100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 30, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30 , 1930

T-'VMT('-4T r AM r1AT.I.

PAGE

F

p ...:. r.r.'. a -=aeie ' , "r"r+; --° 1 1 1.. L IYl A V l-a 1 41 t3 IN .x

CAMPUS SOCIETIES
AOD CONTRlIBUTION
TO fUND FOR CAMP'

01i CONVICTS DEMAND REMODVAL -OF WARDEN THOMAS I rf~i4SEATFDE S"RAFC
AFTE ISASTROUS ENTENTARY FIRE AT COLUMBUS [pCHAFBOK TAFC
fi M 't5 lf' L MCHKIGO CROWDS FILL STRI3E
1111,11,1111~L

v, ..
. , . .....:...... ... . ,.....: :.r
°+ . Sri' $ , ,. +..i . '3t .t} C f + t ? ut dY hV - r Y t l
. .
t

Of
PLAC

Air Drive Asks Assistance
Fraternities, Sororities,
Faculty, Merchants.

E

GOAD.

AT $3000

!"'Ii1 11 IHINER ;(By Asite~d Press~) Iwhom the animal belonged dild a lot
CHICAGO, April 29.-It was a of plain and fancy walking around,
horse on Clarkc St., no less, and sit- trying to figure a way to get the
Two Priests Thought Dead Af- ting down horse into a walking stance. From
ter Bandits Loot City of A performance of this kind, is the gathering crowd came frequent
Si oh sage suggestions, mostly fron per-
entaochen. most unusual in Chicago, especially sons whose only previous ac-
- 'on Clark St., and particularly in quaintance with horses had been in
DEATHS NOT CONFIRMED front of the county building on a dice games.
busy Monday afternoon.
(By Associated Press) I The horse's name probably was .
SHANGHAI, April 29.--Captured Maud, but this is purely guesswork. Record Vote Expected
by bandits who looted the pros7 She was called many names. Ex-in Republican Primary
! perienced horsemen were heard to
perous Hupeh province city of observe that she was the sittingest I(N Associatcd cPress)
Sientaochen, 50 miles from Han- nag they had ever seen. JUNEAU, Alaska, April 29.-A
kow, two American Catholic priests Crowds gathered and gaped, record vote drawn by a spirited
weereported by Chinese sources Hustling lawyers halted. Learned
wereryjurists ranged themselves among contest for the Republican nomina-
today to have been shot by their the bystanders. Ordinary people tion for delegates to congress was
captors ! stood on tiptoes, peering through expected in Alaska's primary elec-
The priests, believed to have been the crowds to see what they could tion today.
Fr. Francis Murray and Fr. Pat- see. Street cars were blocked. Au-
The contest briLasoberkfonte isio
k ngs backl c hrrainrq...~ he

Annual Camp Provides Outing
for Underprivileged Boys
of Detroit, Ann Arbor.
Checks received yesterday in-
creased the total amount received
from fraternity and sorority houses
in the annual drive for the Uni-
versity Fresh Air camp to more
than $400, it was announced last
night by Stanton W. Todd, '30, sen-
ior class president and director of
the Fresh Air drive.
The second letter to campus or-
ganizations asking thirty dollars
from each house in order to in-
sure the success of the drive was
sent out last Saturday. All organ-
izations who have not contributed
as yet are urged to do so as soon
as possible. The drive in addition
to this canvas of fraternities and
sororities will culminate with the
general appeal to the campus on
Wednesday,, May 7. Contributions
from merchants as well as from the
members of the faculty and alumni
are expected to swell the fund
above the $2,500 mark. The goal for
the student drive has been set for
$3,000, which covers the runningI
expenses of the camp.
Has Existed Eight Years.
Michigan is one of the few uni-I
versities in the country whose stu-
dent body supports a camp for un-
derprivileged boys. The camp which
is located on Lake Patterson, 261
miles northwest of Ann Arbor, pro;
vides more than 400 poor boys from
Detroit and Ann Arbor with the,
benefits of a two-week outing. Dur-
ing the eight years of its existence
the camp has given such a vacation
to more than 2,800 boys, who have
been selected by various civic and
welfare organizations.
Honor Men to Sell Tags.
"M" club men and members of
different campus honorary societies
will receive the contributions on
Tag Day. Many letters have been
received endorsing the work of the
Fresh Air camp as well as the ac-
tivity of the committee in its drive
for funds.
Literary College' Dean
Leaves for Convention I
Dean J. R. Effinger of the literary
college was to leave Ann Arbor to-
day for Vermillion, S. D., where he
is to attend a meeting of the as-
sociation of deans of liberal arts
colleges from Middle Western uni-
versities.
After the convention, Dean Ef-
finger will remain in Vermillion
through Saturday to represent the
University at the inauguration cer-
emonies for Herman G. James as
president of the University of South
Dakota, to be held on the Univer-
sity campus there.
He will return to Ann Arbor Sun-

Soon after the Ohio penitentia
have launched a campaign of passi
tality and demanding his removal.
be turned back from their dash for
committee is shown above, left to ri
van, Roy Steel, and Al Fair.
Marley States Church
Leads Peace Movement
Speaking on the subject "Patriot-
ism and Christianity," Reverend H.
P. Marley addressed a student aud-
lence at 4:15 yesterday in room 231
Angell Hall.
Reverend Marley pointed out that
patriotism should be rather con-
cerned with the improvement to the
country within itself than with its
resistance to enemies. He further
showed that true religion is incom-
patible with the idea of war.
In conclusion, Reverend Marley
stated that all countries are coming
more and more to see that war is a
thing that must be outlawed and
that the churches should be in the
lead of such a movement.
NEBRASKA STATE TEACHERS'
COLLEGE-Each year the collegel
newspaper is given over to a fresh-;
man edition, printed in green ink
and under the supervision of a
freshman staff. The object is to es-.
tablish a better spirit among fresh-

..., ..

rick Lasson, were from the mission
established by the St. Columbus!
Missionaries of Bellevue, Neb. Oth-I
ers of the mission were reported to
have escaped -the bandit attack.
The report is unconfirmed.f
Bandits who have been ravaging
northern Kiangsu province for sev-
eral days, torturing peasants, loot-
A4sociated Press> PcotQ n n unn terhms wp
try fire at Colnmbus that wiped out the lives of 320 prisnrs, nv ing and burning their homes, swept
ve resistance, accusing Warden Preston E. Thomas (inset) above of btu- into Kingsuchen posted machine
The convicts' "passive committee" demanded action yesterday only to guns and mowed down 1,000 help-
liberty by the bullets of many guards armed with automatic rifles. The less inhabitants.
ght: Ed Dcan, Charles Quinlin, Louis Wolfe, Murray Wolfe, Percy Sulli- One thousand others were carried
off with loot from the city. King-i
(suchen, which was burned by the
Dee tbandits before they departed, is
oany geswithin 100 miles of Nanking, cap-
. Annual Meeting of Scan diavian Society ital of the Nationalist government.
ILLINOIS TO HOLD MEETING.
j Meeting in Ann Arbor next Fri- the country, among them Yale, Chi- ..
day and Saturday, the Society for KThe Illinois Academy of Science 1
the dvanemen ofScaninavansago, Kansas, Texas, and Nebras- will meet at the Universitty of Illi-.j
the Advancement of Scandinavian ka. There will be two papers by i nois Friday and Saturday of this
Study will hold its annual conven- Michigan professors. "A Celtic week. The r eeting is expected to
tion at the Michigan Union. Analogue to a Ballad of Oehlen- attract a record number of scien-
The program calls for an ad- schlaeger" will be given by Prof. J. tists from all over the country, as it
dress of welcome by President R. Reinhard, and "Aspects of Hall- is being held in conjunction with the
Alexander G. Ruthven on Friday at strom's Impressionism," will be giv- quarter-centennial celebration of
2 o'clock, which is to be followed en by Prof. C. L. Dahlstrom. the Illinois State Geological survey.
by a number of papers on Scandi-
navian subjects. There will be an
informal dinner Friday night and
the presentation of more papers
Saturday morning.
All the meetings will be held at!
the Union and it is hoped that
many who are interested in these l
subjects will feel free to attend.
This also applies to the dinner Fri-
day night, tickets for which may be
obtained by calling Prof. F. W. Pet-
erson of the rhetoric department,
who is in charge of all the arrange-
ments'for the convention.
The delegates at the meeting will
represent a great many colleges of

o es n dwithuiu any ting
happening. The windows of ofltce political limelight Judge James
buildings were hung with human Wickersham, who held the dele-
heads. I gateship for 12 years, from 1908 to
All eyes centered on the seated 1920. He is opposed by Territorial
nag. It began to look as though Attorney General John Rustgard.
Sitting Bull was being challenged Wickersham's one-time chief lieu-
for a place in history by sitting i tenant and for the past ten years
he a strong ally of Delegate Dan Suth-
The express wagon driver to erland.
~~~ -
Mark To His Master's Voicel Saying
O UNIVERSITYMUSIC HOUSE
For Everything Musical

Lowest Prices:
TERMS
To Suit.
Play While
1,011Pay.

Radios:--
Majestic, Victor, Crosley
Piano:-
ldwin, Koler' & Campbn
Orchestral Instruments
Victor, Columbia, Brunswick
Records

s.. febrab 1i
I l Em TM )M

ASK THOMAS HINSHAW, Mgr.
601 East William Street Phone 7515

tlE

men

of the school.

3---

TH''' E

MICHIGAN BELL,
Telephone Home
Long Distance Rates

/

II

day.
C O L U M B I A UNIVERSITY -I
Eighty-six awards of fellowships'
and scholarships totalling $85,000
have been awarded by the Univer-
sity for the year 1930-1931. Forty-
two American colleges and univer-
sities are represented by the recip-
ients, in addition to nine foreign
colleges. Fifty-seven of the schol-
ars honored are men while the re-
maining 29 are women. Iowa has
the most representatives listed
among those honored, with New
York second and Pennsylvania
third.

are Surprisingly
Low

t
s
l

The represchtative rates listed below are for
day Star on-to-Station calls and are effective
between 4:30 a. m. and 7:00 p. m.
A Station-to-Station call is one made to a
telophone number rather than to a particular
person.
You may reverse the charges to your home
telephoh e if you wish.

.4
.4
.4
.4
I
I
.4
.4
.4
.4
.4
.4

"The
gang s all here-"

-e'en though 'tis wicked
weather out. Another triumph
for modern science. Tower
can take men, a meeting-place
and a rain-storm, mix them all
toether,'and get themmen
home dry from head to foot.
(This guarantee applies to ex-
terior only.)
Fish Brand Varsity Slickers
are roomy, smartly cut, long-
wearing. Full-lined for
warmnth as well as rain pro-
tection. Lighter models-the
"Topper" and the feather-
weight "Kitcoat." Variety of
colors. Sold everywhere. Look
for the fish on the label. It's

Day
Rates from Ann Arbor to: "ta
AKRON, 0.... ~...a; ...:."s
..
ALGONAC. ..................
BAY CITY................... ....
BIRMINGHAM.................
CHEBOYGAN..LL................
DETROIT.......... .........
ESCANABA. , ............
IMLAY CITY..................':
INDIANAPOLIS, IND.. "... ......
IRONWOOD . . . ............... .
ST.W OSEP.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LOUIS ,O...............
MT. JCLEPH.EN.S... .........
OT.w o Us.... .. . . ". . . . .. .. . . .
SAULT STE. MARIE, MICH.. ....
YPSILANI. ............... ..

y
Station
$0, 25
.80
.50
.70
.30
1.35
.30
1.55
.50
1.05
2.15
1.40
.45
.50
1.10
.60
.95
1.95
1.55
.10

on

The apu

MANN

Lots of Cartoon~s

1 Ph otographs

Stories

I Your calls will be speeded if you give the II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan