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February 02, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-02-02

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FOUR

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SUNDAY, FEI3RUARY 2, 1930

T

Stralityin this fight on the part of used diplomacy or arms to settle
the Student council or the Inter- the uprisings in India. Within the
Published every morning except Monday fraternity council will necessarily last few years the things that Brit-
dring the University year by the Board inbe
Control of Student Publications. tantamount to their giving up ish did in India have shocked the
Member of Western Conference Editorial the ghost. World; the houses searched with-
Association. Bound up with the question of out warrant, men seized and im-
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled Student government is the larger prisoned without trial for any
to the use for republication of all, news dis- question of University paternalism. length of time, men and women
Patches creditedato it or not otherwise credited How far or should the feculty at- peacefully working in the field
in this paper and the local> news published Hwfro hudtefcl
herein. tempt to delimit the extra-aca- bombed from the sky, all the in-
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, demic freedom of the students? habitants in a certain street in a
fichigan, as second class matter. Special rate Is the future of Michigan to be the city forbidden to go along the
o f postage granted by Third Assistant Post-Ygg
master General, history of numberless faculty-en- street even to get water or buy
Subscri,+ion by carrier, $4.00; by mail, forced rules and regulations, com- food except by crowling on their
offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May- parable in the strictness of their hands and knees. One of the most
r-ard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214. definition to those of a convent or inhuman thing that the British did
EDITORIAL STAFF a reform school? on the 19th of April, 1919, was the
Telephone 4925 The Daily welcomes the Senate shocking Amritsar massacre, in
MANAGING EDITOR commitee's action on one ground: 1which British soldiers attacked a
ELLIS B. MERRY it provides a test case par excel- peaceful religious assembly in a
lence to determine the future of public park, and shot down in cold
City Editor-.----.......ierce osenbergi fraternities and student self-gov- blood, killing or wounding more
News Editor- . .....Donald J. Klinelernment at Michigan. As the organ than 1,000 unarmed men, women
Sports Editor----Edward I,. Warner, e)r.
omen' ....Ew lar aljorFolim of the students, we are more than and children. Even the stones,
Tele rath ditr........Cassain A. Wilson anxious to do our share in a would have sympathy if details
Music and Druijia......William J. Gorman
Literary Editor........Lawrence R. Klein knock-down, drag-out fight to the were told. If the British wanted to
Assistant City 1,dito r. bc-rt J. Feldmran1
Night Eitors- ditorial Board Members finish on deferred rushing. disperse the crowd they could have
Frank E. Cooper Henry J. Merry .-o done it very peacefully. But what
williain C. Gentry Robert L. Sloss
Charles R. Iaiahi-an Walter W. Wilds did they do? They turned the guns
Gurney Williams ** toward the innocent and unarmed
Reporters Campus p1111 0p°1 people. Is this diplomacy? Let the.
Bertram AskNwith Lester May hContributors are asked to be brief, readers decide.

j Music And Drama
CHORAL UNION C ON( ERIT
Wednesday night, February 12, at
8:15, Elizabeth# Rethberg appears
in song 'recital.
IN LOVE WITH LOVE.
Conmeets by William J. Gorman.
Comedy Club must indeed be em-
barrassed. I certainly am; and I
saw several professors intereted in

i'or Bet ween
Ser ester
Travel
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Maxwell Biauer William Page

confining themselves to, less than 300
wordor ncsehes to itiscm

K. P. IDICULLA.I

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"a eyrtoard iLe Peekhat' mnunications will be disregarded. The
Eenitimin 11. Berentsonl'lugh Pierce 0 ''' ~ .,,,
Allan H. Berkinan Victor Rabinowitz i gnames of communicants will, however, U
Arthur, J. Bernstein- John D. Reindel be regarded as con~fideuitial, upon - UNCLE SAM S WILD OATS.
S. ~eali Coner Jeanie Roerts Iquest. Letters published should not be T heEitr
Thos. At. Cooley hA.Rulconstrued as expressing the ditori To the Editor:
Thomas M. Cooley sej A. Russell opinion of The Daily.«
SohmH. Denler jseph i tca z "Race rioting" seems no longer!
Heclen Domin~e William P. Salzarulo _______________________1
atearet Eerl3 Cals . pwart "AN HONEST OPINION" to be news in the Far West, especi-
Sheldon C. Fullerton S. Cadwell Swanson To the Editor: ally in California. A few weeks ago,
Rutth Geddes Jane Thayer
Cinevra -Ginn Margaret Thompsou Some are of opinion that the Filipinos in' Watsonville, in that
aek Goldsmith Richard 1.,Tobi present Indian struggle for free- state, were badly and unjustly
Dvorris Coverinan Elizabeth Valeiitine'
RossGustin Harold 0. Warren, Jr. don will be nipped in the bud, by treated because of an alleged la-
Margaret Harris Charles While.
David B. lepstead G. Lionel Willens British diplomacy, which is of bor dispute and because the boys
7. Cullen Kennedy J6lhn L. Willoughby doubtful validity. had white girls for dancing part-
Jean Levy Nathan Wise
Russell E. McCracken Barbara Wright The Sepoy Mutiny of India in nets.'Again, on Jan. 29, a bomb
Dorothy Magee Vivian Zirnit 1857, the massacre of Jallanwalla explosion in front of the Filipino
BUSINESS STAFF Bagh in Amristar (Punjab) and the I Club house in Stockton, Cal., ter- I
Telephone 21214 massacre of Madras in 1928, bear rorized thirty-six Filipinoe and
BUSINESS MANAGER ample testimony to the British destroyed the facade of the build-
A. J. JORDAN, JR. 'diplomacy.' The Mutiny is so well ing.
Assistant Manager . known that I do not dwell upon it, What does this all mean? On one
ALEX K. SCHERER but, the massacre of Jallanwalla hand it may mean that many so-
Bagh, where over a thousand were called Americans in that part of.
Department Managers injured and several hundreds killed, this great country are not any bet-
Advertising .............T. lster Mabley was successfully executed by Sir ter than the natives of the African
Advertising .. ........... ]asper 1I.1 Halverson
Advertising ............Sherwood A. Upton Michael O'Dwyer, the over-zealous jungles; that part of this country
Cicu on................J orerno. avLieutenant Governor of Punjab, by is still a rich field for missionary.
Accounts......................John R. Rose opening fire upon ten thousand un- work. On the other hand it may
Publications............George R. Hamilton rednpep o had mean hat therp n eolah
Business Secretary-Mary Chase armed people who had gathered mean that the Filipino people, who
for a peaceful demonstration are loyal to the Stars and Stripes
Byrne M. Badenoch Marvin Kobacker against the ignominiously notorious are not welcome in their Mother
,James E. Cartwright Lawrence Lucey { "Rowlatt Act." Though this deed country. If the latter, why not does
Robert Crawford Thomas Muir
Harry B. Culver George R. Patterson exposed Sir Michael O'Dwyer to no- Uncle Sam redeem his pledge of
oman .lvi s raleSanord toriety, he was lauded to' the skies honor by giving them freedom and
James Hoffer Joseph Van Riper in England, for showing the strong they will ask no more. Only in this
Dorris Johnson 1 obort Williamson
Charles Kline William R. Worboy arm of Britain. Oh! What a di- way can America atone for the
-Dorot y loonigardner Alice McCullyplomacy!! The tragedy of 1928 sins committed by her sons.
LageavCosinvi gk Ea Mie w ,,was for demonstrating against the The Filipino people as American
Bernice Glaser F orE.leano X alkinsha ie purely English Commission, sent subjects have always respected the!
J lortense Gooding Dorothea Waterman out to inquire into Indian Govern- Stars and Stripes; the FilipinosI
ment reforms. have always been loyal to America
Even the bullets and bayonets of and have always treated the Amer-
Night Editor, CHAS. R. KAUFMAN England, the most civilized and cul- icans in that island with respect
- - 'tured nation in the world, were not and honor, and with a hospitality
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1930 able to suppress Indian National that has never been bestowed on
Spirit, let alone diplomacy. another people. But in spite of all
A FIGHT TO THE FINISH. Though, the 'diplomatic impris- this, they in return receive insults
In' reply to several queries The onment' of Indian leaders without and violence and are treated like
Daily wishes to state that it has trial, at present, is patiently borne dogs when they come to this coun-
not surrendered to the deans' of- by the Indians, they look forward try. Is this the kind of treatment
fice and the Senate Committee on to the day of their liberation, 'Uncle Sam gives to his subjects
Student Affairs in the deferred which is not far off. They believe whom he adopted by force? Is this
rushing fight. Our silence of the in Bhagavat Gita which says, "Ac- the kind of treatment Uncle Sam
past week has not been that of sul- tions that are the outcome of a gives to his adopted sons and then
len capitulation but rather a post- sense of desire, will meet with dis- poses to the world as the champion

the dramatic situation on this cam-
pus in the same most miserable
condition. When a play that seems
little but a tissue of infantile puns '
about infantile sentiments, a play
one would most certainly recomn-
mend for the senior play in high DyT : IT-.eI
school (if the high school were a, <7-11AG
country, high school), rocks the
theatre with the laughter of tao
good-sized audiences, then I'.
critic is automatically relieved of Battle Creek
his task. He has no right to criti- Sogtl Bend
cise; only to comment. The Ma-
jority is an awful thing. C a o .
It would be rash to charge the Toledo
audience with being a bunch of
acquiescing fools, who have never CAMPUS TRAVEL
seen that long string of Reginald. ' v'4
Denny pictures. The only refugo
is in the, platitudinous "d, ,uti- - .nAux
bus, etc."
In Love With Love is a "play'
that skirts between comedy and ChiCago Ro u
farce. Comedy Club (which was .(
prompted in its choice and hurried 0rreS ndinb lgo
production of it only by the quite ' odher poin
justifiable matter of expediency)-
kept the play continually a farce CAMPUS TRAVE
by using the sledge-hamner tech-
nique on all the points, good and Fast Freq en
bad. The direction was, of courser l o DETR
abominable. In fact the whispered
rumor has been that there wasut JACK
any such thing; that in this produc- PONT
tion all 'the members have beep } Via Eastern D
just good friends.
Jeanette Dale is the tantalizing
cause of all the pugnacious passion 't TOLE
was quite charning; and indeed FLINT
her achievement froni the stand- ADRI
point of acting was intelligent en-
ployment of personality and natur-ViaShort
al gifts.'C A
Bob Adams, too, in his first j v- CAMPUS
enile part proved a satisfactory BURE
substitute for Alfred Foster whoP e
used to do all the "young foo"
parts in bad sentimental comedies , Union Side
last year. A certain lack of variety .
in his voice didn't matter mulah in n tn
a show that was hamnme- and tongs g ing T
anyway. His execution of several Februar)
different, scenes was gratifying andsnat_
something of an achievement. The
less said of the rest of tle cast the, WA T A
better. I
Without a doubt, in Love Wit-h ~ ~
Love is the worst thing that has
been done locally, with the possi-
ble exception of the Genevieve
Hamper Shakespeare at the Whit-
ney last fall. But then the audi-
ence laughed; hence, the embar- I
rassment. Comedy Club owes them-
selves an apology. Their next play
should be it.

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Special Musical Service
M'. Aubrrr'ii Q Iurd
SJNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, AT 7:45 P. M.
An instrumental and vocal program
Vested Choir of Men and Boys will sing.

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ponement of active propaganda
until we can present all the facts
with regard to fraternity finances,I
personnel, and scholarship that
have a bearing on the proposed de-'
ferred rushing plan. The collec-
tion of these facts involves a labor-{
ious examination of University
scholarship records for several
years back, and a study of condi-
tions in every undergraduate, fra-
ternity house on the campus. Due
to the pressure of examinations it
has been impossible to secure the
co-operation that this task de-
mands, necessitating a deferment
uitil next semester of our cam-
paign for the repeal of the defer-
red rushing plan recently adopted
by the Senate committee.
The Daily regards the issues rais-
ed by the Senate committee's ac-
tion as more vital to the students
than any in recent years. The
proposed deferred rushing plan
should not be regarded as a mea-
sure affecting only the 400 fresh-
men who pledge themselves to fra-
ternities. For every fraternity man
and every fraternity alumnus it
carries the immediate implication
that fraternities exercise a dele-
terious influence on freshman
scholarship. If this implication is
allowed to go unchallenged, it is{
but a step for the deans' office to
find fraternities a deleterious in-
fluence on scholarship in general,
and to order their, disbandment.
This phase of the proposed defer-
red rushing plan must be kept in
mind as underlying the financial
crisis which the plan will bring tol
a head in many houses.
The method, also, of the plan's
adoption focuses attention on the.
question of student government atj
Michigan. Before adopting the mea-I

aster, whereas, actions that are the
outcome of the sense of duty, will
be crowned with success and
glory" and look forward to that
day, when India will find a place
among other nations. .
- GEORGE ITTYERAII, '31E.
DIPLOMACY OR AIMS
IN INDIA,
To the Editor:
It is my earnest desire that the
readers of The Daily may under-
stand that my purpose of writing
a reply to Mr. A. L. Cross, theI
worthy professor, was not to create
any hostility between Americans
and Indians but just to show to the
readers of The Daily that the
statement Mr. Cross made about
the present Indian affairs was not
true.
My judgment that his statement
was not true was made for two rea- I
sons. One was my own experience
and the second was the little know-
ledge I' happened to get from the!
few books I read.
We do not have to go too far for
I statements and declarations. When
Mr. Fenner Brockway was here one
of the professors of the University
asked him whether Britain could
settle the present uprising in India
.by their diplomacy. The reply from'
Mr. Brockway was that Britain
could settle it only by airplanes!
and bombs.
The nrese~n# unrivinw inotfrom

of democracy? Yes, America is
sowing her wild oats and is sure to
reap them sooner or later. If this
sad misfortune continues and
grows, America will not be surpris-
ed should the Filipinos, though
they would gain their ends peace-
fully if they could, once more pour,
out their blood, proving once more
to the world their. desire to be a
people.

S. 1. CABANATAN, '33.
---

I

Editorial Comment

-1

MEN AND MORTAR.
(From Yale News.)

The reactions of leadihg educa-
tors to the Harkness gift to Yale
have been virtually unanimous in
praise of the donor and the motive
behind the gift. Among the most'
suggestive comments received by,
the News was that of Dr. Samuel
Drury, headmaster of St. Paul's
at Concord, who cmphasizes the vi-
tal necessity of focussing atten-
tion on the selection of the person-
nel of the new quadrangles.
Dr. Drury's comment expresses
what in the years to come will al-
most certainly be a source of trial
to the administation. For the
whole new residential concept up-
on which Yale has now placed the
stamp of her unqualified official
nnierl n kf fll r ead owily

ELIZABETH IETHBERG.
No better artist could have been j
secured in the Choral Union series
to prevent anti-;limax after the
splendid enthusiasm of the Uoro -
witz recital than Elizabeth Reth-
berg, who in the past 'few years
has won herself a bright positionl
in the Metropolitan constellation,I
Musicians and critics everywhere
agree in placing her among the l
few really great singers of t i age.
Madame Rethberg's vers;l;iliyi
is the most amazing aspect of her
musical genius. In most of her op-
eratic roles the dramatic qualities
of her voice have stood out; yet
she is one of the foremost Mozart-
ian singers of the day, having a
perfect coloratuca, singing tl
light runs with complete ease and
beautiful tone-quality, In recitt1,
she is a lovely lyric singer, ptsse -
sing one of thie largest reper-tiris
of German lied'r of ainy c rciert I
soprano.
The crowning triunipt of M inc.
Rethberg's career was her nariifi-
cent interpretation of the part of
Ranutendelein in Respight's 'The
Sunken Bell" which had its pre- 1
miere last season at Metrop litan
in New York. A critic wrote of her
performance: "Respighi has writ-
ten music for his elfin heroine that
throats merely human scan na'rdlvy
hope to negotiate, and yet Mnm F
Rethberg met I-he exorbitant d-I
mands on vocal range, streng:th F
and agility with a victorious t
sourcefulness." Mr. Riespighi him
self was so delighted with her SII-
ing of the role that he dedicated
his manuscript of the opera to her.-I
Mlle. Rethberg comes from
family of musical culture w!I
trained her carefully. In fa cki,.I
was something of a prodigy of tin
piano until she di covered the rm-1i
beauty of her voice, Fritz Rein#er

pl pCul g ~al s 1Liu approvai inm ia more y tlu
an illiterate group of people but than a house of cards if the nour-
it is from an educated group, as a ishment of effective leadership
matter of fact almost all the lead- cannot be injected into its com-
ers have had western eduction, too. ponent parts. "Buildings do not
ers have had western education, create personality," says Dr. Drury.
too. The statement is a truism, but its
Before the British came to India, application to a system such as the
Indians had one of the finest cul- Quadrangle Plan is easy to forget.
tures and systems of education. We are not fearful that the ad-

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