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April 29, 1930 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-04-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, APRIL 29, 1930

wr wi . nrr rn i

HARRY CHANDLER
SENAME DPRESIDENT
UPHOLDS RELIoIONl ..
IN SUNDAY SPEECH'

( x it f THREE POWER NAVAL CONFERENCE LIMITS NUMBER
M U AULT OFBATTLESHIPS TO SUPPLEMENT AMERICAN NAVY TINUREDULs
Eover Soon ExpectedC to Per-
PA UE L EQATIN .t Actual bying Down of DAIN CAR CRH
E. ISTMargarek Nt M. Sager Fatally Huirt
TOAEASTERNOMETSEightHeen0cru- Early Sna onn
-~, r - A sers. each a sheer 1,0000 tons of'

Seven Will Travel as MedicaliI ?.'.-W---AwVLA4iE
erfihtaei strength. are to supple-
Representatives to Series ,ment Uncle Sam's "ships of the

INQUEST

TO BE HELD

of Auntal Gatherings.

chance that our great grand child- WNW
ren w ill see the com plete collapse ie od p it tr e er
of the Christian church, stated Dr. ! Harry Chandler.
Conrad. H. Moehiman of Rochester, ! Of; the Los Angeles Tines who
N. Y., in a convocation lecture spon- was elected president of the Anmer-
sored by the Student Christian as- ican Newspaper Publishers' Asso-
clation recently. For m-any years
sociation, Sunday night in Hill aud- Chandler has been one of the coun-
itorium. tries leading publishers.
"Ls Christianity Doomed?" was
the subject of the talk in wiich r
Dr. Moehlman discussed the case
for and against. Christianity. In
the discussion against the Chris-
ian church the speaker stated that

been fought in the name of Jesus T of Courts.
Christ. He went on to indict the hose of Courts
church by saying tha t after becom-
ing complicated, the creeds of the DRAWS UP SCHEDULE!
Christian religion had become static
and had failed to keep in step with The history and growth of public
modern progress. With only about utilities commissions, their present
15 per cent of the population of the status in the governmental struc-
United States being interested. in ture, and their powers with' respect
religion, and only three out of a to public utilities such as railroads.
hundred being influenced by the electric power companies, and gas
teachings of the church, the picture companies, were discussed by Arth-
looked pretty black for the future ur H. Ryall, '02L, Escanaba, non-!
of Christianity, said Dr. Moehlman. resident lecturer on the Law school
On the other hand, it was point- faculty, in the first of two lectures
ed out that there was an ever in-) delivered yesterday afternoon in
creasing need for religion and that the Law building on practice before
Christian traditions were so firmly public utilities commissions.
rooted in our life that they could Mr. Ryall pointed out that al-
not easily be displaced. The speak- though the utilities commissions are
er cited as modern institutions that not. courts, they' exercise powers
had their beginnings in religion, quite like those of courts in .that
su.ch symbols as our calendar, the they find facts in specific cases, and
alphabet, the days of the week, be- make orders to govern the action.
sides such cultural efforts as paint- of utilities, much as courts wouldj
ing, music, and medicine. do.
Afer describing the vastness of Among the most important ques-
our celestial universe by means of tions raised by. commission pro-'
several comparisons, Dr. Moehlman 3eedings, according to Mr. Ryall, are
said that if mankind failed to find how far they may go in ignoring.
a meaning in it all, the human race judiciary rules of evidence, how far'
would die out as a result of pessi- they may go in interfering with the
misn. To further stress man's in- management of public utilities, and
nate need of spiritual life, he said to what extent they may proceed,
that religion dealt with the mys- without being subject to judicial re-
terious border land between the view.
known and the unknown, and that Mr. Ryall stated that probably:
as long as there remained anything the most important but least un-
in human experience that could not derstood question in utility prac-1
be explained by science, there would , ice today is just where to draw the!
be a need for some kind of philos- line between proper regulation bas-
Qphy or religion. Ied upon the police power on the one
Professor Moehlman, a former hand, and improper and illegal in-
member of the University faculty terferences with management by
and now professor of the history the owners on the other hand.
of Christianity at the Colgate- In the second lecture, he dis-
Rochester Divinity school, will con- cussed the building up of a rate
tinue his Ann Arbor visit with three schedule of a public utility. Such
lectures under the auspices of the factors as valuation of physical
Michigan School of Religion on the properties, depreciation, going value
subject of Puritanism, and working capital were defined.

MANY PAPERS 'PREPARED
Warthin and Welter to Appear.
on Program of Historical
Research Society.
Michigan's medical school faculty
will be well represented at a series
of conventions of societies prom.
inent in national medicine, opening
on May 5, 6, and'7. with a meeting
of the American College of Physi-
I cians at Philadelphia. To this gath-
IeCring Dr. Aldred Scott Warthin, di-
rector of the pathological )abora-
tories of the Medical School, will
go as a member of the board of
regents.
Following this, the University
Medical School will send sevei
representativAs to the annual con-
vention of the Association of.
American Physicians meeting on
May 6 in Atlantic City, all of whom
will appear on the speaking pro-
gram.
Papers to be read at-the associa-
tion meet include "Liver Change
in Grave's Constitution," by Dr!
Carl V. Weller, Assistant Director of
t h e pathological laboratories;
"Syphilis as a Factor in Coronary
Artery Disease," by Dr. Warthin;
"Additional Observations on the
Use of Dessicated Hog Stomach in
Patients with Pernicious Anemia,
prepared jointly by Dr. Cyrus C.
Sturgis and Dr. Raphael Isaacs'
both of the Simpson Memorial In-
stitute; and "The Character of "the
Excitation Wave in the Cardiac
Muscle, and the Theory of Opposed
Potential Difference," a result of
co-operative research by Dr. Frank
-N. Wilson, Dr. John A. MacLeod,
and Dr. Paul S. Barker.
On May 7, two of the Association
delegates, Dr. Warthin and Dr. Wel-
i ler, will appear on the program of
the American Society of Medical
History, meeting concurrently and
in the same city with the Associa
tion. Dr. Warthin, who is vice-
president of the Society, will dis-,
cuss "The Physician of the Dance
of Death," while Dr. Weller will
lecture on "Lead Poisoning and the
English Books of Trade."
HARVARD UNIVERSITY - A
study of college'entrance examina-
tions and the effect of such -ex-
aminations upon the curriculum
and methods of the secondary
schools and on the student's
preparation for work in college is
now being carried on 'by the Crim-
son, the college newspaper.
'.X11# IJ 11 il tIl 1[t I JJllliltilitlltlJllll
RENT A RADIO
CROSLEY-AMRAD
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Augusta about March, 1931. mi
-The 10 to follow will come out!
of the 15 authorized in the cruiser
bill} of 1929. Plans for two of the,
10 already have gone forward in
private yards, one at Camden, N. J.,
and _the other at Quincy, Mass. *..
The 18 will be the only modern
cruisers in the United States navy.
'Long and low, the new cruisers
are veritable thunderbolts of steel.
Their speed is about 33 knots an y
hour. The Salt Lake City and the
Pensacola mount 10 8-inch guns but -r:<x.^^.r:
the remainder will have nine guns,a
three to a turret.
They -will average 600 feet in
length, with a 66-foot beam and
draw 20 feet. The engines will de-
velop about 107,000 horsepower.
Heavy armor will cover the decks,
as a ;precaution againsthairplane Cruisers Salt Lake City (top) already commissioned, and Louisville
-bombs and in addition to the heavy
Bns the cruisers will carry four (center) and Northhampton (below) now building, are three of 18
5-inch anti-aircraft guns, six tor- new fighting ships allowed United States under new :treaty signed at
pedo tubes and two airplanes whichL
are launched from a catapult. London.

line."
The quota was fixed by the threeI
power pacts of the London naval
conference and Chairman French
of the house naval appropriations I
-subcoimttee says President Hoo- j
ver is expected soon to permit the
actual laying down of three of the
craft.
Two of them, the Salt Lake City
and the Pensacola, already are1
commissioned. The Northampton,
Houston and Chester are expected'
to becready for service about June
1., and the Louisville, Chicago and

Miss Margaret M. Sager, 24. of
1000 East Washington street, was
fatally injured, Miss Marjorie Pe-
tersen, a student nurse rooming at
Couzens hall, and H. S. Moran, 311
Pine Ridge, sustained injuries when
an automobile driven by Horace L.
McCrow, 604 East Liberty street,
crashed into the curb in front of
the Dental building on North Uni-
versity avenue early Sunday mor-
ning.
Miss Sager was thrown from the
car by the force of the impact, re-
ceiving a fractured skull from
which she died a few mom'ents after
the accident. She was riding in the
front seat of the machine and is
believed to have struck her head
head on a tree.
Miss Petersen received injuries
about the head. She was taken to
University hospital where her con-
ditign was reported as good. Moran
was thrown from the car with Miss
Sager .nd sustained a fracture of
the arm. The three were taken to
the University hospital.
Two other occupants, Edward
Howard,.410 West Washington
street, owner of the car, and Ed-
ward Wheeler, a student in the Un-
iversity, escaped without injury.
According to Howard, the group
was returhing from Detroit when
the car skidded in making the turn
from Washtenaw Avenue onto
North University, striking the curb-
ing. Miss Sager, Miss Petersen -and
Moran were taken to the University
1-hospital.
An inquest into the accident will
be held at 5 o'clock Wednesday aft-
ernoon at the County building by
Dr. Edwin C. Ganzhorn, coroner.
Carl H. Stuhrburg, prosecutor, said
yesterday he would conduct a thor-
ough investigation in an effort to
place responsibility for the mishap.
HARVARD UNIVERSITY-During
the last few years there has been
a gradual relinquishing of class fes-
tivals: The Junior Prom was dis--
carded not long ago and now the
officers of the sophomore class
have announced that contrary to
traditions the class-smoker will be
abolished.

Clements Library Head
Returns From England
Dr. Randolph G. Adams, custo-
,dian of the William L. Clements
library,.will land today in New York
City, returning from. a stay of sev-
eral weeks in England on business<
for the library. It 1 expected het
will arrive in Ann Arbor this week1
end. Dr. Adams is sailing aboard
the Bremen.
YALE UNIVERSITY -- A cam-'
paign by the sophomore class isI
now on for the purpose of raising;
$3,000 to be used as a loan fund
for needy students of the class.

Lindbergh Again Writes
of Air With Epochal

Chapter in Conquest
Flight Over Caribbean

«3 Associated Prss) . 1several minutes ahead of the sched-
Cristobal, Canal Zone, April 28.- ule he had set for himself. The
Col. Charles A. Lindbergh rested distance was 1,033.
here today after having written in His route was directly across the
a 10-hour and 31-minute flight Caribbean. sea to a point on the
from Havana Sunday another chap- Nicaraguan coast, instead of to
ter in man's conquest of the air.I Yucatan, and then down the coast
Leaving Havanna at 5:33 a. mn.,, to the refueling point. The saving
Col. Lindbergh set his big Sikorsky thus effected in distance is one of
plane down at Puerto Cabezas, the short cuts enabling the seven-
Nicaragua, at 11:37 a. m. and 35 day airmail between New York and
minutes later took off for France Buenos Aires, in inauguration of
Field, here, arriving at 4:04 p. m., which the flight was made.

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