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April 04, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY. APRIL 4. 1930

TI-IF.MICk-IGAN

DAILY

PAVE FIVE

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LEAGU1EDEEAS
FOUR TO STUDENT
FEDER ATION MIET
Well-known Speakers Scheduled
for Conference at State
College, Pennsylvania.
THYRSA AMOS TO SPEAK
Include Campus Review, Out-
door Breakfast in Program
of Entertainment.
Four women will represent the
University of Michigan League at
the sectional conference of the
National Student Federation oif
America which will be held from
April 8 to 12 at Pennsylvania State
College, State College, Pa Miss
Alice Lloyd, adviser to women, Mar-
garet Bush, retiring president of
the League, Eleanor Cooke, incom-
ing president, and Helen Jones,
newly-elected vice-president, have
been delegated to attend the con-i
ference.
A varied program of well-known
speakers has been planned, as
well as informal discussion groups
for the delegates at the conven-
tion. Miss Thyrsa Amos, president
of the American Deans Association
and dean of women at the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh, the new "sky-
scraper college," will address the
entire group on the subject of "Per-
sonality-A Real Objective in Col-
lege Education."
Other speakers on the program
are Miss Martha Biehle, travelling
secretary of the N. S. F. A. who has
visited Ann Arbor several times in
the last few years, and D. Mary
McConaughy. Miss Biehle will dis-
cuss "Our International Responsi-
bility, and the subject for Dr.
McConaughy's address will be "Un-
derstanding Ourselves."
Arrangements for entertaining
the representatives includes a re-
ception on Wednesday, the first
night of the convention, a campus
review on Thursday, followed by a
dinner on Friday sponsored by the
Women's Athletic Association and
a formal dance. An outdoor break-
fast has been planned for Satur-
day morning, and the conference
will close with a formal banquet
Saturday night.
The conference will include rep-
resentatives from all of the col-
leges and universities of the central
section. Miss Helen Faust will act
as chairman of the convention.
kThe western section will hold a
conference at the same time at
,Laramee, Wyoming, the University
of Wyoming.
WOMEN GRANTED
HOUR'S AUDIENCE
AT CONFERENCE
Nicholas Politis (Greece), chair-
man of the nationality committee
of the conference on Codification
of International Law, now in ses-
sion at the Hague, has granted one'
hour to the organized groups of
women to express their views on
the question for women.
The women have been lobbying
the delegates assiduously since the
beginning of the conference and
the formal audience is not neces-
sary to inform the convention of
the women's views, but it givves
them an opportunity to formally
present their stand.
Two women will speak-one to
represent the organized groups who

ask for equality in nationalty laws,
the other to take the contrary
view. The only contrary view so far
made public is that of a group of
about 12 Dutch women lawyers, not
associated with any organization,
who have presented a petition de-
claring that the existence of the
two nationalities in the same fam-
ly might have serious consequences
to its unity.
YALE UNIVERSITY- After his
concert given at Yale, Arthur Whit-
ing, famous musical artist, will re-
tire from active life in the musical
world and will devote his time en-
tirely to composition.

SUCCESS ATTAINED BY CONTRALTO lAGAINS NOTICE IN
IN STEADY, CONSISTENT PROGRESS1 lMiR19HII VGOLF TOURNEYS
Ecountry for the contralto part in IRIIII II' PIIU
Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and f~IfIUUUL LIIi
Shssung the part in the perform- F lIK~I
ance of Mahler's Choral Symphony.
Miss Alcock has been engaged in
this year's May Festival for the U IL
I important concert Thursday eve-
ning when she will have two diffi- Each House May Have Entrants
cult roles in Honegger's King David in Singles and Doubles
and B a c h's Magnifient, which
choral numbers will be offered by Tournament.
h...f.....:....h..::.t heran ioner andil te Chicag

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- the Choral Union and the Chicago
Symphony orchestra.
ELX IZABTH HATCH
G1 I HilI
GIVNRFLECUP1
- University of Missouri Defeats
Merle Alcock. Michigan by One Point in !
Teegraphic Meet.
But six years ago Merle Alcock T
was the only singer in the roster MISS HATCH SCORES 971
of the Metropolitan Opera House
of American birth and American Final scores in the rifle match
training. Music was Miss Alcock's held in connection with the annual
goal from childhood. Her early Intramural indoor sport meet of
years were spent in musical train- March 27, have been determined.
ing and she attended Drake Con- Elizabeth Hatch, '31, won the cup
servatory at Des Moines, Iowa-
Then followed private instruction awarded to the victor in each sport t
with some of the foremost teachers of the meet by a score of 97. Helen
f in the country. Nicol, '30, took second place with a
There was nothing sensational in score of 96 and Frances Huff, third
her rise to prominence: it was place with a score of 94. The rifleI
rather labored, steady and contin- match could not be finished the
uous. It was accomplished chiefly night of the sport meet because it#
by careful preparation of many was necessary to have two elim-
operatic roles so that all oppor- inations to determine the highest
tunities offered might be realized. scorer.
Her appearances at the New York A telegraphic rifle tournament
temple of opera since her engage- was held last week with the Uni-
ment in 1924 have been consistent- versity of Missouri at Columbia'
ly fine, renewingly inspired; her which the Missourians won by a,
voice increases in beauty and tim- score of 492. over the University of
bre with its intelligent use; her Michigan's score of 491. A match
interpretativve forte, richly endow- was likewise held with the Wash- I
ed with feeling, has grown to no- ington State University at Pullman.l
bility of stature. As the scores were not telegraphed
Various features of her art-the the University of Michigan won
purity of her diction, the humility !this match by default.!
of her artistic intelligence,-have
made her the most popular artist PRINCETON UNIVERSITY-In'
in the country for festivals where continuation of the annual custom
choral works are planned. She ap- 'of leaving some memorial to the
pears every year at the Worcester university after graduation, mem-
Festival, several times at Evanston, bers of the class of 1930 will be in-
and several times in Ann Arbor. sured on the twenty-year endow-
She is the favorite artist in the ment plan,
Speca Sling
New Sprng Dresses
$13.75
BEGINNING FRIDAY
Crepes and chiffon, plain and printed, and knitted
suits. From the darker shades for general wear to the
dainty pastel shades for afternoon and evening.
New and carefully selected portraying the' unusual
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SPECIAL SHOWING OF HATS
'5.00

TO SIGN UP WEDNESDAY
Tournament Cards to be Posted 1
inBarbour Gymnasium and
in Field House.
With the opening of the spring
sport season an intramural ten-
nis tournament is being planned
by Margaret Eaman, 31,manager
of tennis, to begin immediately
after spring vacation. Tournament!
cards will be posted Monday in' Maureen Orcutt.
Barbour gymnasium and at Palmer Is showing great form in theE
Field house. All women who wish southern tourneys as a contenderI
to participate in the tournament for the women s national golf title.
must sign up by Wednesday.-
There is to be a singles and a GORDON DEAN TO
doubles tournament, making ithPrs- SPEAK TO GROUP
sible for each house to enter threeI
people. However, the person play- IN ARCHERY CLUB'
ing singles may be one of the dou-I
bles team; in case there are not Arrangements have been made
three experienced players in a by the Archery club by which Gor-
house. Independents may sign up don Dean of the Archers Company
in the same way, a woman playing of Pinehurst, North Carolina, will
singles may also play on a doubles speak to the members of the club
team. and all other women who may be
There will be no novice tourna- interested in archery at 4 o'clock
ment this year, as it has been found today in the lounge of the Palmer
that three tournaments going at Field house.!
once do not permit any one tour-! Mr. Dean is at present in Detroit
nament to be completed, the sea- for the Automobile Show, where he1
son being shortened considerably 'is demonstrating in the sports sec-:
by bad weather. Two tournaments tion. There will be all types of
should not overcrowd the courts bows on display at the meeting,
in good playing weather. with a demonstration of shooting.
There will be very strict rules This is the first - time the club,!
this year concerning the dates upon which is new this year, has had an
which matches are to be played. ( outside speaker and demonstration,
Any matches not played off by the and the organization extends a cor-
required date will be either struck dial invitation to anyone who is
out of the tournament, or forfeited interested, to attend the meeting.
by the person who delayed the-_ ______
match.
Any one who wishes to ask any
questions concerning the tourna- OPTICAL
ment may call Miss Eaman at
7117. DEPARTMENT

WOMEN DISPLAY
ABILITY OF MEN
IN SCULPTURING
Women can do ,scuiptural Wvork
of as great strength and perfection
as any ever executed by men,man .
tained Dr. George F. Kuntz, presi-
dent of the Ameican Scenic and
Historic Preservation society, and
research curator of precious stones
at the American Museum of Nat-
ural History, in his speech recently
addressed to a meeting of the
Women's Press club in New York.
"There are 25 American sculpt-
resses of note," Dr. Kuntz said,
"Seventeen of them are members
of the National Sculpture society;
out of a total membership of 27.
But they turn out a seventh of the
work."
"Women's chief contribution 'to
sculpture in the last few years
has been seen in the improvement
of garden statuary, "which, throughj
their work, has been transformed,
from the artistically worthless old
cast-iron objects to the present
works of stone of high artistic,
value."

TtTRT'TCl ?NC MAVX

Announcement has recently been
made of the seventh annual art
exhibits to be held by- members of
the art sections of the Faculty
Women's club the first half of the
weel of May 4 in Alumni Memorial
hail..
The exhibition is to be a no-jury
affair and each woman will hang
her own works in a group so that
her improvement throughout the
year may beeasily noticed.
."Within the last seven years
there ias been developed quite an
art group here in Ann Arbor," said
Mrs. John B. Waite; member of
one of :the sections and president
of the Ann Arbor Art association
while discussing the forthcoming
show.
'The Faculty Women's club has
i three art sections. The first of these,
or the advanced group, has been
1 working under the direction of
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser and paint-
ings in various mediums will be ex-
hibited by these women," averred
Mrs. Waite. "Two members of this
group were represented in the in-
i.dependent artist show which just
I closed in Detroit."
"Mr. Frederic Aldrich is the ar-
chitectural' critic for the second
section. The third, or more elemen-
tary, group is the craftsman sec-
tion.

ART LUBTO. GIVE
A-NNUAgL EXH IBITIO
Faculty Women's Club to Show
Own Paintings in Alumni
Memorial Hall.

A

There will be an important.
meeting of the central commit-
tee for the Athletic Conference
of American College Women at
3:30 o'clock today in the W. A.
A. office in the League building.
All women who are making
programs for Orchesis are ex-
pected to turn them in by Sat-
urday, to room 14 in Barbour
gymnasium.
There will be a meeting of the;
Archery club at 4 o'clock at the
Field house. All women interest-
ed in taking part in an archery
exhibition for the Schoolmaster's
convention, April 26 are invited
to attend the meeting.

I -

Friday, aturday, Monday

MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW j
EUROPE, ORIENT o0
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LINE
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PSTRAVELERS CHEQUES, ETC.
E.G.KEBLER ,Steamship Agi
eJ&aBe~dct 01_ . Hurit. Aun ArboR I

Lenses and Frames N4ade to Order
Optical Prescriptions Filled
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hiffon, French heels . . . . . 1.29
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