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June 03, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-06-03

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN nATT y

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1, iHF 171 CV A. 1r V A t' r~A ..,1TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1930

Published every morning exeept Mondayr
Suring the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conferenc Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
atches credited to it or not otherwise credited
nthis paper and ythe local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
Of postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
toaster General.
Subscription by carrier. $4.0e; by sail,
04 o-.
(ffrices :Ann Arbor Press Building, May-1
hard Street.
Phontes: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21r4.
EDITORIAL STAFF,
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman........George C. Tiley1
City Editor................Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor................Donald J. Kline
Sports Editor......Edward L. Warner, Jr.
W omen's Editor.......... .Marjorie Yollmet
Telegraph Editor.......Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drana......WilliamJ. Gorman
Literary Editor......... Lawrence R. Klein'
,Assistant City Editor. .. . Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors-Editorial Board Memb~ers
Frank E Cooper henry J. Merry
William C. Gentry Robert L. dloss
Charles R. Kauffman Walter W. Wild
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Morris Alexander. Bruce J. Manley j
Bertram Askwith Lester May
Helen Bare Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nicmol
Mary L. B3ehymer William Page
Allan H. Berkman Howard H. Peckham
Arthur J. Bernstein Ilugh Pierce
.Barth onger Victor Rabinowt
ThoaM. Cooley Jeannie Roberts
bs
Helen 1Domine Josep~h A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ruwitch
Catherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
Carl F. Forsythe Cecelia Shriver
Sheldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowl
RuthGallmeyer Adsit Stewart
Ruth Geddes S. Cadwell Swanadd
Ginevra Ginn Jane Thayer
ack Goldsmith Margaret Thompo
Emily Grimes' Richard L. Tobin
Morris Coverma Robert Townsend
Margaret Harris Elizabeth Valentine
Cul tn Kennedy Harold O. Warren, Jr.
cfelan Levy G. Lionel Willens
ussell EMcCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zix.is
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising ........... T. Iollister Mabley
Advertising ............Kasper I-. Halverson
Service.................. George A. Spater
Circulation ................. J. Vernor Davis
Accounts...................John R. Rose
PublicationsG............George R. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistanvs
James E. Cartwright Thomas Muir
Robert Crawford George R. Patterson
Thomas M. Davis Charles Sanford
N~orman' Eliezer JLee Slayton
Norris Johnson Joseph Van Riper
Charles Kline Robert Williamson
Marvin Kobacker William R. Worboy
Women Assistants on the Business
Staff.
Marian Atran Mary Jane Kenan
Dorothy Bloomgarden Virginia McComb
Laura Codling Alice McCully
Ethel Const-s Sylvia Miller
I osephine Convisser An n Verner
Bernice Glaser r Iorothea Waterman
Anna Goidherger Joan Wiese
Hortense Goodiug

I

machine does not appear to have
an opportunity to get votes. Are
the monied interests in control?
Two plans have been advanced
whereby the situation might be
remedied. The first is to limit by
law the amount which a candidate
may spend in running for office.
This, however, would not help the

* TASED ROLL
A
DECOMPOSITE
COLUMN.j
Here I am back from the north-j

Music and Drama
0 -

li

TONIGHT: First performance
by Play Production of "Jonica
Starrs" by Elizabeth W. Smith, in
University Hall auditorium, at
8:15.

poorer candidates. The second; ern wilds, feeling about half as de-
plan advocates a government fund, lighted-if any- as ever to be going
from which expenses of all candi- to school these last weeks. One
dates are to be paid through gov- bright spot on the horizon is that
ernment officials. Both plans aret
highly theoretical, but logical. Un- the Rolls prophesyer seems to have
til, however, some method is de- been absolutely flawless in its fore-
veloped that will check the orgy of casts. You may remember that I
spending that accompanies the foretold freezing, weather until
election of the people's represen- shortly before exams and 90 de-
tatives, it will appear that votes
are being bought and sold, and grees from then on. My wildest
elections will not constitute the dreams seem to be fulfilled.

3

expression of the people's choice.
o
Campus Opinion
Cotributors are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less than loo
works of possible. Anonymous coA-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial I
opinion of The Daily.!
JEWS PROTEST PALESTINE BAN.
To the Editor:
There came in The Detroit Free

Funny how the boys get re-
ligion about this time of year,
though. I went to one of my
lectures for the second time
this semester and found that
fully half of those taking the
course were there. Most of
them had even arrived a bit
early so as to get to sleep be-
fore the discourse started. One
of them was conscious, how-
ever, as may be seen by the

Press newspaper, the issue of May following, although I have not
30, a notice under the above title, checked up on the figures suf-
that "two hundred Jewish organi- ficiently to guarantee their ac-
zations will meet Tuesday (today) curacy. I will assume that
to adopt resolutions of there was no foul play, and
t that Elmer really did stay
against the suspension of Jewish awake all that time, impossible
immigration to Palestine, by the as it may seem.
British colonial office." For this, Here's the story:
we like to remind those two hun-
dred organizations that as much Dear Dan:
as they are anxious to deprive the At the last ec lecture, I timed
Palestine Arabs of their majority the prof. He spent 38 minutes
rights, by intluxing their country ; looking over at the left hand side
with a dissatisfied and heterogene- of the room, 10 minutes at the
ous class of scattered Jews, the . h
Aras temslve ae eualy ax-right hand side, and two minutes
Arabs themselves are equally anx- at his notes. Boy, these co-eds.
ious to defend their country We got out ten minutes early!!
against any such danger. Elmer.
We will let the world judge be-
tween us - the Arabs choose to
live peacefully in their, own land; By the way fellows, won't forget
but the Jews cross thousands of the competition. That puts Elmer
miles, in order to satisfy the whim within four accepted contributions
of such organizations, by attempt- of an assistant editorship. All you
ing to reduce the Palestine Arabs gents that have an eye on this
into a state of economic serfdom job for next year better get busy.
and drive them out to the desert. I never reached my exalted posi-
What we hope is that, in case of tion by loafing. Some of the boys
future disturbances occurring in even show a certain unkind scep-
Palestine, the American press will ticism about my having reached it
be fair enough as to analyze the at all.

LADY WINDERMERE'S FAN.
A Review by William J. Gorman.
The local unattainability of
comedy" became a despairing tru-
ism in Mr. Askren's dramatic criti- i
cism last year. It was very true
then because of the consistent
avoidance of high comedy by most
of the student organizations and
the horrible wrenching Mimes gave
Noel Coward. It is still essentially
true.
Miss Anglin's direction of Lady
Windermere's Fan, then, becomes
important not only as per sobut as
a fine textbook. Throughout it is
marked by a sensitive intelligence
that knows how to make itself ef-
fective theatrically. She knows how
to keep the production flirting with
realism so as to give it solidity and
yet make a pleasantly artificial
atmosphere predominate. This
achievement of the fete galante
atmosphere is particularly remark-
able insLady Windermere's Fan,
filled as it is with borrowed con-
lescensions to the 1890 taste in
plots and emotions. Miss Anglin in
direction keeps these Sardou and I
Dumas elements minor and con-
centrates on the Aubrey Beards-
ley.
All this ingenuity and epigram-
matic coruscation of Wilde's might
very well become stationary. Miss
Anglin keeps it in motion by work-
ing subtly in contrasts of all sort:
contrasts of tempo, contrasts of'
style in the actors, contrasts of
emotional reactions: all with the
aim of producing that fine beam
of the mental interior toward
which high comedy is written.
Up to the third act, all the emo-
tions of the people in the play ex-
cept Lady Windermere, are finely
exaggerated to suggest that there
aren't any emotions but merely the
desire for them. Then when the
group of men in the third act who
have been talking and talking dis-
cover that the fan they have joked
about is Lady Windermere's, they
merely step back quietly and de-
liberately with "Irish" restraint. i
This is a good example of the
rhythm of pleasing significances
Miss Anglin gets by varying the
styles of the actors.
The whole scene of conversation
between the men in that act is
made delightful rather than dull,
as it very well might be, by the
contrasts in their tempos of de-
livery: Cecil Graham's absurdly
l smooth speed, Lord Augustus' pleas-
antly senile bursts of indignation
and relapses into drawling, Mr.
Dumby's slow drunken drollery.
Miss Anglin's direction and most
of the acting has Style: so that
sincere representation and genu-
ineness and that sort of thing can
be safely ignored for the more cor-
rect notive of finely artificial levit-
ation. This is done throughout and
the result is very good comedy.
Just as last week, the outstand-
ing performances came from Miss
Anglin and Ainstworth Arnold. She
has a nice interpretation of Mrs.
Erlynne; that is, a nice feeling for
the character with a mature, gen-
uine flexibility df emotion that
Wilde was continually suggesting
and now and then realizing Mise

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Satisfaction is assured
you.
WENZEL'S
207 E. LIBERTY

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[1IIIt15

TUESDAY, JUNE 3, 1930
Night Editor: CARL S. FORSYTHE.
THE PRICE OF VOTES.
With Senator Nye's investigation
committee about to commence their
task of determining whether or not
the senatorial candidates spent too
much money in getting nominated
this spring, it will be of interest to
all American voters to see whether
they decide that money will get
men elected, or whether the Senate
will limit the amount that may' be
spent in getting nominated and
elected.
Back in 1924, if we remember
correctly, Senator Newberry, of our
own state, chose to resign from the
senate following the discovery that
his fellow members thought $198,-
000 was too much money to spend
in getting the Republican nomin-
ation. Mrs. Ruth Hanna McCor-
mick spent $250,000 in the Illinois
primary as against about one-
tenth of that sum spent by her un-
successful opponent, and there
have been no indignant senatorial
outbursts so far. When William
Vare got the Pennsylvania nomin-
ation at a cost of $800,000. they did
object to the extent of excluding
him from the chamber. Joe Grun-
dy, who was appointed to his place
by Governor Fisher, promptly pro-
ceeded to spend $332,000 in an ef-
fort to succeed himself, and failed.
Why is it that the cost of elections
are so high today?
Mr. Vare tried to justify his ex-
penditures by the plea that the!
other candidates were spending
plenty of money in certain districts,
and that he was forced to do thel
same. Mrs. McCormick argued that
since her opponent was the present
senator, he had the assistance of
patronage on his side. And Joe
Grundy claimed that with his op-,
ponent backed by a machine or-
ganization, which would get votes
regardless of the qualifications of
the candidate, he had to spend

plans of these Jewish organizations
and show their influence in the de-
velopment of those disturbances.
Arab Students Union,
Hann Khalaf, Pres.
0-
A WARNING TO MONARCHISTS.
To the Editor:

.
.i
i
tl
-
>
;
,_
,
l
.
.
,#
;
.
I

I take this unparalleled op-
portunity to announce a
sweeping victory for the He
Men's Club in their "Coatless
Shirt Campaign." Even nature
herself, the all-seeing mother
of us all, smiles benignly down

r , c ,;

He was "born in this country of upon their efforts, and cor
hard-working, self-made people, verts the most stubborn an
who struggled to put him thru unbelieving malcontents to th
college. . . . He became dissatisfied ,glorious movement of emanc
with his lot. . . . The peace and pation of the down-trodde
contentment (and ignorance?) of male sex from the insidiou
his childhood days were gone. . . .wiles of the feminists. Let's a
Finally he woke up to the folly of i support it now in its hour o
the whole process," and became a triumph, for after all, we an
liberal monarchist - with whom all in the same bote . .. bao'.
as monarch? (Ssh-himself?-or bott . . . aw shucks . . . vesse
perhaps, well, if monarchs are ,
hard to get, how about me?) !
I thought the argument about AMONGST THE WANT ADS.
the main purpose of life-work or WANTED-A neat and mod
pleasure - had been settled long ; apartment for three days, June
ago when someone decided that 22, and 23. Must be private.
the oriental philosophy was best. Hmmm.
adapted to those people who hadI

n-
id
he
i-
en
us
11
of
re
el.

Sale of Sprn Shoes.
A few outstanding bargains
Church's British $13.50, Now $8.95
Johnston Murphy $14.00, Now $8.95
Our Own Big Ten $10, Now $6.95
All styles reduced including sport shoes

C

:!

.
fern

m WAW v4 V Vi .. V p Y 1V 1W fCL o1 w nn1 i g. c
no resourses. They might as well Anglin manages the sudden shifts
say to themselves that their life is ROLLS' POETRY CORONER. from intense interest in the Lord
the best. But for those nations with ' Iand Lady Windermere situation to
enormous resourses, for those peo- I am deeply grieved to announce tinkling mockery of her slave Lord
ple who have the possibility of a! that the Poetry Coroner has at last Augustus very effectively: that is,
choice the orienetal resignation to ' succumbed to appoplexy brought wittily enough to be very amusing
necessity was merely kept around on and caused by the sort of stuff yet subtly enough to make the wit
in theory. It doesn't make bad that he has been getting from the seem to be important revelation of
conversation. And it really sounds campus poets of late. Below is a , character.
interesting when not discussed too ; fair specimen which ought to con- Then, too, Miss Anglin still has
seriously. If one who signs him- vne anyone that he is happier that communicable energy of joy
self "A Liberal Monarchist" is ser- and better in his present resting in the task which marks the great
ious, let him recall the times in place than in this vale of tears. comedienne. There are sugges-
history when the masses became ; Here is the heavy blunt instrument tions of a triumph in the very no-
unwilling to produce for the ex- which was used by the murderer. tion of the part she's playing, and
clusive enjoyment of the leisure There was a young man from the way she's playing it, emanat-
classes. On several occasions the AAnn Arbor ing from her. A great actress does
masses have withdrawn their sup- Whose thoughts were too nasty this: .that is, plays her part and
port. And the crust caved in, caus- to harbor communicates herself simultane-
ing many fatalities among those He used to bite babies i ously.
of the upper crust. In hopes they'd get rabies Mr. Arnold's achievement seems
Therefore, do not ignore the After eating at old Betsy Bar- simple: he merely exploits the wit
power of the masses merely be- bour. in his technique very notably and
cause a perfect democracy has not; adds verve to every scene he is in.
been brought into existence. Let One Lung. It seems simple.
ulac ofpgrfwctyn.caleays.fthe If I ever ask anyone to finish a Miss Loomis had the difficult
ck ofperfection. Some day there limerick again, I . . no I won't task of making the play what the
may be the complete achievementIither.author's temperament hardly al-
I of the many ideals of the masses. ! lowed it to be-a melodrama. I !
Those ideals are vague, but never- . don't t se--a vermu.eI
theless, they are sensed by most THOUGHTS WHILE ATTENDING d f Hr ls as hver, ws-
of the herd. Reactionaries and CLASS. ful. Her last act, however, was
I very charming.

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