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May 17, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-17

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4

SATURDAY, MAY 17, 1930
Alexand.e
Will Ope]
WILL PROVIDE NEW
SERVICEFOR CITY
Routes to be in Communication
With Almost Every City
in the Country.
EXPRESS TO BE CARMUED
Passenger Station for New Air,
Route to be Situated at
Ann Arbor Airport.

T. MI CHIQ;AN DA II Y.

PAGE'

Er Simpson
n Campaign

Air passenger service directly
from Ann Arbor to points east and
west will be inaugurated Monday Y
by the Thompson Aeronautical cor-
poration, operators of airways n
Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, and Indi- Associatec Press Photo
ana. The Ann Arbor airport willi Alexander Simpson,
be used as a passenger station. Of New Jersey, who is a Demo-
Announcement of this serevice cratic candidate for United States
which was made possible by an ex- senator New Jersey.
tension of passenger lines from-.
ChicagoI-to. Kalamazoo was made
yesterday by Charles A. Rhein-
strom, of Detroit, general traffic
manager. Tickets for this new
service have been placed at the lo-
cal branch of the Detroit Motor KNIGHT ___
club on East Liberty street. I
To Use Stinson Planes. I h Ch of Central Ohio
In issuing the statement of
change in policy, Rheinstrom stated Will Raise History Fund
that the United States air-mail in Ten-Year Drive.
service has been operating in Ann i
Arbor with great success and that Endowment of the George W.
the addition of passenger service, Knight Fellowship in American
which was made possible by the History is the project of the Uni-
Waters airmail bill which President!versity of Michigan club of Central
Hoover recently signed, was an in- Ohio in the Alumni Ten-Year pro-
dication of the faith in Michigan io nteAun e-erpo
air patronage. tI gram, according to an article in
ir ptronae. be~ current issue of the Alumnus.
The type of plane which will bet fun iiss toeAlumnust
used in Ann Arbor is the Stinson-,The fund which is to amount to
Detroiter monoplane of the cabin1 $15,000 will be raised between the
variety. Powered with WrightI present year and 1937, the close of
Whirlwind motors, which have been the program. Many checks have al-
especially adapted for passenger ready been received by the Univer-
traffic, the Thompson lines are as sity from members of the, alumni
well . equipped as any transportI in and around Columbus.
company in the United States. Not Funds for the fellowship which
only passenger service has been is being given in honor of Dr.
added to the regular flying sched- George Wells Knight, 78, A.M. '83
ule through Ann Arbor, however, Ph.D. '84, professor of history at
for express. will also be carried by Ohio State university, are being
the new additions to the Thomp- raised under the direction of
Con v ent Schedule Planned. Charles E. Blanchard, chairman of
Students planning to leave in the the campaign committee.
early part of June via airlines will Dr. Knight who was born in
be in direct communication with. Ann Arbor in 1858 at one time
any city in the country now onEserved a term as principal of the
transport lines by virtue of this new Lansing High school. In 1885 he
service. Fares to points in Michi- i began his career on the Ohio State
gan and neighboring states are as' faculty where he has taught Amer-
follows: to Detroit, $4; to Pontiac, ican history, and political science,
$5; to Jackson, $4; to Battle Creek, has been chairian of the Gradu-
$6; to Kalamazoo, $8; to South ate School for a time, and also was
Bend, $12; to Chicago, $16. Similar Dean of the College of Education.
rates are being offered from Chica- He has served. as managing editor
go, South Bend, and Kalamazoo to of the Ohio Archaeological and
Lansing, Flint, Saginaw, Bay City, Historical Quarterly and has been
Muskegon, Grand Rapids, and many a member of numerous commis-
other Michiganrcities. sions and scientific societies.
Schedules for the new transpor-___________________
tation east and west include pas-
senger planes daily except Sunday M
which will leave the Chicago air-
port at 9 o'clock in the morning,i
Ann Arbor time, in two sections,
making connections at Kalamazoo,
and arriving here at noon for
points east. Return to the Ann Ar-
bor airport will be scheduled for
5:05 o'clock at night each evening
for Kalamazoo and points west. Rail
and water connections have been
figured in compiling the new sched-
ules and students wishing to make
trains leaving Chicago for points
south and farther west will find
ample time via the new air route.

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COMMITTEE *SESi
~E AINCOUS
Committee From Schoolmasters'
Club Desires Methods
of Instruction.
NEW UNITS FORMULATED I
Combining reports of numerous
high schools in the Midwest, a com-
mittee of the Classical conference
of the Michigan Schoolmasters'
club interested in Latin study re-
cently suggested to Michigan sec-
ondary schools a course of study
that assimilated the best quantita-
tive uniform methods of the junior-
senior high school.
After presenting a preliminary
report last year for criticism and
suggestion of the proposed course
of study that was to eliminate pre-
valent diversity in the secondary
teaching of the subject, the com-
mittee made its final report. Dr.
Albert H. Crittenden of the Uni-
versity Latin department was chair-
man of the state committee that
also included Prof. B. L. D'Ooge of
the Ypsilanti State Narmol school
and Miss Irma Anschultz ~of the
Bay City Junior college.
Charged with the responsibility
of formulating definitions of the
units of Latin which should be in-
cluded in the junior-senior school
curriculum, the committee was con-
fronted with such queries as when
the subject should be begun, how
the units of credit shall be adjust-
ed to facilitate the transfer of stu-
dents from one school to another,
what the value of short prelimin-
ary language courses is, and how
the work should be efficiently ap-
portioned among the successive
years of the course.
The committee, while recogniz-
ing the fact that most schools be-
gin the teaching of Latin in the
ninth grade and that consequently
there is a reason for the prevalent
practice, suggested that the begin-
ning of the Latin course be in the i
second semester of the eighth grade
to relieve the congestion of first
year high school work, to afford an
easier graduation of work, and to
give sufficient time for the enrich-
ment of the course by the intro-
duction of collateral and back-
ground material.
STUDENTS STAGE STRIKt.
LINCOLN MEMORIAL UNIVER-
SITY-Almost half of the the stu-
dents of Lincoln Memorial Univer-
sity remained on strike today,
spending their leisure in shops,
dormitories, and college gathering
places.j
The students walked out when
four members of the faculty were
discharged without a reason and
were requested to leave the campus
by May 30.

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W. H. Beuttner, preparateur of.
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Excellent bones of a mastodon
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WOMEN BLAMED FOR DRINKING
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In his testimony before the House
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