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May 10, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-10

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SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1930

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

4.

Ns

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PLANS BEING COMPLETED FOR LANTERN
NIGHT; DOOTHY M TOUFF'30, GENERAL
CHAIRMAN, APPOINTS COMMITTEE AIDS

Traditional Ceremonies Will be
Observed on Palmer Field the
Night of May 27.
SENIORS TO BE GOWNED
Freshman Pageant to be Staged
Followed by Serpentine
March of Classes..
Plans for Lantern Night, which is
to be May 2, have been started by
the central committee which had
its first meeting yesterday. Dorothy
Touff, '30, as president of the
Women's Athletic Association, which
sponsors the event, is general chair-
man. Elizabeth Louden, '32, is ac-
ting in the capacity of secretary-
treasurer.
Other members of the committee
are Eleanor Cooke, '31, president-
elect of the Women's League; Helen
DeWitt, '33, general chairman of
the Freshman Pageant; Albertina
Maslen, '31, who is in charge of
procession properties; D o r o t h y
."Sample, '32, chairman of field dec-
oration; chaiman of music, Fran-
ces Sackett, '30.
Jean Levy, '32, is chairman of
publicity; Janet Michael, '31, chair-
man of lunches; Lucille Lough,
'32, charmano patrons and pa-
tronesses; and Helen Domine, '31,
chairman of programs.
Tradition of Michigan Women.
Lantern Night is considered one
of the most beautiful traditions of
Michigan women, for at this time,
by means of a symbolic ceremony,
the sophomores bcome juniors, the
juniorspass 'to the dignity of sen-
rrs and the seniors go safely into
'$thewd e, wide, °wVorld."
The ceremonies begin when the
women :start gathering, at Palmer
field about §:30 o'clock, at which
time a picnic box lunch is served.
Immediately following this, the
Freshman Pageant is presented by
the first year women. By this time
the sun has set, and all the women
form in classes under the direction
of leaders and aides, chosen from
each class.
The seniors, in cap and gown,
carry lighted lanterns, while the
juniors carry hoops, through which
the sophomores will eventually pass.
After a serpentine march to Palmer
field, the seniors pass their lanterns
to the juniors, and the sophomores
receive the hoops of the juniors. A
block 'M" is formed, outlined by
the lanterns, and the ceremonies
end with the singing of the "Yel-
low and Blue."
Board of Directors
Meeting to be Held
At 10 o'clock this morning there
will be a meeting of the old and
new members of the Board of Di-
rectors of the Women's League in
the Directors' room of the League
building. Plans will be completed
for the installation banquet to be
held next Wednesday, May 14,
which every woman on campus is
requested to attend.
The method of procedure for the
installation service will be discus-
sed, and the new Board members
will be acquainted with the duties
of each office.

BASEBALL SCHEDULE
Monday at 4
Zeta Tau Alpha vs. Pi Beta
Phi.
Chi Omega vs. Kappa Kappa
Gamma.
Alpha Phi vs. Alpha Xi Delta.
Delta Gamma vs. Alpha Gam-
ma Delta.
Monday at 5
1rKappa Delta vs. Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
A Helen Newberry vs. Theta Phi
Alpha.
BANO VET TICKETS
PLCDON SA1L
Installation of League Officers
to Take Place at Banquet
Wednesday, May 14.
MISS LLOYD WILL SPEAK
Tickets for the installation ban-
quet of the Women's League to be
held Wednesday, May 14, at 6 o'-
clock in the League ballroom are
now on sale in the lobby of the
League building. To this gather-
ing, the second open meeting of the
League this year, it is customary for
dormitories, League houses, and so-
rorities to come in a body, and a
large attendance is expected.
In addition to the installation
services for the new League Board
of Directors, the program will in-
clude a short talk by Miss Alice
C. Lloyd, advisor of women, Her-
mine Soukup, '31, resigning treas-
urer of the Women's League, will
read the treasurer's report for this
year, and Margaret Bush, '31, will
turn over her office of president of
the League to Eleanor Cooke, '31.
This ceremony will be followed by
a short speech of acceptance by
Miss Cooke.
NEW ACTIVITIES
UNDERTAKEN BY
ATHENA SOCIETY
Arrangements for various activi-
ties to be carried out in the near
future were made in the last meet-
ing of Athena, honorary women's
debating club. A bridge party,
which will be opened to all women,
has been planned for May 17, at
the League building. The chair-
man of plans for this party is Mad-
elon Andrus, '31.
A freshman Athena-Zeta Phi Eta
debate on some important campus
questions will take place at the
League May 13, in the fourth floor
club room. Olympia LaMarca, '31,
has charge of the debate arrange-
ments. The exact subject will be
announced later.
Donna McCaughna, '31, will rep-
resent Athena on the committee
of arrangements for the second se-
mester party to be given by the
combined, group of Athena, Zeta
Phi Eta, Adelphi, and Alpha Nu.
This party will be in culmination of
the year's work and is a regular
semi-annual affair.

WOMAN SELECTED
MANAGING EDITOR
I
Adriana Orlebeke.
Recently appointed managing
editor of the Cardinal, University
of Wisconsin student daily, is the
first woman to hold this post. Miss'
Orlebeke is only 19 years old.
University Writer Gives!

Les Miserables' Is Subject
Literary Program Planned
for Sunday.

PROFESSOR N LSON
WILL GIVE READING '

of

TO TELL AUTHOR'S AIMS
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
will be the subject of Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson's reading to be
given Sunday afternoon, May 11, at
the League building. For those in-
terested in the novel, this program
ought to be particularly valuable,
as Professor Nelson will discuss it
from many standpoints, emphasiz-
ing especially the unity and har-
mony of the book.
By bringing out the author's un-
derlying idea, he will try to explain'
why Hugo placed in his novel ac-I
counts of the convents of Paris, itsl
sewers, and other things that may
not seem altogether necessary to
some. The book also will be discuss-
ed from the thought of its being a}
social thesis, dealing as it does so
minutely with the life in France
at the end of the eiahteenth yen-

TRADITIONAL FETES MAKE OXFORD
UNDERGRADUATE LIFE INTERESTING
Mrs. Leonard Manyon, graduate tower at dawn. The tower would '
of Oxford who is now residing in sway when the chimes were rung
Ann Arbor, describes the "city of to hail the rising sun; after that
towers and spires" as a magic city we went into the meadows to pickI
where life is delightful and gay. the purple Oxfordshire flower, then
Mrs. Manyon graduated from the for a gigantic breakfast at an inn,"
last of the five women's colleges to she continued.
be founded and stated that at Ox- "At Oxford one had a room of!
ford the college replaces the Amer- one's own, though we nearly froze'
ican sorority as far as social, mat- to death during the winter. The
ters are concerned. women lived rather a bachelor's
"Every afternoon was a holiday," life, as the social life was not par-
stated Mrs. Manyon, while describ- ticularly a busy one, the big event l
ing life at Oxford, "but we worked being the boat races that came the
hard as well as played hard, there- second week in May.
by striking the half-way mark that "One of the traditional spots near
makes life interesting. On these aft- Oxford was a place called Binsey
ernoons we used to play the games where a spout of clear water spark-
that are so popular among English led out once long ago, when 'St.
women, or take a boat ride on the Frideswide, the abbess, prayed for
nearby river. Sometimes we would rain in time of drought. If one
walk in the hills that surround Ox- throws a pin into the well andI
ford. It was pleasant to lie on the makes a wish, the wish supposedly
grass and look down on that 'sweet comes true," concluded Mrs. Man-
city with the dreamy towers.' The yon.
enchanted names of the places
about, Bablock, Hythe, Hinksey, The Swan club at Ohio State uni-
and Goodstowe with its ruined versity will present a pageant this
haunted abbey and charming inn, week in the natatorium. Dances,
are prominent in our memories. water drills, pyramids, unusual div-
"There were certain old customs ing, clever costumes, and swim-
which we observed. On May morn- ming to music are features of the
ing we would go down to Magdalen program.

NOTICE.
Since the Freshman Pageant
is less than four weeks off, it
has been requested that every
. freshman woman who is par-
ticipating in the dances, should
report regularly for group re-
hearsals. Miss Sylvia Adams, ad-
* visor, will answer any questions
concerning the time and the
place of practices.

t4
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\.
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Information on Dieting tury tlliI tIlll 11111111111111111111111111111111 liii lIii 1 ,1
The hour will include areading -
Those who cling to the vain hope of some of the more dramatic
of losing weight by diet and exer- scenes from 'Les Miserables.' Tea =
cise may read the following report will be served at the end of the pro- =
of Mrs. Catherine Blunt, of the Uni- gram.
versity of Chicago:_ _ _
"College girls today are taller OHIO WESLEYAN-Female ty-
and larger than their predecessors outs for the Wesleyan Transcript
of a generation ago," she says, "be- outnumber the male thirty nine to ,.
cause of a better diet, and more two. Of the 41 who are trying out
outdoor exercise." for positions 35 are trying out for-
Miss Blunt compiled her informa- the news staff, 4 for society, and=
tion from statistics at Smith, Vas- only two for sports. Tryoutwill
sar and Stanford. extend over a two weeks period. O h DW
()c oc ~ occ~ac (X;;;o < ©a o- -On the Dot With
. REMEMBER MOTHERS' DAY Fashion
0 . Remember Mother * GIVE HOSIERY
- + Tinty clots... medium size
II WITH LIGGETT'S ART-STYLE Service Chiffon Medium r d*t . . ande a rge
1-_ SrieC if n°M du Service IG T ' R -T L dots .'.dots ar a crisp new
HICH GRADE CHOCOLATES f$1.19 pair $1.35 pair 1 faionwith contagious ef-
Extra Heavy Service .1. -$ .
See these beautiful packages. A wonderful assortment of Outsize $12.50-$16.50
Fruits and Nuts. Hand Dipped in delicious chocolate ........i.
coating. $1.95 pa
al 'Three sizes. One. Two and Five Pounds.^E
We pack to mail free of charge. 13
Edsill's Rexall Drug Store 1-
208 South Main Street-Next to Kresge's -
221 SOUTH MAN
. o o ~o~" " o t -rt"""""""""""""1II1i111L1"11""11U"1H i"""""" """""" ""IIIu"" 1111111I mmmm m mm{11lIIl112

1I

SMART
HATS,
for
Mothers' Day Tomorrow
Mother will want to look her best tomorrow and
we can suggest a new hat from our shop. A large
variety to select from-all head sizes and all the
best shades.

I
i
i
i
I
I
;
I

N4
-~M
.r. .t I ~. t/v ^ .,°, . + s .w ..,..2

or thi
Sport Silks
Shantung and heavy crepe dre
suits..
ar $19.75
Blouses
" * Crisp blouses of linen, dotte
® batiste or voile.
S$1.95
"Deauville san
*eelkskin golf<
$

days

of

real

Linens
Plain and printed linens . . . sleeveless
and caned styles.
$3.95-$5.95
Knitted Suits
Two and three piece styles . . . boucle
and plain weaves.
$14.75

Sleeveless b
plain andc

sport" j
Cottons
broadcloths and piques
printed.
$3.95-$5.95 ..<}
Sweaters
cle and plain weaves
nd chukker shirts.
$2.95 up
ad Angora

Lacey, bou
slin-overs a

port Shoes
dals four eyelets ties and
oxfords.
7.50-$8.50

Berets
French wool felt, jersey an
. . . short colors.
$1.50-$2.98

I

I

Ask for a"blue." tmaor.of Ann Arbor.in our DrugsJenartn n

r

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