,Store.

EAVANT

evgr

.1

.

forward

burr, Patterson & Autld Co.
Ma nuracturing Fraternity Jewelers
Detroit, Michigan &W~alk rviIe, Ontario

603, Church

St.

$19.75=-$59.75
'Charfi:g in their style newness, fascin~ating inl their smartness are these
newi coats of the new 'season. The fabrics-the colorings--.and distinctive.
1 0V ttouies of Fashioni mark them as leading mzodes of the Spring and
Sutinver season.
/The New Dresses,
S$I .00O--$49.75
"BF GAY" say the new Spring dresses.- Wear
- olorful' prints. . . wear two colors in the
s.2ime dress... wear a jaunty bolero
jacket wear frilly lingerie
touiches 't-d phow canl you help
%.being gay . and young
looking? {
&.Ji

Ticket Sale Starts Tom orroi

(

F RAN K

0AKE

Mg

-- ,

HOSEl

PRICES

FIRST EIGHT ROWS.-
(Blocks of .15 or more
REMAINING FIRST FLOOR.

~2.oo)

* 4 .2.50
* . .$2.0

Sheer, lustrous chif.
for to strong service
--we ar~e ready to
serve your every need
in hosiery at a wide

A)

Th
spx
toil
glI
eye

GLOVES
'enew gloves for
)ring are here-the
mg, maniy - button
loves will take your
ie, and you're right,
iey're the smartest
ling for spring.
$1.95 to
$7.95

BALCONY..M

.$1.50
. $1.00

LAST THREE ROWS .

range in prices.th
$2.75 _ _ _ _ _ _
The Clothes You Wear At
Expression of You-

i_ -,I

-ua

1 r~ri;'

.re An

iv~Ii~ MF FT ~1 ThD2trP

-and that alone is a good reason that you should see the newer
notes in sport, street andi dress apparel that we are showing.

b

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