100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 PA m' T TI n

Ttr 141~r-MTC~AC'AN DAILY

ThURSDAY, MARCh 13, 1930

r Avv J A £Ai.. IVIAY A .ARA'.S *

----- . _.
..-_

! W
TELESCPE HRADY1
Mirror of Pyrex Glass Is Only
Part of New Instrument 1
Not Built Here.
'WILL BE DONE BY FALL1
niversity Observatory Anong
B Eest Equipped Stations
in United States.
Professor W. C. Rufus of the Uni-
versity Observatory department has
amnounced that the new reflecting
teescope is about ready to assem-
ble and install in the Angell Hall
observatory, although it will not be
set for use until some time this
,criing fall.
A mirror made of the famous
Pyrex glass is the only part of this
new machine that was not built in
the observatory shop. This mirrorj
is fifteen inches in diameter, and
the delicate grinding and polishing
of the surface was done by Fecker
,of ' Pittsburgh, successor to the
Brashear Company who furnished
the mirror for the larger reflecting
telescope now in the observatory.
Parts Designed Here.
The remainder of the parts were
designed and made in the oserv-
atory shop. Everything about this
new machine has been wholly com-
plated and the telescope is now
ready for assembly. The mirror,
the finest piece of mechanism toe
have ever been installed in a Ui-
versity instrument, arrived but a
few days ago, and although the
,,achine will not be mounted fore
some time, the assembly of thez
parts wi-ll take place at once.
This new addition to the Angell.
HEall Observatory will give two
telescopes to this section of the
Astronomy department, the other
being a ten inch refracting tele-.
scope that has been the only in-
,strument installed to date on top
of the literary building. Since twov
domes were built when the observ-
atory was established, there will be.
adequate space for the installation
of this new telescope, and it will
jnake the Angell Hall laboratory1
one of the most fully equipped of
its kind in the country.
Is of Latest Design.
This new instrument has taken
over a year and a half to build
and is of the most efficient andI
of latest design. It will be the sec-
ond reflecting machine to be used
by the University astronomy de-
partment and its operation this fall
will give many students an oppor-
tunity for good observations, be-
fore made difficult due to te large;
number enrolled in the courses.
Chief Justice Diligent
in Preparing Speeches
(By Asstciated Press)
NEW YORK, March 12.-An in-
teresting sidelight on the charac-
ter of Chief Justice Charles Evans
Hughes, showing the care which he
prepares his public addresses,*was
given at a luncheon meeting of the
Delta Upsilon club of New York
Tuesday by Col. Frederick Melvin
Crawford, military secretary to Mr.
Bughes when he was governor of
10ew York.
After the Chief Justice's recent
address before the City Bar Associ-
aion on the World Court, of which
he was then a member, hie was

asked whether his speech was ex-I
tenperainos, Col. Crawford said.
The Chief Justice replied that it
wamn't. He didn't speak from notes,
but he said he had spent 40 hoursI
preparing himself for the speech.
"I arose at 6 instead of 7 every,
morning for 40 days," he quotedl
Mr. Hughes as saying, "Mrs. Hughes
arising at 5:30 to make coffee for
me. During those extra 40 hours
1 gained I outlined in my mind
what I was to say."

NEW

WOMEN'S ALTITUDE RECORD [Mitche1 Mentioned
ESTABLISHED BY ELJNOR SMITH' Lfor Supreme Court
" :. , : > >;:" : :> .. G erm an U niversity Professor, ; T
Now at Westinghouse, to
* I. Instruct During Summer. ~
".TIMOSHENKO ON LEAVE
Prof. A. Nadai, research engineer
for the Westinghouse Electric Co.,
and former professor of applied .
Smechanicsat the University of
Gottingen, Germany, will this sum-i
mer fill the position of Prof. Ste--
phen Timoshenko, of the engineer-
ing mechanics department, who
will attend an international meet-
ing of engineers in Europe.
Professor Nadai will offer courses
of an advanced nature in "The
Plastic State of Material in Con-'
struction" and "Applied Elasti- 1
,ty epartmentsm oher thansbtild will . efI t Q
engineering mechanics will build Wiliam r. ithe
courses around Professor Nad~ai's Attorney general of the United
work. States, who has been suggested to
This will mark the first summer fill the vacancy in the supreme
that the University has had the court caused by the recent death
cooperation of a large concern in of Justice Edward T. Sanford.
contributing to the summer school
faculty; and according to Prof.
L. A. Hopkins, secretary of the en-
gineering college, the practice will
4e continued. Courses offered by
these men will be primarily for
teachers in technical schools in the
United States and Canada. "
! Last summer Professor Timo-
shenko gave a series of courses Original Plates of Nineteentf
similar to those that will be off:}r- Century Artists Placed
. , :, :, ti: , r"... ed by Professor Nadai. Approxi- on2Exhibition.
mately thirty men from all parts __x____
..... .~ - - ~of the country took advantage of
the work. DISCARD SOMBER STYLES

I

DEPARTMENT BUYS,
ELE PiCUL DEVICE
Electrical Engineering School
Purchases New Cathode
Ray Oscillograph.
COST MORE TAN $4000

#-0

:.1
..
M
i
IIiM
ICY
A
Ilr
IM+
r
M1
r
r
r
w
w
i r

Prof. Benjamin F. Bailey. of the
electrical engineering department,1
announcecd yesterday the purchase
rf a cathode ray oscillograph by
the U.iversity for experimental'
purpo~se. The apparatus, whichw
2ost more than $,,Q00, was pur- I
chased from the General Electric
company, and is -the latest of its
typ° on the market.
Measuring the speed of the pas-
sage of an elcctric current, espe-
cially in arcs, and obtaining pho-
tographs of curcnt passage are a
few of the functons of the new
oscillograph, which can measure
wave intervals up to and exceed-
ing one ten millionth of a second.
The older apparatus, in use before
the purchase of the new device,
was capable of measuring speeds
. near one hundred thousandth of a
second, Professor Bailey stat cd.
For the past month, the elec-
trical engineering department has
been conducting a series of ex-
h periments to measure the speed of
current passing through arcs, withj
the aid of apparatus loaned by the
Detroit Edison company for the
purpose. The tests were conduct-
S ed in the R. 0. T. C. garage, in the

i

What is believed to be a new altitude record for women pilots wasi

I

established recently by Elinor Smtih, 18-year-old aviatrix, when she as- M t CS
cended to an apparent height of 32,000 feet at Roosevelt field, N. Y. She; tary C 1113 4W
is shown here being carried from her plane by Carl Schneider (right), Increased Enr llment
who installed her baragraph, and Ben Zebora, mechanic, after she ha' _
established the record. Miss Smith is also the holder of the women's Enrollments for the Citizens' Mil-
record for staying aloft in sustained flight. itary Training Camps, which began
March 1, showed a gain of a little
Unimportant Coal Bill Amendment Defeat ay more than 20 percent for the first,
Not Cause Fall of Labor Party, Says Hayden ten day enrollment period over the
the same period in 1929, it was an-
With the advent of Prime Min- to a revolt avgainst the leadership nounced yesterday by Phelps New-
ister MacDonald's second labor of Mr. Baldwin. berry, civilian aide to the secretary
government's first defeat, consid- "Both parties are afraid to oust of war. Enrollment for Michigan
erable discussion has arisen as to the MacDonald ministry, for fear duringthis
whether Mr. MacDonald will be that the prime minister, at a new ringhis period totaled 373,
forced to resign on the outbreak of! election, will gain an absolute ma-j which is approximately 25 percent

i
i)
,)

new agitation in the House of Corn- jority. Furthermore," continued oUI1e total a ot1Uito U WnigIIWfor
monsg Prof. J. R. Hayden, of the Professor Hayden, "the Liberals fear 1930.
political science department, in dis- 1the anger of the country if they ,500 applicants have been accept-
cussing the question, stated that, oust the government at the time of Fnrollment will be closed when
"Lloyd George and Mr. Baldwin the naval onfternacDonaldrec-ed, and oficials ask that all men
mustered the full strengths of their of"PrimelinistertMatonald rec
respective parties and outvoted the ognizes his defeat with the amend- who desire to attend the camps
MacDonald group. ment to the coal bill, but refuses, this year submit their applications1
"It has come to be a constitu- to resign. His removal wile early to avoid the possibility of hav-
tional practice in England," said ifee fteCnevtvshv
Professor Hayden, "that the prime vote of censure passed in the House ing to wait until next year.
minister does not have to resign )of Commons." - .
when defeated on a relatively min-2Meanig
or matter. Mr. MacDonald was AMHERST SENIORSC oiudTellm Manarn
dfaeonaamnmntote* I of Coe n Antarct ic
much discussed coal bill, and al- PERMIT TED AU TOS'
though the coal question is of ma- (By Associated Press)
jor importance, the amendment is Those with Scholastic Average DUNEDIN, New Zealand, March
only minor, and its defeat does not o 75% Allowed Cars 11-Dr. Lawrence Gould of the Uni-,
warrant the resignation of the pres- o 5versity of Michigan, geologist of the
ent cabinet." t-expedition, said that the discovery
Professor Hayden went on to ex- ;. Asscidted re s>)of coal on Mount Nansen had con-I
plain that the fate of the Mac- AMHERST, Mass., march 12.-- vinced him that the Antarctic un-
Partial abolition of a rule prohibit- ( til comparatively recent years had
donald ministry has rested in the .cr a
hands of the Liberal and Conserv- ing students of Amherst college either had a tropical or sub-tropi
ative parties since the date of the from driving automobiles during a cal climate. Dr. Gould said he had
last election. "The Liberals are very college year was announced today determined further that the great
badly divided," Professor Hayden by Dean Geoffrey Atkinson, fol- barrier was a floating sea of ice'
averred. "One section of the party lowing a conference with the stu- anchored to islands and, moun-
is following Lloyd George and the dent council committee. tains; that the Ross sea extended
other section are the former fol- I The ban, which has been in ef- many more miles eastward than
lowers of Lord Asquith, now under! fect since the spring of 1928, will first supposed and that the Queen
the leadership of Lord Gray. The be lifted after the spring vacation j Maude range of mountains was the.
Conservatives are also divided, due next month so that seniors ,with a greatest in the world, and unlike
--scholastic average of 75 per cent.or either .the Himalayas or the An-
over, and with their parents' peri- des. It is of the fault block type, he
Sentence Ex-Commoner mission, will be allowed the use of said, and o:R them were found two

rear of the automotive engineering
Original fashion plates of the laboratories, under the direction of
,nineteenth century are now on dis- Prof. William G. Dow, who is es-
play in the down stairs lobby of the pecially interested in this type of
library, it was announced yester- i.experimentation.
da by W. W. Bishop, head librarian. Feeling the necessity of owning
Close observation of many of apparatus of its own for wcrk of
these plates will reveal a truth of such an iimportant nature, the
character in the expressign of the Uiaiversity purchaised the present
figures and other artistic qualities device, which now reposes in the
that are lacking in modern work. basement of the west engineering
of this kind. They illustrate the building, in the electrical labora-
changing trends of fashion and tories.
show how historical events fre-
quently here influences changes Byrd Cs
of dress.B r onsiders Scond
At the beginning of the nine- Antarctica Expedition
teenth century, for instance, we
see a reaction against the somber (I11 Associated Press)
styles of the French Revolution and DUNEDIN, New Zealand, March
a return toward the Greek idea of 12-The possibility that Rear Ad-
dress. Then subtle Egyptian in- miral Richard E. Byrd will take an- 1
fluences are the result of Napo- other expedition into the Antarc-
leon's Egyptian campaign. Again, tic was forseen here today.
his Russian campaign is later re- Admiral Byrd, in an interview,
flected in the dress of the second said : "If I were to say what I am
decade of the century. In the going to do next, my remarks
early sixties the Garibaldi shirt is would cause a sensation."
a witness to the popularity of that Although the intrepid explorer,
here.. i ho returned Monday after more,
The plates exhibited show quite ? than a year at the bottom of the
completely the styles of the first world during which he flew over
part of the century, but due to the the South Pole, declined to com-
limited space the dress of the latter mit himself further, the trend of
.part of the century is but brieflyreve12ts here and feeling amonag hsj
illustrated. party indicates that he hopes to ye-
turn to the Antarctic to make fur
ther explorations:east of the Ross
Senate Beats Kentucky sea.exporatinsseatiof Veto
Governor's Falls Veto
(BY Assuciatcd Pr'.s) ,II iE
I FRANKFORT, Kentucky, March
11-The Kentucky senate today VL~ . 0 4-1
overrode Gov. Flem D. Sampson's

MUM III111111 1841111111 1111 If liffiffi I I I I
i r
.r
..
cr
" r
ALL
" r
r
r
r
r
r
Irri
r
r r
Yr
Y Yi
a'i!
r
r 4W
WLEK
r i!
rr
w !
r rr
i 1 r
w
'" r
r
r
r
e r
w
i
rw
i
e
w.
w
4°.
i
FY i
i "r
i w
1O1
i
i
i i
i
w ""
i i
M
s M
i Y1M
IIIF Y
i
i
i
i 41
i
w
s
nF w
r
r
rril -
r
Y!
w '
r r
w
r
riw
w
r
w
w
Fr
r
r w
rrr
r
4
'r
r "
"!r F
rr "
r
W v
yw w
Y
Lrl"
r !
!
Y
rYR Y
!w Y
r !
Y
YIIIII .
yr 1
fY"!
1
r
YW
Y
WF
111E
iM1
YYb
w
r
Yrir
r
I +
' r
Ls
r:"
r
r
wr
r
w
r
ilk
Yirir
r
w
r
Yb _
T
"YYF
Yw
A!
r
w
r
wr _
r
.r
i
VYIII
r"
!WF
r
r
1114
Y:Y1
1Yw
1i
r
r IIIr
rY
r
:11f!
yw ..
'. MY
r
"Iw
Y
4
-s
rr
r
I y!4.
r
r
wr
r
F
M
r
.r!
r
w
r
'. T
I
FP
11 "
r
wM
r
r
,lYr
w
r
r
r
w

At 8:-015
~ '' MKIMES

r
i
r
i
i
w
i
iR
w
s
A
w
ii
e
r
w
s
r
r
r
H
W
Y
w
ii
R
i
4r
AM
R
rIR
Iw
IR
i
Y
111
_
wl
( Yr
r
MY
111
A
Irk
'
Y
M
11
i
1!
r
M
rr
w
'Y
r
r
r
w
"ife
r
W
h1
it
T
'
yM
'inri
+K
i
..
,
_
rnr
ww
w
n4
w
r
"F
r
,
are
rr
w
a
'Mrs
ti
IM
.
,, r
_
w
r
w
w
wr
T
':M
AY
_
w
r,
r
n.
r
.,
,
w
a
rrw
is
r
w
w
,
.
wn
s
;
s
a
Mr1
w
,w
rr
+n
a
nn

/

vero or Lne Cumberland Falls bill
which provides for acceptance ofE
Coleman Dupont's,.offer to buy the
falls and adjacent lands and give
them to the state. The governor fa-!
vored the plan proposec iDy the In-
sull power interests to beautify the,
falls and at the same time erect a'

PORK CHOPS
OR
HAMBURG STEAK
WITH
FRIED POTATOES
SALAD
35c

power plant.

to Serve Prison Term
(By A sociated Press)
OTTAWA, Ont., March 12.-Up-
on conviction at his fourth trial of
attacking a 17-year-old girl, Louis
M. Auger, 27, former youngest
member of the Canadian house of
commons, Tuesday was sentenced
to two years imprisonment in
Portsmouth penitentiary.
He has been in jail since last.
May, having been refused bail dur-
ing that time.

motor cars while attehding the col-
lege.
Dean Atkinson also rulcd that !
three men--the owner and two
others-may drive each car.
UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT-
In order to comply with the condi-!
tions of a will which bequeathed!
$5,000,000 to this institution, the
enrollment has been restricted to [
1,000 students, all of whom mustj
be residents of Vermont.0

of the world's largest glaciers.
Detroit Theatres M
CASS THEATER FOlLOW THE CROWDS
"NAUGHTY sMARIETTA" WARNER
with Halford Youg & Co.BROS.
Nights: 50c to X2.50
Sat. Mat.: 50c to $2.00 WORI
Popular Mat. Wed.: s50c to $1.50

I

..

RAE THEATRE TONDYS
NOW SHOWING
An All Talking Production
WOMAN T WOMAN
with
BETTY COMPSON-GEORGE BARRAUD
AND JULIETTE COMPTON
Direct from showing in Detroit
Positively first time in Ann Arbor.

i
t
F
{E
E
t#
i{(
i
}
7
{)
7
(i
f
f
V

L.AST
TIMEUS
TODAY

VUE

jJIIam

SH OWS AT
2RTH 0-3:30
7:00-9:00

R

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan