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May 02, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-05-02

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PAQtTOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1930

w....,._I TC T A D I YFRDYMY2,13

r

54t £i1t~ian IaUnf
Published every morning except Mondayi
during tne University year by th. Board in
Coutol of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conferences Edtoda
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
r tches credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as. second class matter. Special rate
cf postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.0e; by mall,
$4.30.
AOdces: Ann Arbor Press Building. May'
bard Street.
.Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, a2ur4.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editorial Chairman....... ...George C. Tilledy
City Editor...............Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor...............Donald J. Kline
Sports Editor ....... EdwarA L. Warner, Jr,
Women's Editor...........Mariorie Follmer'
Telegraph Editor. ,.......Cassam A. Wilson
Music and Drama.......W.William J. Gorman
Literary Editor.........Lawrence R. Kein
Assistant City Editor.... Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors-Editorial Board Members
Frank E. Cooper H-enry J. Merry
William C. Gentry Robert L. Slos
Charles R. Kauffman Walter W. Wilds
Gurney Williams
Reporters
Morris Alexander. Bruce . Manley
Bertram Askwith Lester May
Helen Barc Margaret Mix
Maxwell Bauer David M. Nichol
Mary L. Behymer William Page
Allan H. Berkman Howard H. Peckham
Arthur J. Bernstein Iugh Pierce-
S. Beach Conger Victor Rabinowits
.Bec Cogr John D. Rbende
asM Cooley eannie Roberts
Helen Domine Joseph A. Russell
Margaret Eckels Joseph Ruwitch
Catherine Ferrin Ralph R. Sachs
Carl F. Forsythe Cecelia Shriver
Shtldon C. Fullerton Charles R. Sprowi
Ruth Gallmeyer Asit Stewart
Ruth Geddes S. Cadwell Swansod
Ginevra Ginn Jane Thayer"
Jack Goldsmith MargaretyThompson
Emily Grimes Richard L. Tobin
Morris Cvemsn Robert Townsend
Margaret Harris Elizabeth Valentine
j Culen Kennedy Harold 0. Warren, Jr.
an Levy G, Lionel Widen .
ussell .McCracken Barbara Wright
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zitrif

indifference toward it as exempli-
fied in the Harding and' Coolidge
administrations, but the people
are demanding their right to test
prohibition at the ballot box.
This gift from the Gods is fall-
ing, willy nilly, into the Democratic
lap. The national party, stodgily
petrified at the thought of offend-
ing the wet-drinking, dry-votingl
South, has refused to capitalize on
the vital wet-dry question mark1
that now stands before the voters.
Despite President Wilson's veto of
the Volstead Act and NomineeI
Smith's frank advocacy of local
liquor options, national Democracy
with characteristic ineptness re-
mains silent on the issue of the
day. Independently, however, in
local contests all over the nation,1
wet Democrats are taking the field
against Republicans whose hands
are tied on the prohibition issue
by the dryness of the Hoover ad-
ministration. Massachusetts, Mary-
land, Pennsylvania, Illinois, and
most recently, Michigan, are a few
of the states in which these con-
tests will bear watching with re-
spect to their influence, not only
on Hoover's Congressional majori-
ties but also on the 1932 presiden-
tial election.
Democratic Senator Wheeler
from Montana, frankly looking forl
an issue on which to make a presi-
dent out of Franklin D. Rooseveltl
in 1932, hit upon governmental su-
pervision of ."public power utilities.
It is our guess that when the
smoke of battle has cleared away
next fall, prohibition will be found
to have emerged as the winning
Democratic issue.

.wr
II ' lJ It ' ' "
t[D UL
HOW TQ
WRITE A
COLUMN.

n . - (1

KI

Music And Drama

-V
i:

For the benefit of those who may4
wish to try out for the editorship'
of this column I think I'll start
off this morning with a brief dis-
course on the method of writing
Rolls, just to show how easy it
really is.
DIARY OF ROLLS EDITOR.
2:00 p.m.-Enters Press building
and goes through sheaf of mail ly-
ing on counter. (Mail is lying on
counter, not the editor). Finds
three letters addressed to Rolls.
First contains free tickets to a
show, second announces gigantic
shoe sale on State street, and the
third contains a perfectly horrible
poem by The Chink.
2:05 - Sandbags the business
manager, news editor and four re-
porters in effort to find five sheets
of copy paper. Places first sheet
in typewriter and settles back to
peruse The Daily for ideas. Finds
two news items, three peculiar
headlines, two funny typographical
errors and a classified ad that de-
serve coniment. Writes first page
of copy and removes it from ma-
chine. Finds page entirely blank.
Takes The Daily, copy paper and
letters to another desk whose type-
writer is equipped with ribbon.
Beats five reporters to pulp and
gains possession of typewriter.
2:30 --Writes first page over
again. Writes second page. Writes
third page. Somebody rushes up
with copy of Daily and points out
funny typo. Editor tells him he
has seen it. Writes two lines.1
Somebody else rushes out and-

CERCIE FRANCAIS.
Review by Prof. W. A. McLoughlin.
Indubitable success crowned the
efforts of the Cercle Francais last
evening.
Mystere d'Adam was produced
with meticulous care. A spirit of
reverence characterized the entire j
performance, and the actors seem-
ed imbued ,with the simplicity and
dignity that may well have mark-
ed the first representation centur-
ies ago. The setting, costumes, and
posture of the actors possessed the
vividness, the naive sincerity and
directness, in short, the indefinable
charm of a "primitif." The diffi-
cult role of the Deity was ably in-
terpreted by Richard Humphreys,
who brought out the tempered ma-
jesty of the Eternal Law Giver and
the kindly care of the Creator, as
well as the wrath of the injured
Godhead. George Meader, as Adam,
was especially fine in his rejection
of Satan's tempting, his acquies-
cense to the behests of Eve, his up-1
braiding of her, and his abject la-
mentations. Eve found in Miss S.
Burnette Bradley a most artistic
interpreter: voice, diction, gesture
all producing a superb tffect. Sa-
tan was very well played by John
O'Neill. Impressive indeed was the
chanting of the appropriate Latin
liturgical texts off stage by a well-
trained group of male voices. As
Professor Chamard remarked, "all
the actors seem to have caught the
naive and deep religious feeling of
the medieval mind."
A leap of some five centuries
brings up to the Precieuses Ridi-
cules of Moliere, performed with all
the boisterous absurdity it de-
mands. The same care was evident
here: costumes, splendid and cor-
rect from gloves and plumes to
fans,-likewise good acting and
thoughtful interpretation. Mas-
carille was admirably done by John
Spicer, with the proper mixture of
vulgarity with lofty manners, dis-
tinguished airs and fashionable
foibles, both literary and sartor-
ial, while James O'Neill, as Jodelet,
ably seconded him in his fruittful
efforts to impress the two country
girls Who have come to Paris. Miss
Mary Morley and Miss Dorothy
Beck played with no little charm
the rules respectively of Magdelon
and Cathos, the simpering coquet-
tes whose heads have been turned
by too much novel reading. Rich-
ard Humphreys showed his versa-
tility in the role of the irate father
Gorgibus, in the interpretation of
s which he distinguished himself.

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FO
FOR

-i

I

MOTHERS' DAY
A BOX OF OUR CANDY
PREKETES
SUGAR BOWL
109 S. Main Dial 2.1414
FOR
MOTHERS' DAY
MAY, 11th.
Give your mother a box of
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token of your love for her,
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D B Shoe Store
620 EAST LIBERTY

II

Tennis Shoes, 99c, $1.89, $2.79

SENIOR STAGS.

_ __ _ _
To grow bette r
YEGETAB-LE S"
Use this compilete plant fod

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising ...........T. IHollister iiabley
Advertising.............Kasper I. Halverson
Service...................George A. Spater
Circulation ........... ... .J. Vernor Davis
Accounts............:......... John R. Rose
Publications...--......GeorgeR. Hamilton
Business Secretary-Mary Chase
Assistants
James E. Cartwright Thomas Muir
Robert Crawford George R. Patterson
Thomas M. Davis Charles Sanford
Norman Eliezer Lee Slayton
Norris Johnson Joseph Van Riper
Charles Kline Robert Williamson
Marvin Kobacker William R. Worboy
Women Assistants on the Business
Staff.
Marian Atran NMary Jane Kenan
Dorothy Blootngarden Virginia McComb
Laura Codli'ng Alice McCully
Ethel Constar Sylvia Miller,
Josephine Convisscr Ann Verner
ernice Glaser Dorotliaa Waterman
Anna Goldberger Joan Wiese
Hortense Gooding
FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1930
Night Editor, CHAS. R. KAUFMAN

Although men ought at all times
cheerfully to talk together, . yet
ought they chiefly so to do when

they assemble and meet together points out same typo. Editor says
over the banquet table, to cele- he has already seen it. Writes one
brate in laughter and song an line. Somebody rushes up and
achievement of which they all are points out funny typo. Editor
proud. laughs hollowly and says he has
The occasion of the Senior Stag seen it for Pete's sake, in a nice
banquet, which is to be celebrated way.
Tuesday, May 13, appears to be
notably a time fit for Seniors to
meet in the intimacy of masculine
friendship. Occurring a few hoursR
after the traditional Swingout
ceremonies, when members of the
graduating classes can be expected!
to be in that mellow frame of mindf
which is induced by thoughts of
concluding a college career andj
facing the more mature responsi-
bilities of life in the world, tl e 3:00 - Finishes column, which
Senior Stag banquet should offer isn't so good in spots.) Puts copy
unrivaled opportunities of cement- in copy basket and finds five per-,
ing into life-long friendships form- fectly good contributions tacked
ed at the University. on bulletin board. Rewrites two
For long years, Senior women pages of his copy and again places
have had a traditional breakfast, it in basket. Breathes happy sigh.
which for women has come to take Book Editor approaches and says
a place of almost unprecedented he wants the column for tomorrow.
importance in the field of class Two senior staff members andthe
ceremonies. janitor with a broom restore order.
It is indeed time that men, who
inherently exhibit more pronounc- Simple, isn't it? Silly, in fact.
ed proclivities toward convivial B m
activities than do women, should But let's have those sample col-
be given a means of celebrating to- umns-the appointment of a new
ther their graduation from the Rolls editor will be made some time
U iversity. next week, probably.

Siqater Sushin
1 y
Greeting Cards
mean Friendship-
and Friendship means
sunshine in life.
We have a splendid
assortment of new
Greeting Cards-sui-
table for every oc.
casion.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State Street
The Stationery and Typewriter Store

F EED your vegetables!
You will get larger, bet-
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get :them sooner, if you
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The method is simple.
Just three steps. Results will
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Vigoro comes in 100, 50
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everything you grow.

WET DEMOCRACY.

The national Democratic party,
almost in spite of itself, stems to

be
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tea
H
as,
an
ca
an
w
st
Je
d
ta:
th
ly
be
m
gr
th
lit
pr
fa
st
h
pu
w
kr
ca
wl
re
h
th
ti
Ti
ti
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pu
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headed for an astonishing re-
rth of vitality. Bruised and bat-
red beyond recognition by the
oover landslide in 1928, rent
sunder by sectionalism, intoler-
nce, and prohibition, sold out to
pitalism on its tariff issue, fin-

i

0----
TOO MUCH AMATEURISM.

ncially insolvent, and unable to It has been a long time since the'
in majorities even in its 'southern cry of too. much professionalism
rongholds, the party of Thomas has been heard, especially wheni
efferson was thought to be in its one harks back to the Iowa-Bigi
Bath throes. Republicans were Ten affair of last fall, when pro-
)rrespondingly jubilant; others " fessionalism was the most uase(*
lked of forming a new party. word. Here, however, we are not
Today-a year and a half later- using it in connection with college
ie picture has changed striking- athletics, but with an .important
. The Hoover administration, public service, the Ann Arbor fire
eginning its career with working department.
iajorities in both houses of Con- The attitude of the department
ress, has already lost control of has long been quite amateurish in
ae Senate through its lack of po- respect to its duties, with the na-
tical acumen. Its farm relief tural result that a not inconsider-
rogram has failed to satisfy the able amount of perfectly good Ann1
armers, and this issue, cleverly Arbor property has gone up in
olen from the Democrats in 1928, flames. Of course it is important
as been reopened for Democratic to finish that deciding rubber of
urposes. The stock market crash bridge or play off the last set in
ith resultant unemployment has the finals of the department ping-
nocked the wind out of Republi- pong tournament, but a burning;
an buglers. And the tariff, for house or automobile is, or at least
'hich Hoover advocated limited should be, more important con-
vision, has so sky-rocketed under cerns of the heroic fire fighters
igh-protectionist leadership that who are receiving regular salaries
he Democrats can again become from the city.
he low-tariff party without re- A case in point: A Chevrolet
ouncing their moderate protec- which Was going east on Hill street
dnism of 1928. struck the curb at East University
Add the promised post office and turned over, igniting almost
eandals to these holes in the Re- immediately: An alarm brought
ublican front, and enough ground- one of the chief's subalterns speed-j
ork seems to be laid for a cru- ing to the scene at the rate of
al off-year election, but the about 15 miles per hour. As he
'hole story has not yet been told. pulled up to the burning car with
he beery nose of prohibition is al- a screeching of brakes, the gaso-
D shining brightly on the election line tank of the stricken Chevro-
orizon. . let ignited. While attempting to
President Hoover, the conserva- stop the pyrotechnics, the fire-
ve, substantial, law-abiding can- man's chemical ran out. ShortlyI
idate. rode into the White House two more firemen arrived at the

LATEST CAMPAIGN.
Lark suggests that Rolls start a
campaign for comfort in men's
dress, and says we should appear
in shirtsleeves from now on until
the end of school. "A white shirt
never offends," is to be the slogan
of the new movement. All those.
in favor signify by the usual sign,
reponents no; the ayes have it.
Coatless Shirt week starts Monday.
* * * ,
DISAPPOINTMENT.
The Architects' May Party, which
I consider the best party on cam-
pus, has been indefinitely post-
poned and I'm disappointed. I had
been looking forward to that affair
with much glee and had just lined
up some of the boys for a- free
ticket . . . Such is life. The May
Party committee, by the way, ad-
vises all those who had planned to
attend to trade in their clown suits
for shot guns and go to the Mili-
tary Bal. tonight.
* * *
They tell me that "Ten Nights
in a Barroom" is worth seeing.
Which being the case I think I'll
take it in tonight. Perhaps I'll
even inflict a short review of it on
you tomorrow.
_/
Oh, boy!
I understand there isn't much of
a rush on the part of students to

- o
THE RIVALS.
A Review.
It is-disturbing to find shameless
exhibitionism genuinely amusing.
But it shouldn't be; it is a musical
comedy principle easily recogniz-
able. The George Tyler-Mrs.
Fiske doesn't let an authentic con-
ception of a rather well-known
play bother them. There is no
conception; merely scheming for
the most riotous exploitation of the
rather considerable, considerablyj
varied array of talent assembled.
The various well-known people in
the play - with the exception of
Rollo Peters who seemed to have
qualms of conscience and intelli-
gence and was thus authentic-
are obsessed with the idea of be-
ing in infectious high spirits. The
fact that they all achieve it in dif-
ferent ways makes the production
a medley of styles very like a good
comedy in the delirious fun it af-
fords.
James Powers. as Bob Acres, iso-
lates and caricatures a few odd and
amusing tricks in his technique,
and is rewarded with hearty laugh-
ter at his grotesqueness. Betty
Linley as Julia Melville gives an
intelligently satiric commentary on
the sentimental girl she portrays.
Pedro de Cordoba strives desper-
ately for genuineness of passion by
declaiming his lines operatically.
And so on-all in their own way.
Inevitably, of course, Mrs. Fiske
does her part her own way too.
She gets a successfully riotous ex-
cess in her comedy, certainly not
correct, but important and very
Sdroll.Her burlesque has vim and
a pleasantly sly mentality. Her
actual technique is violently man-
nered-her vice curiously inflexible,
her agitated, staccato movements
predictable after her first scene,
reading often aroitrary, and her
efforts to steal other people's
scenes a bit annoying. But she
compellingly underscores her pro-
jection with her witty personality

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114 SOUTH ASHLEY STREET
READ THE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS!

I

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