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May 23, 1930 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-23

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0

PAGE TWO
CHEMiST iSCOVERS
FRMUL TO RAISEt U l

T H E MleC ICHA N D A TI 1

MRIDAY, MAY 23, 1930

~ARATIONS NEAR COMPLETION IN CARDING TON E uLrIuIj

PREP

AR ATI N S NE AR COMPLE TIOC IN C ARINGT '
FOR ATLANTIC FLIGHT OF ENGLISH DIRIGIBLE, R-100
* MAI'T I ME 1TO
0 " Canada Steamship Co. Display
........ , :.h ' ' .":it 1 .4 f '~N. ?}iShows Shipping Growth

Mayor Walker Selects
Successor to Whalen

PROFESSORl CAlNE
'ILL RETURN HERE

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M chigan Scientist Originates
Method for Increasing
Gas Efficiency.
NOT TO BE COMMERCIAL

States Blended Fuel Mixture
Suitable for Any Kind
of Weather.
(By Associated Press)
TULSA, Oklahoma, May 22-Dis-
covery of a more powerful gasoline,
a blend especially for automobiles,
was announced at the Natural Gas-
oline association's annual cOnven-1
tion today.
The mixture restores what the
motorist likes to call "the old fash-
ioned goodness" to gasoline, by
which he means quick, easy, start-
ing in cold weather. It is described
also as adding power which the
"old time" gas never had, and as
increasing the available gasoline
supply.
The blending formula is a gift
to the petroleum industry, in the'
form of bulletin 14 from the de-
partment of 'engineering research
of University of Michigan. It is
rnon-commercial, anyone who wish-
es being free to use it. The devel-
opment was sponsored by the Nat-
ural Gasoline Association of Amer-
ica, and was done under direction
of George Granger Brown, profes-
sor of chemical engineering and di-
rector of research for the associa-
tion. He presented today the final
result of work which began four
years ago.
New Methods Possible.
He said his findings enable oil
refiners to produce gasoline not on-
ly specially adapted to the modern
automobile, but particularly fitted
or all ranges of temperature en-
countered in the United States.
He restores to gasoline two in-
gredients which have been largely
removed in recent years lay the
methods of production and refining.
One of these is natural gasoline,
found in the natural gas removed
at the well mouth. It is highly vo-
latile, vaporizing so readily that it
fires easily in cold weather.
The other restored substance
which gives the added power in hot
weather is .naptha, usually remov-
ed in the refining and sold as such
or included in kerosene. Its effect
is opposite from that of natural
gasoline, retarding vaporization. It
comes into use when the engine is
hot. In that stage the acceleration
of modern engines tends to cause
completely vaporizing fuel to choke
and drag. Possibly most of the nap-
tha never Vaporizes, Prof. Brown
said. ,I
Doesn't Retard Vaporizing.
But it does not interfere with the
much desired vaporizing when
starting or running at low or medi-
um temperatures, while at high
temperatures it effectively prevents
that loss in power figuratively at-
tributed to ,some high-test gasoline.
"Such a blending product," said
Prof. Brown, "having at least 34
per cent vaporized even at low tem-
peratures and not more than 75 per
cent vaporized at high tempera-
tures, is actually far superior to the
original material which may be
completely vaporized. This state-
ment ,is contrary tp the common
impression that a fuel should be
completely vaporized to give the
best performance on modern motor I
cars.' _
TWO CARS CRASH
ON CAMPUS SITE
Two automobiles, one driven by
Mrs. Catherine Langford, 1007
Church street,a coach driven by,
George Sautter, 448 South Seventh
street, collided shortly after 2 o'-
x clock yesterday afternoon at the
corner of East and South Univer-
sity avenues. Although Sautter's
car was somewhat damaged when
it careened into a telephone pole,
tearing the top, neither of the driv-
ers were hurt. Both were alone in
their cars.
Mrs. Langford was driving south
on East University and Sautter

was headed east on South Univer-
sity. Although details of the acci-
dent'weie not clearly established, it
was thought that both drivers at-
tempted to cross the intersection
at the same time, causing Sautter's l
car to strike the southeast curbing.
Hundreds of University students
were attracted to the scene of the
accident which occurred between
1 and 2 o'clock classes.
Inspired by the spirit and gen-
eral tone of Texas State College
for Women. John Philip Sousa has
dedicated a new march. "Daughters
of Texas," to its faculty and stu-
dents.

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on Great Lakes.
INCLUDES NAVAL PLANS
Representing a history of mari- Z Q
time shippi'ng on the Great Lakes:
and illustrating the development of
vessels employed for Great Lakes
navigation from 1690 to 1929, water
color pictures, sketches, and draw- ...j
ings will be on display in the main
corridor of the East Engineering
building today by the Canada
Steamship company.
This marine museum collection
also includes plans, diagrams, 1 A ase le'aSI'ie
maps and sketches of naval dock- asoe S rhoto
yards, naval engagements and for- Edward P. Mulrooney,
tifications. It has been brought here Deputy chief inspector of the
by George A. Cutchbertson of the New York police department, who
Canada Steamship Lines who has was appoiuted police commissioner
drawn many of the pictures and by Mayor James Walker to succeed
sketches now on exhibit. Grover A. Whalen who has recent-

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' ~ TIn addition there will be 14
.-photographs and loaned pictures,
- as well as 34 maps, charts and
T;docuuments. The exhibi't is open to
.'CAR everyone and should be of special
EON - interest to naval architects, history
students, and engineers, according
to Cuthbertson. It will not be mov-
-ed for at least two weeks.
Assocte Press _1hoo.
b Fina eparations are being completed iu Cardington, England, for the flight of the giant British dirigi- Student Violinist,I
b 1e, RO-l, l cross the Atlantic to Canada. At left is mooring mast recently constructed at St. Hubert fieldLk o
near Montreal, for the airship. A view of the airship's deck is shown in center, and below, a map of the Pupil of Lockwood,j
route.
Will Appear Tonight
Nell, Dyk este rhouse
B 4 ADU ofR StumpESpeaker' L TS! George Poinar, pupil of Prof.
Samuel P. Lockwood, of the violin
Win Contest Finals n j department, will give a violin re-
' j H;ital at 8 o'clock toiight in the
Finals of the project speaking . O N 19, 95 LUSchool of Music auditorium. Ac-
-- contest and the hall -of Fame con- cording to Professor Lockwood,
Says Michigan Labor Department test were held by Sigma Rho Tau, Hdspital Official Again Chosen 1Poinar, who has been studying
Has Progressed Rapidly in "Stump Speakers" of the engineer- Head of Fund Caman with him for nearly two years, is
HeadrofeFund Campaign making remarkable progress. Re-
Past Few Years. ing college, Wednesday night at the Dodge Is Vice-president. 1 cently when Frederick Stock, direc-
Union clubrooms. Edward R. Nell, ---tor of the Chicago Symphony orch-
"More progress has been mad '30E, who spoke on "A Co-operative Dr. Harley A. Haynes, director estra heard him play, he offered
by the Michigan department of Bookstore for Michigan," was cho- of the University hospital, was re- him a scholarshop in Chicago.
labor and industry in the past sen winner of the first contest, elected president of the Ann Arbor Poinar will be accompanied by
while John Dykesterhouse, 33A,CJack Conklin, pianist, and assisted
three years than ever befor, ieJh yesehue 3 Comhmunity Fund association at a
r yr nbfore, whose -subject was "Sir Christopher mectin of the board of directors by Genevieve Griffey, violin, Merle
stated Eugene J. Brock, commis- Wren," won the Hall of Fame con- Walker, violat and Kathleen Mur-
ie, i re drs ntets Wednesday evening in the office of
sa~ner, in :a brief address on the test. tI ete c~a phy, cello.
history and functions of the de- Jerome M. Coman, '33E, speak- the executive secretary. he
Tegeneral public has been in-
partment, before a group of labor ing on "Thomas Alva Edison," won Di. Haynes, who is completing a vitd to attend the program which
and economic students yesterday honorable mention in the Hall of I three-year term on the board, har includes the following numbers:
afternoon. Fame contest. J. Ray Schnidgall, served as president of the associa- Mozart: Quartet in D Maor (Ko-
The department had its source '30E, and E. C. Briggs, '33E, who Lon during the past year. Prof. chel 575); Bach-Kreisler: Prelude
in a statistical department formed spoke on "An Airway to South Russell A. Dodge was chosen vice and Gavotte en Rondeau from the
for the tabulation of industrial in- America" and "A Project for the president to succeed William Inglis solo-Sonata in E Major; Porpora-
formation about sixty years ago, I Merchant Marine" respectively, and Herman Gross and Mrs. A. H. Kreiser: Minuet in D Major: Cor-
I he stated, and in 1880, two depart- were tied for second place in the White were re-elected treasurer eli-Spalding: LaFolia; Mendels-
ments, an accident department project speaking contest, while Ed- and secretary respectively. sohn: Concerto, Op. 64. .
and a labor department functioning win L. Cline, whose subject was Announcement of the acceptance ____-
separately were established by a I "Front Drive for Automobiles," won of the office of general chairman HUNDRED BELIEVED DEAD j
!state statute. third place. of the annual campaign for another AS FRENCH LINER BURNS.
In 1923, the' two departments After the contests an election of year by James Inglis was made at _
were combined into the department officers was held. Vernon C. Pras- the meeting and Prof. Dodge was (BY Associated I'rcss)1
of labor and industry and the pres- chan, '31E, was made general chair- named campaign executive direc- PORT SUDAN, Anglo-Egyptian
ent system of four commissioners man, James Nall Candler, '32E, re- tor . IjSudan, May 22-The French steam-
aone bthe governor includ- cording secretary, Briggs, corre- I Committee selections made in- i er Asia, withe1,500 pilgrims aboard,
ing one attorney was instituted. j sponding secretary, and Coan, lude Mrs. A. H. Goss as chairman; bound for Red Sea ports, was on
The chief functions of the de- treasurer of the service committee, C. H. Mc- I fire in Jeddah harbor today and
partment, he continued, are to pro- Kinley as publicity chairman, and it was feared 100 lives had been
vide beneficial facilities for labor- Badger Takes Students Don C. May as chairman of the lost. The others were reported sav-
ers in factories, to administer the Through Sugar Factory budget committee. ed by rescuing vessels.
Workmens' Compensation act,and IThe June meeting will be held The fire proved uncontrollable
to conduct a free employment bu- Prof. W. L. Badger of the chemi_ Wednesday, June 11, instead of the and the ship was aband-oned. This
reau. I cal engineering department has re- third Wednesday of the month, afternoon it was impossible to ap-
Deputy commissioners and- in- I turned from Toledo where he took 1 because of the University com- proach the vessel.. The pilgrims
spectors under the labor division 40 students from the advanced mencement activities. I were en route to Mecca.
Visit approximately 25,000 factories i chemical engineering courses on an ----___ _-____ ___
and merchantile establishments inspection tour through the Toledo
and issue about 4,000 special orders Sugar company. I 2 o--3:3iSTARTING
for the construction of sanitary The purpose of the trip was to D:0AY-:0
and protective improvements each give the students an idea of chemi- :
year. In only approximately 100 cal engineering equipment.__
cases is it necessary to prosecute in.----__
order to force the establishment toI UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-jLOUISCORAD
make the necessary improvement. Dr. Meiklejohn, chairman of the I
The present compensation divi- experimental college, has been ap- WOLHEIM NAGEL
sion has paid out more than $14,- pointed one of the nine American ,
000,000 to injured workers since jdelegates to the International Con- in
1923 and the heirs of workers killed gress of Philisophers.
in the factories. Under the present The congress, which convenes
per cent of the industrial institu- ford this year during the first weekTHE SHIP FRO I SHA NG HA I
tions of Michigan are under the of September.
compensati'on laws, passed in 1912-A revolver barks . . . a white uniformed officer falls . . . sudden
and amended in 1923. Prior to the Plans have been arranged to hold terror overwhelms a gay yachting varty on the China Sea . . . This
passage of these, it was necessary a reunion of Texas pioneer cattle- "Ship From Shanghai" is fine and exciting. It's fast and tense, it'll
for the injured to sue the employer men each year at Stamford. This I keep you on your feet throughout.
in common law courts. year's event is set for June 26-28.
~- -- - - ~--.
THE SCREEN'S
GREATEST ACT R"I
Last Times Today?:
POLICY
Matinee Evening
2:00-3:50 7:00-9:00
35c-lOc SOc, 25c "
in enlcrtainment event -of
outstanding iportancMARIE DRESSLER

With these stars With
p ffPOLLY MORAN AND ANITA PAGE
LOWELL SHERMAN ": 'E They learned how to clean-ur in Wall Street and then; they were ,
MARIAN' NIXON s 1AS rST AK r
HOBART BOSWOR1H

liy re-entered itne iusiness worldi.

iCHIANILLINOIS!
I Farrell to Take Eighteen Men
to Evanston for Meet
. This Afternoon.
(Continued From Page 1) !
ities in the iaif mile while Frisch
is considered strong in the ham-
ner. Wisconsin is also strong in
the relay.
While the rest of the teams in
the Conference are not of the cali-
I bre of the leading four, most of
'them can be figured to pick up
I some points. Chicago, injured by
I ineligiblilities and sprains, will
have Letts in the 440 and 880, if he
is able to run after being spiked,
in a meet recently. Root and East'
in the sprints and Boesel in the
I hammer are looked upon as possi-
bilities. Northwestern will come
to the meet with two probably first
place winners in Walter and Warne
in the 440 and pole vault. Wolff
may place in the 880 as well, and
should help the Purple relay team
j considerably.
I Iowa, Indiana, Purdue, and Min-j
ddnesotawill be represented by in-
Sdividualstars, but have no team
strength. Gordon in the broad
jump, Canby in the pole vault, and
Saling in the hurdles and the big
j Hawkeye threats. The Hoosiers
have a fast squad of runners head-
! ed by Clapham, Banks, and Leas,
while Minnesota is entering las
In the sprints, Strain in the mile,
Weiseger in the 880, and Munn in
the shot.

Former History Faculty Member
Will Give Courses on
Early America.
HAS TAUGHT AT BROWN
Returning to the University after
an absence of ten years, Prof. Ver-
nor W. Crane will be a very valua-
ble addition to the department of
history.
Professor Crane, whose appoint-
ment was officially approved- at the
last meeting of the Regents, was an
instructor here from L16 to 1920.
Since then he has been a professor
in American history at Brown uni-
versity and has also twice been a
guest professor at Harvard. Dur-
ing his absence he has been able to
keep in very close touch with the
University because he has been stu-
dying some of the old journals in
the Clements library from time to
time.
Professor Crane's specialty is
American History in the 17th and
18th century and it is this that will
be the subject of most of his courg-
es.
MILLER LECTURES
AT DENTAL DINNER
Discusses Different Types of
Guns Used in World War.
Col. Henry L. Miller, professor of
mechanism and drawing in the en-
gineering college, addressed a group
of 200 last night at the banquet of
the First District Dental society in
the Michigan League Building.
The talk dealt with the engineer-
ing and military phases of the "Big
Berthas," and was illustrated with
lantern slides.
The banquet culminated the an-
nual meeting of the first district
dental society in Ann Arbor.
A hundred dentists and a hun-
dred of the dental seniorsand hy-
gienists were present at the ban-
quet.
. These annual meetings of the va-
rious dental societies in Ann Ar-
bor are regarded as an excellent
means of maintaining alumni re-
lations with the University.
UNIVERSITY OF OHIO-Lght
reading won the approval of stu-
dents over more serious literature
by a large majority in a poll taken
recently. The survey also'showed
that declining sales of best sellers
leap as soon as the book comes out
in the dollar edition.
For the purpose of stimulating a
more creative education and of giv-
ing the students an opportunity to
exchange their art work the block
printing class at the University of
California at Los Angeles is prepar-
ing a collection of block prints to
be put in book form.

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Don't Miss this All-Talking Screen Master
Piece Now Showing at the
RAE THEATRE
- The Unholy Night"

WITH ERNEST TORRENCE, DOROTHY SEBASTIAN, NATALIE
MOOREHEAD. DIRECTED BY LIONEL BARRYMORE FROM BEN
HECHTS "GREEN GHOST."
An Unusual and Gripping Mystery Story
Spec ial Sa-le
i*
MEN'S SUITS I
In Two Low-Prked Groups-
'$ 26. 5.0 $31.5'0
Formerly Priced Formerly Priced
ats ataw
$33.50 and $35 $37.50 and $40
i= Including:
HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX SUITS
Men! This is a splendid op!iortunity to get that NEW SUMMER SUIT
at a very important saving. CONLIN AND WETHERBEE quality is 3
dominant in every suit. This is your assurance of complete satisfaction. =
Conlin and Wet erbe
N Formerly Pried.at
Sh -ts2.00 an d °,2.50 15
;ws %71-05

(Tile Sri A# *-ft"f

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