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February 25, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-02-25

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THF MICHIGAN DAILY

TUSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1930

-___ r

Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, who
is spending the winter touring
,South Africa, has written to his
niece, Miss Anna L. Tomlinson,' of
Ann Arbor, disclosing the interest-
ing progress and activity of the Un-
iversity's big observatory located at
Bloemfontein, Orange Free State,
South Africa.
Bloemfontein, where Professors1
Rossiter, Jessup, and Donner of the
University faculty are making ob-
servations in the Southern Hemi-
sphere, is referred to by Mr. True-
blood as the Ann Arbor of the Free
State.
Resembles Ann Arbor.
It has several boy's and girl's
schools and Grey university.
2300 double stars have been dis-
covered and recorded by the Uni-
versity professors since the setting
up of the telescope three years ago.
The telescope is the largest and best
equipped in the Southern Hehi-
sphere, having a 43 foot tube and
lens of 27 inches. The dome is turn-
ed, by motor and the slit in the top
is opened the same way. The tele-'
scope is kept moving with the
Earth's revolution to keep it fixed
when put, and to "stay put."
Harvard Observatory Near.
Mr. Trueblood further writes that
Harvard has an observatory near
Bloemfontein but is only used for
photographic work. "I am much im-
pressed with the men who are
working here," writes Mr. True-
blood. "I looked at a star last night,
a double star just discovered, that
is 6,000 light years distant, an
amazing, unthinkable distance."
The observations of the Univer-
sity men are confined to one quar-
ter of the heavens. A Dutch ob-
servatory located at Johannesburg
has another quarter, while the other
parts of the heavens of this hemi-
sphere are observed by the Univer-
sity men in South America, at La
Plata university, an observatory es-
tablished several years ago by Pro-
fessor Hussey of Michigan. The
two observatories in South Africa
report discoveries to each other
every week. "They are mapping the.
heavens, perhaps charting would be
a better word," writes Mr. True-
blood.
Observe in Turns.
The systemized manner of ob-
servations is interesting with Pro-
fessor Rossiter observing from dark
until 1 o'clock, and Professor Jes-
sup from 1 o'clock until daylight.
The observatory was provided by
Secretary Lamont, of President
'MIoover's cabinet, a graduate of
Michigan and a friend of liafessor
Hussey, who located it at Bloem-
fontein.
"This is a fascinating part of the
country, the first time we have been
away from the mountains," writes
Mr. Trueblood. "The altitude is 4,-
600 feet, the air is cool and brac-
ing. The views across the Veldt
from Naval Hill are far-reaching."
Commercial Pictures
Will be Shown Today
The fourth of a series of indus-
trial movies sponsored by the
School of Business Administration
will be given this afternoon at 4:05
o'clock in the Natural Science audi-
torium. There will be no admis-
sion charge.
Detroit Theatres I
CASS THEATER
Eve. $1 to $3
Pop. Mats Wed.Sat. $1 to $2
Greatest of Dance and Tune Shows
Schwab & Mandel Bring You
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Associated Press Photo
Dr. Harry Woodburn Chase, for-
mer president of the University of
North Carolina, is the new presi-
dent of the University of Illinois.'
Adelphi Will Hold
Smoker Wednesday
Because of the conflict with the
basketball game, the all-campus
smoker sponsored by the Adelphi
House of Representatives, originally
announced for tonight, has been
postponed to tomorrow. The meet-
ing, to which all who are interest-
ed in forensics are invited, will be
held at 7:30 o'clock in the Adelphi,
room on the fourth floor of An-
gell hall.
Prof. -Arthur W. Bromage, of the
political science department, will
be the principal speaker of the eve-
ning. His talk will be followed by'
an 'open discussion. In the closed
session, several tryout speeches will
be heard by the House.
All men students on the campus
are eligible for membership in
Adelphi, a special invitation being
extended to freshmen and students
entering the university for the sec-
ond semester. A short tryout
speech, on any topic, is required of
all applicants.
Ordinary alley cats are consider-
ably more intelligent than the
pampered household kind in the
opinion of C. J. Warden professor
in Columbia university. The pro-
fessor bases his opinion upon tests,
and plans a new laboratory at Co-
lumbia which will be devoted to
the study of cat, dog, rat, bird,
monkey, and racoon psychology.

JORCA DICSSES
Small Democracies Traced Back
to Era of Roman Empire
by Roumanian.
FLOURISH IN BALKANS
"Democracy is not a recent out-
growth in southeastern Efrope,
but dates back to the days of Rome
when small peasant communities!
lived their own local life under the
protection of an em'pire," stated
Dr. Nicholas Iorga, presid'ent of
the Universtiy of Bucharest, who
spbke yesterday afternoon on "Pea-
sant Democracies in Southeastern
Europe." Dr. Iorga, who is known
as the outstanding European his-1
torians ndw living, was brought toI
Ann Arbor under the auspices of
the history department as a Uni-
versity lecturer.
According. to Dr. Iorga, democra-
cy, as we understand it, has been
a thread running through the
whdle course of Roumanian history.
He pointed out that under Byzan-
tine, and even under Ottoman
Turkish rule, the same type of local
peasant democracy, led by the vil-
lage elders rather than dominated.
by alien officials, persisted. As an
example of this unusual condition,
the Eu'opean historians declared
that the Turk was content to levy
tribute from his Christian sub-
jects while perrpitting 'then to ap-
portion the tribute among them-
selves. Roumania, Dr. Iorga's
fatherland, was mentidned as most
fortunate in developing ┬░democracy,
for there the ruling princes paid
tribute to the Turkish sultan, but
in all other matters ruled as if
independent of foreign control.
In concluding, Dr.Iorga gave an
account of the steps by which each
of the Balkan states has freed it-
self from tributary dependence on
the Turkish government, and em-
erged as a self-governing peasant
commonwealth. "Roumania," stat-
ed Dr. Iorga, "is becoming increas-
ingly democratic in social and eco
nomic as well as in political struc-
ture."
Detroit Alun m iGroup
Plas to Honor Farrell
Featuring a testimonial to Steve
Farrell, veteran Michigan track
coach, on the occasion of his re-
tirement, the University of Michi-
gan Club of Detroit is formulating
the plans for its annual coaches
dinner to be given April 9.

TECHNIC TRYOUTS
ftHAVEMEETING
Editor to Give Talk on Policy
of ,M;agaifr Wedtiesday
Eveftig.
MERiT SYSTEM IS USED,
Second semester freshmen and
sophomores Who Wish to tryout for
the Technic, student 'engineering
publication, are requested to meet
!with the staff at 8 o'clock Wednes-,
day evening in the Technic offices'
in East Enkineering biulding.
L. Verne Ansel, '81E, editor, will
speak before the tryouts on the
policy of the inagazine, and oppor-
tunities open- to new staff memibers
will be outlined.
The advancement system used
on the Technic is based on merit.
Positions are open to tryouts on
both the editorial and business
staffs.
The Technic Was first published
on the cainpus in 1882, and since
then has traii'ed many engineer-
inxg students for editorial and busi-
ness positions.
There is enough salt in Utah to
supply 'the entie world for more
than 500 years.

Sunday's balmy spring weather

drew a crowd of over 150 visitors to center of attraction, using their
the University Museums building, double den to great advantage in
according to figures compiled by displaying their capabilities. Even
Superintendent Williams yesterday. the coyote, who has shown his face
evolution Hall, on the second floor but seldom all winter long, appear-
of the building, Washtenaw wing, ed for a short time.
dreW the largest number of regis- The addition of the new green-
tratlons, ninety-three namesbeing bronze weather vane last Saturday
recorded .in the guest book duringbrnewahrvelstSudy
the day. afternoon puts the finishing touch-
Among the farthest distant visit- es on the new animal house. De-
ing guests registered in the Mue- signed by Carleton Angell, museum
ums' day books were three parties artist and sculptor, the vane repre-

mythology, and was cast from the
original drawing which was finish-
ed just before Christmas vacation.
Directly beneath the figure of the
horse are the four wind directions,
also done in green-bronze.
Black swans are disappearing
fromt the rimers 6f western Aus-
tralia so fast that there are fears
that this interesting species may
becohe extinct.

. -

from California, one from Mexico,
and two from New York state. The
name "Alonzo Ic Huerta, Ti Jiani,
Mexico," however, was the most dis-
tant registration.
Great interest was shown Sunday
in the new animal house, whose oc-
cupants, attracted by the warmth
of the day and the large number of
visitors, paraded in their best man-

14

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STARTING
TODAYWUERTH

Shows at
2:00-3:30
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University Zoo Inhabitants Perform in Fine Manner ag Spring
Weather Attracts Large Number of Sunday Visitors to Museum

SALLY O'NEIL-JOHN MACK BROWN

YCVJT1
tazAes { ; h
fin eCta?4C
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