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March 01, 1930 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'TIHE M IC-I-IGAN DAILY

Published every morning except Monday'
during the TUniversity year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The' Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.5So.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May'
nard Street,
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21224.
EDITORIAL STAFF
MATelephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman........George C. Tilley
City Editor...... .......Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor..........Donald J. Kline
Sports Editor.......Edward L. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor........,...Marjorie Follmer
Telegraph Editor ........ Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drama.......William J. Gorman
iteraryEditor.........-Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Edtor.... Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors-Editorial Board Members
Frank E. Cooper Henry J. Merry
Williami C. Gentry Robert L. Sloss
Charles R. Kauffman Walter W. Wilds
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Bertram Askwith Lester May
Helen Barc Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nichol
Mary L. Behymer William Page
Alla H.Berman Howard H. Peckhair
Allanhu. Bermntin Hugh Pierce
AthurH. Bernsten Victor Rabinowitz
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Thomas M. Cooley Jeannie Roberts
Helen Domine Joseph A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ruwitch
Catherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
Carl F. Forsythe Cecelia Shriver
Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowl
Ruth Gallmeyer Adsit Stewart
Rtv Geddes S. CadwellSwanson
Ginevra Ginn Jane Thayer
JackGoldsmith MargaretLThompson
Emily Grimes Richard L. Tobin
Morris Groverman Robert Townsend
Margaret :Harris Elizabeth Valentine
,J Cullen Kennedy Harold O, Warren, Jr.
Jean Levy G. Lionel Willens
ussell E. McCracken Barbara Wright
Df'orotiiy Magee Vivian Zimit
Bruce J. Manley
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising.............T. Hollister Mabley
Advertising......... ..Ser wo Halverson
Advertising............herwood A. Upton
Service....... ..........eorge A. Spater
Circulation........ .... .J. Vernor Davis
Accounts..................John R. Rose
Publicaions..........George R. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistants
Byrne AI. Badenoch Marvin Kobacker
James E. Cartwright Lawrence Lucey
Robert Crawford Thomas Muir
Harry B. Culver George R. Patterson
Thomas'M. Davis Chares Sanford
Norman Eliezer Lee Slayton
James Hoffer oseph Van Riper
Norris Johnson Jbcrt Williamson
Charles Kline William R. Worboy
Dorothy BloongardiierM ice McCully
Laura Codling Sylvia Miller
Agnes Davisr elen E. Musselwhite
Bernice Glaser Eleanor Walkinshaw
;Hortense Gooding Dorothea Waterman
Night Editor-ROBERT L. SLOSS
SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1930.

Obviously President Hutchins has
in mind nothing mote or less than
the "University college," which has
just been indefinitely postponed at
Michigan. We believe that his es-
pousal of the project is a further
proof of his clear thinking along
pedagogical lines and of his ad-
ministrative vigor. It seems to :
augur an administration refresh-
ingly free from the grooved and
hidebound traditions of an out-
grown past and capable of making
distinctive contributions to the sci-
ence of higher education.
Especially we wish him success
in the development of what he
terms the "collegiate division," for
if it proves efficacious in eradicat-
ing the shortcomings of the literary
college at Chicago, it will stimulate
similar reorganization here. Our
faculty seems temporarily bedevil-
led by a conservatism that has
killed progress through its intent-
ness on resisting change, and blind-
ed itself to the bad in its palpitat-
ing anxiety to preserve the good.
In this condition Michigan has lost
the power of creating such a brain-
child as the University college full-
fledged, and must copy from
abroad.
STILL A PUZZLE.
Eight of the twelve months now
completed by the Hoover regime
have been spent by the Senate in
debating the tariff bill, and the
ultimate result is still as much a
puzzle as ever. The eight months
have served only to expose a lack
of political leadership over the up-
per house.
The tariff measure was intended
by the administration to aid only
he' farmers, but the House and
Senate finance committees boosted
all the rates. However, in the Sen-
ate proper the bill was seized upon
by the coalition of Democrats and
Republican insurgents and, inde-
pendents for a general downward
revision that is now in progress.
The coalition is held together by
common enemies: Hoover and high
tariff, all of which is exceedingly
paradoxical since Hoover himself
does not want high tariff. Thus
the coalition is saving him from
the dilemma of having either to
offend the high-protection wing of
his party by vetoing a high-tariff
bill or to refute his campaign
promise of limited tariff revision.
Hoover may not have the oppor-
tunity to accept the coalition mea-
sure, however, for the Democrats,
not wishing to aid him, may turn
and defeat the bill, or else, and this
is more likely, n the House-Senate
committee conference the solidity
o f the House delegation may force
the rates up again. Yet the pos-
sibility of a relatively low-tariff
bill's passing both the Congress and
the President is large enough to
cause worry among the Old Guard
Republicans, who built the party
out of "protecting" American in-
dustries (though they are the most
advanced and stable in the world)
and collecting campaign funds. If
the party is to retain its potency it
must continue to "protect" indus-
try, so the Hoover decision on the
tariff matter is quite significant.
Hoover's choice here, as on other
matters, will not be based on party
interests but on what he himself
thinks best. That is his nature,
but the result is the antagonizing

of all groups in the Senate, but
one. That one is the collection of
30-odd Senators who believe only
in echoing the White House and
who have but slight power.
The President must unify enough
groups to form a majority before
he can have his projects enacted.
but he was never a strictly party
man and so cannot be a real party
leader. His supporters believe that
the approaching Congressional
elections will benefit him by re-
turning men more acquiscent to
his views, but history shows that
in elections Republican Congress-
men usually unite and bamboozle
!he country into 'sending them
back. Thereupon they split again
unless some political leader arises.
Hoover niust either drop some
of his ideals in favor of party unity
or else continue to find his way
blocked by the stampeding of an-
tagonized groups in the Senate.
- -o
And now that spring is about
here, we note the first double play
of the season-Tardieu to Chau-
temps to Tardieu.

MUMPS
AND
M4EASLES. nm

If the rumored epidemic of
mumps and measls continues to
rage through. the cast of the Junior
Girls' play it won't be long before
"State Street" will have to be called
"The Alley," with an all-star solo-
ist.
* * *
And before I get off the subject
state that V-- B. W-, local
director, has at last decided to in-
feet Play Production with Shake-
speare-or perhaps it's the other
way around. According to all re-
ports Director W had a pretty
awful time trying to decide what
to do, but finally made up his mind
to do "The Merchant of Romeo and
Juliet."
* * *
The Rolls Photograph Pherret
was on the job constantly through-
out the ordeal and got this unusual
snapshot just two minutes before
the final decision.
* *\*
Photograph Pherret, by the way,
is the correct name for the Rolls
Pictorial Service representative.
Yesterday he was called the .Photo-
graph Pherrit, and a proof reader
tried to make it "Ferret." Maybe
we'll get it right some day.
* * *
I have, as I hinted, discovered
the identity of the lady who lost
the close-fitting hat. She was the
winner of Ann Arbor's Popularity
contest held last August and the
hat was one of the many prizes she
received. I find that it was not
raspberry in color but black and
shaped, sewed and pasted to order
just for her. And cost tuh-WENTY
five BUCKS!
* * *
An observer tells me she was
seen peeking in the rubbish box in
front of the Union yesterday, hop-
ing that the hat might be reposing
there. Too bad I didn't see her in
time to tell her I saw nothing of
it while searching for United Cigar
coupons early yesterday morning.
* * *
There is no spy system on campus,
states a letter in CAMPUS OPIN-
ION. In that case I am very much
1 grieved that such an accusation
was made. It must have been a lit-
tle bird that caused all the trouble.
Nasty old birdie.
* * *
The advance notices of the Pen-
ny Carnival seem to indicate a
swell time for all those who are
pennywise. Among other things it
seems you'll be able to get a mani-
cure for a cent. The story did not
say, however, whether the entire
manicure would be a cent or
whether it would be charged for
on the digit system, in which case
it would cost a dime and ruin the
budget I've worked out.
* * *
The admission fee will be a cent,
so you'd better take an extra nickel
along to preclude any chance of
getting into a financial jam.
*.'j

THAT'S GOOD.
Dear Joe: I stood on the Library
seal for one minute this morning
'and during that time not a soul
stepped on it. Isn't that encourag-
ing ?
Arelius Zip.
* * *

Music And Drama
TONIGHT: In the Mendelssohn
Theatre, beginning promptly ati
8:15, Play Production's last per-
formance of The Showoff by
Gearge Kelly.
THE SHOWOFF.
A Review by William J. Gorman
"The great American comedy"
bumps along pleasantly enough
with itsfive-minute alternations of
drama and vaudeville to its amaz-
ingly preposterous ending. Kelly's
rather cautious ear for certain
speech cliches in his two main cre-
ations gains him the intellectual
confidence of his audience early in
the play. Everyone then assumes,
(with the remarkable susceptibil-
ity induced by the heat of the
playhouse) that Kelly is a great:
observer, a real student of human
nature. The result is continuous
laughter, too enthusiastic and cer-
tainly uncritical. But there is no
fighting a play that has made the
stock route for five years and sur-
vived two movies. It has won its
battles: thousands of people will
testify: but it's so amusing. But
one would like to insist that it is
not the type of victor Play Pro-
duction, however horrible its finan-
cial misery, should be presenting.
It is presented quite well though.
Harry Allen, as Aubrey Piper,
thrusting his blatant mediocrity
on long-suffering relatives, dotting
every five words with a raucous,
barber-shop laugh, is quite success-
ful. He has pushed himself into the
part, with its demand as to body
poses, loud unpleasannt voice, and
brave, dominating stage presence
quite cOmpletely. He also manages
to shade the bombastic bumptious-
Iness with the proper degree of pa-
thos: pathos that God should have
granted him as a character such
reverberating incapacity.
Mildred Todd, however, just
about sweeps the show. She has
an extremely intelligent (or it may
be intuitive) capacity for activity,
for doing things on the stage, for
moving. She is mature in this
play. There is never a dangling
hand, groping vaguely for someth-
ing natural to do. She has a whole
body in the show. To all appear-
ance she is completely absorbed. in
the part. Her vocal reading of the
long script the part of Mrs. Fisher
gives her is almost invariably suc-
cessful too. She is really grand as
the aged woman who has a per-
verse, unsentimental backdoor way
of being the tender mother, and a
unswerving solution for all life's
problems. There may be an objec-
tion that Miss Todd burlesques the
part. Of course, she does. But the
objection hardly holds, for the part
is obviously over-written, consist-
ing of nothing but a long string of
variations on: "Every sweater I
start I swear will be the last one"
and "I knew it, that rattlebrain
could never, etc.' Miss Todd has
had in the past rather a marked
tendency in all her character work
to- punh it off into burlesque be-
cause :desiring to realize all the
amusement possibilities of the
parts. Here it was exactly the
thing t do and the role is one of

the best things done on the cam-
pus this year.
Dora Vandenburg is quite ade-
quate as Clare, who smooths all the
tangles of Piper's prevarications,
and cl ngs to her bitter tragedy of
an unloved wife. Helen Workman's
woi-k is still unsatisfactory becausej
- she gains expression in her voice
not by nuances of quality but solelyI
by quantity.
---o
THE MUSIC MASTER.
Beginning next Tuesday night,
the Detroit Civic Theatre is reviv-
ing the old Belasco success built
around the life of Anton von Bu-
low, with the title role being taken
by Walter 'Sherwin, The kindly
German musician was quite thel
favorite of the older playgoer; his
reception by a younger generation
hardly familiar or sympathetic
with the unostentatious, sentimen-
tal gaiety of the older Bohemian
life will be more questionable.
The play is an episodic chopping
of the life of Von Bulow: his strug-
gle to keep his musical ideals even
when Bricklayer's Union calls a
sympathetic strike of the Musici-'
an's Union because a certain mu-
sic-hall is to be built with non-un-
ion bricks: his sentimental delight
in the humorous love-affair of
Poons, the young German violinist
quite completely in love with the,

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DA NCING
at the
ARMORY -
Every
WED. AND SAT. NITE
Hot Music By
BEN'S
BLUE BLOWERS
Everybody Welcome

S'TURDAY, MARCH 1, 1930
Junior Girl's Play
IN THE 26th ANNUAL PRODUCTION
Presents-
"State Stre t
A Campus Musical Comedy
Lydia Mendelss n
I--
ADVANCE MAIL ORDER SALE BEGINS
MARCH THIRD
Send Stamped Self-Addressed Envelo"e to .Jane Yearnd, Betsy Barbour
House, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
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FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Min., Rev. Arthur W. Stalker, D. D.
Associate Minister, Rev. Samuel J.
.Harrison Student Director, Mr.
Ralph Johnson. Mrs. Alhira Win.
ters, Advisor of Women Students.

.t

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Ainister
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor
for University Women.

G

HILLEL FOUNDATION
513 E. University Dial 3779
7:30 P. M.-Dr. Moritz Levi, Amer-
ica's professor will speak at the
services, on "WAR AND PEACE,"
at the chapel of the Michigan
League. Irving Yorysh will read
services.
8:30 P. M.--Open House at the
Foundation.

10:30 A. M.--Morning Worship.
Comm union Sevice. "TI'ilE SONG
AND THE CROSS," Dr. Stalker.
12:00 M.--Four Discussion Groups
for Students. Leaders: Miss Ellen
W. Moore, Prof. S. F. Gingerich,
Prof. G. . Carrothers, and Mr.
Ralph R. Johnson.
6:00 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild De-
votional Meeting. Topic: "LIFE
AND TECHNIQUE." Leader:
Stanley McGilliard.
7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship.

10:4i3 A. M.--Morning Worship,
Sermon: "Shall We Scrap tLhe
Church?"
12:00 Noon-Student Class, Prof.
l. Y. McCluksy, tcalher .
5:30 to 7:30 P. M.-Social lour
and Young People's Meeting.
Leader.

11-

CHICAGO TO THE FORE.*

Yesterday Robert Maynard Hut-
chins, youthful president of the
University of Chicago,- added his
name to the list of university ad-
ministrators who are dissatisfied
with the presenijset-up of the coun-
try's literary colleges. His objec
tions are chiefly to the emphasis
on hoirs credit instead of mental
capacity, and to the lock-step sys-
tem of instruction whereby the
bright and dull are both carried
along in the same classroom. It will
be noticed that these are substan-
tially the objections voiced by The
Daily to Michigan's literary col-
lege.
President Hutchins also recog-
nizes the fundamental pedagogical
axiom that a student learns more
from solving an academic problem
on his own initiative than from
constant classroom goading, and
he emphasizesathe corollary of this
axiom, that a student will find
keener stimulation in a thorough
investigation of one subject than
in the acquisition of a lot of smat-
tering knowledge. As soon as a
freshman or sophomore has' dem-
onstrated his right to advancement
by his "reaction to the university's
opportunities and his own quali-
fications for advanced work," Pres-
ident Hutchins believes "he should
begin the study of some division of
knowledge of particular interest to
him and with which he is qualified
to deal." In his special field the
student should have a minimum
of instruction and put forth a
maximum of independent effort.
Most interesting in view of the
local situation is the way in which
President Hutchins proposes to ac-
complish these several desiderata.
He would split Chicago university
into three divisions: the collegiate
for general orientation, the univer-
sity division for specalized work,
and the graduate school for sub-
stantially its present purpose. The
business of the first division would
be to start the student on his edu-
cation chiefly by giving him en

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
On East Huron, west of State
Rev. R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister for
Students. ,
9:45 A. M.-Church Bible School.
10:30 A. M.-Worship. Sermon by
Mr. Sayles, "THE GOD I BE.
LIEVE IN," (Second in Special
Series).
9:45 A. M.-At Guild House, Rich-
ard Vander Kam, '30 Ed., will
lead discussion or Religious Prog-
ress in America.
5:00-6:00 P. M.-Special Radio
Service, Dr. Harry Emerson Fos-
dick, preacher. Atwater-Kent Ra-
dio installed by courtesy of Stof-
-et's.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)

TUNE
Sunday

of the
DETROIT UNITY CENTER,
br-&ast from
Tu Detroit Civic Theatrs
11:30 A.M. Basternwnd. Thime
10:30 A.LCentral Stand.Tim.
WjR
)Detoit
EVERY THURSDAY EV'G
(Beirnaing Jan 9, 1930)
LECTURE ON PRINCIPLES
OF SUCCESSFUL LIVING
Si" *forth the Pricpes by whic
i a may unfold vwithn his life the
Hesth, Peace and Prosperity which
od baia provided. (
S1-.05S P.M. Eastern Stand. Tim*
1,0:03 P.M. Centrl Stand. Tima

al

IN !
Morning Service

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
State and William
Allison Ray Hoips, Minister
February 23, 1930
Sunday, March 2nd, 1930
10:45 A. M--Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "The Prophet Who
Was Ready to Quit."
5:30 to 6:00 P. M.--Studcnt Fel-
lowship Social Hour.
6:00 to 6:30 P. M.-Fellowship
Supper.
6:30 P. M.-Illustrated Lecture by
Professor Arthur E. Boak,
"Archaeological Work in Egypt."

Fourth Ave. between Packard
William
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.

and

BE CONSISTENT
IN YOUR RELIGION
ATTEND CHURCH

A CONFESSION.
Dear Joe: I've been trying to
keep it a secret but my conscience
has been torturing me and I mint
tell you what I've done. Yesterday
afternoon I stepped on the Library
seal.
The Beachcomber.
. Tissick, tissick! Well, anyway, it
all goes to show that the student
body is gradually becoming seal-
conscious.
A lot of people have been clamb-
ering to see the Opera substitute
which won the Rolls prize. With all
due respect to The Chink and The
Beachcomber I might as well say
that after you've read it you'll be
sorry you were so insistent. How-

10:00 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Conflict Between
Flesh and Spirit."
11:00 A. M.-GerGcran Service.
7:00 P. M. Young People's
League.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellihorn, Pastor
10:30 A. M.-Morning Service.
Sermon topic: "The Three Per.
mnanent Virtues."
12:00 M.-Student Bible Class.
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship and
Supper.

i1

l

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIS'I
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morining Serv-
ice. Sermon topic: "CHRIST
JESUS."

!--

REGULARLY

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division and Catherine Sts.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
Rev. T. L. Harris, Assistant
8:00 A. M.--l loly Counion.
(Stwclent chapel in 1-Jarvis Hall.)
9::30 A. M.-Church School. (Kin.
dergarten at 11 o'clock.)
11:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
Sermon by Mr. Lewis of the
Church Mission House, New York.
6:30 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall, followed by two
study groups led by Dr. John
Dorsey and Miss Lois Benson.
7:45 P. M.-Evening Prayer; ad-
dress by Mr. Lewis, "The Miracle
at the Seating of the Five Thou-
sand."
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sta.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
9:00 A. M.--German.
10:00 A. M.--Bible Class.
11:00 A. M.-English. Sermon.
"The Wicked Husbandman."
6;00 P. M.-Studcnt Supper.
6:30 P. M-Prof. John L. Muy-
shens will be the speaker.
7:30 P. M.-Holy Communion
Service in English.
WELCOME!

Martin Jensen, the aviator, who
flew his plane a mile upside down
and backward, was probably
prompted to this action by the per-
formance of the Senate with the
tariff bill.

11:45 A. M.-Sunday School follow-
ing the morning service.
7:30 P. M.--Wednesday tvenigI
testimonmal meeting.
The Reading Room, 10 and 11
State Saving Bank Budding, is open
daily from 1 2 to 5 o'clock, except
Sundays and legal holidays.

11

11

6:30 P. M.-Music
the auspices of a
mittee.

Festival under
student co.n-

11

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