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October 03, 1929 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-03

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PAGE FOUR THE M CHIGAN

1
DAILY urtTZZ7A, cio~,i r
m }

d
'; (

Published every morning except Mony
ring the University year by the Board in
ntrol of Student Publications.

Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the usc ,for republication af all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwiseecredited
in- this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the posto..ce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Qffices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.'
Phones:.Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF

F
y.
p

Telephone 4925

MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY

Editor.....................George C. Tilley
City Editor................Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor ..............George E. Simons
Sports Editor ........Edward B. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor------------.Marjorie Follmer
Telegraph Editor .........George Stauter
Music' and Drama--------.William 3. Gorman
Literary Editor...........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor....-Robert J. Feldman
Night Editors
Frank E. Cooper Robert L. Sloss
William C. Gentry Gurney Williams, Jr.
Henry 'J. Merry Walter Wilds
Charles R. Kaufman
Reporters

Charles A. Askren
Helen Barc
Louise Behymer
Thomas M. Cooley
W. H. Crane
Ledru E. Davis
Helen Domine
Margaret Eckels
Katherine Ferrin
Carl Forsythe
Sheldon C. Fullerton
Ruth Geddes
Ginevra Ginn
3. Edmrund Glavin
ack Goldsmith
D. B. Hempstead, Jr.
l~ afgs!C. Hendley
ichard T. Hurley
Jean.1H. Levy
Russell E. McCracken
Lster M. May

William Page
Gustav R. Reich
John D. Reindel
Jeannie Roberts
Joe Russell
oseph F. Ruwitch
William P. Salzarulo
George Stauter
Cadwell Swanson
Jane Thayer
Margaret.Thompson
Richard L. Tobin
Beth Valentine
Harold 0. Warren
Charles S. White
G. Lionel Willens
Lionel G. Willens
araaWright
Vivian Zimit

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.

Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertising ......... ...Hollister Mabley
Advertising..........Kasper H. Halverson
Advertising................ Sherwood Upton
Service. ...............George Spater
Circulation. ,........... Vernor Davis
Accounts. ......... ....Jack Rose
Publcations.................George Hamilton
Assistants

Howard W. Baldock
Raymond Campbell
James E. Cartw right
Robert Craw~ford
Harry B. Culver
Thomas M. Davis
James Hoffer'
Norris Johnson
Cullen Kennedy
Charles, Kline
MarvineKobacker
Lawrence Lucey
George Patterson
Norman Eliezer
Anson Hoex

Robert XWilliamson
Thomas Muir
Charles Sanford
Lee Slayton
Roger C. Thorpe
William R. Worboys
Jeanette Dale
Bessie V. Egeland
Bernice Glaser
Helen E. Musselwhite
Hortense Gooding
Eleanor Walkinshaw
Alice McCully
Dorothy Stonehouse
Dorothea Waterman
Marie Wellstead

strument. It is even harder to see
how the council can represent the
students in a controversy with the
administration if at the same time
it is essentially an arm of the
dean's office.
At the present time the students
have no mouthpiece with access to
the ear of the administration. We
feel that a happier spirit would pre-
vail on the campus if the repressed
individualisms of the student body
could be translated from "bull-
session" mutterings into dignified
articulations.
ENDOWED PROFESSORSHIPS.
As universities go, Michigan has
attained an eminently respectable
old age-112 years as some look at
it-let us say at least 92. We have
the hoary tradition, ivy-colored
walls, name writ large in athletic
history, songs commemorating the
halcyon days of yore, huge body of
alumni, rich and poor, and most of
the other attributes of antiquity
that are the glory, pride, and self-
consciousness of communities like
Harvard.
One thing, however, we very con-
spiciously and unfortunately lack.
Michigan has virtually none of the
endowed professorships which do
not necessarily make or break a
faculty, but certainly lend it an
agreeable aura of presitige. They
make it possible for the University
to attract outstanding scholars in
particular fields by offering some-
thing additional in the way of posi-
tion and salary.
Our thoughts naturally turn to
such endowments at this time when
the faculty, depleted by death, re-
tirement, and resignation, could
use some brilliant minds.
It is realized, of course, that
Michigan's status as a state, not an
endowed, institution has quite un-
avoidably done its bit to keep en-
dowed professorships from being
established here. But we are gradu-
ally becoming more than just a
state university living from hand
to mouth on the largess of the
legislature. Buildings, books, ob-
jects of art, and scolarships are
continually being given. It might
be well to propagate the idea
among donors, past and prospec-
tive, that endowed professorships
constitute an immensely valuable,
practical, acceptable, and perpetual
form of gift.
STEVE FARRELL.
It is with mingled feelings of re-
gret and appreciation that we read
of Steve Farrell's intention to re-
sign, as tck coach at the end of
the present college year. Through
Ihis years of service to Michigan-
service crowned with remarkable
success-he has been one of the
most respected and beloved char-
acters whom students have been
privileged to know. His even tem-
per, strict discipline, love of hi
profession, and few but pithy
words have been an inspiration.
At the same time we look for-
ward to the regime of his logical
successor, Charlie Hoyt, who is
strong in the Farrell tradition. As
the old master hands the reins to
his pupil, we can feel assured that
Michigan's destiny on the cinder
path is safe.
0
PAST AND GANN
Ramsay MacDonald's coming
visit to Washington has thrown
our capitol into such a state of

social agitation that arms are in
danger of not getting around to
being limited at all. It seems that
Mrs. Gann, focal point and storm
center of all these etiquette squab-
bles, will not be invited to such
and such a dinner because reasons
of state make it desirable for Se-
cretary Stimson to sit next to the
prime ministerial guest.nThe host-
ess of the affair, with a commend-
able dislike of scenes, evidently
fears that . the vice-president
might rise from the table and blas-
pheme in Choctaw or that Mrs.
Gann might get huffy and go home
to Mr. Gann, whoever he is.
In this connection we have a
few suggestions to make that would
end the difficulty for once and for
all. Why not.arrange the guests
according to the relative import-
ance of the work they do for their
country: the head of the Anti-Sa-
loon league lobby first, Senator
Smoot second, Washington's chief
bootlegger third, Fall, Sinclair, and
Doheny tied for fourth, and so or
down the line. Or seat them ac-
cording to their chest measure-
ment, income tax, or intelligence
quotient. Have a spelling bee: last
man down goes to the head of the
table. Let them pin tails on a
donkey, run a potato race, or fight
it out at ping pong. Do anything
which would establish their order

OED oLL 1
WARNING: HUMOR
.COLUMN s
AHEAD
According to official reports there
are seven less women at the Uni-
versity this year. The Rolls In-
vestigating Bureau probed this
alarming decrease and drew up a
report which was thrown away.
Lark, the genial editor of this
column, wrote seven letters to the
seven less women asking their rea-
sons for not attending school this
year and received six letters arid
a telegram in reply. Two of the
communications will be of interest
to Rolls readers; the other five
were marked "personal" and while
they would no doubt be of great
interest to Rolls followers their
contents have not been divulged
by Lark who, by the way, left sud-
denly for Detroit yesterday. One
letter, we believe, was postmarked
Detroit.
* * *
Sue Perfiuous, of Grand Rapids,
wrote as follows: "Why should I
go to Michigan where they have
auto bans, signing out slips and
Washington blondes? C6mpetition
may be the life of industry but it
cramps my style."
Olga Home, Saginaw, sent a
wire which read: STOP SEND-
ING LETTERS STOP WAS
MARRIED LAST WEEK SEND-
ING PHOTO BY WIRE STOP
IF YOU ARE PLANNING TO
SEE ME NEXT WEEK DONT
STOP
.1
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, -
Unfortunately the _wires were cut
just as the photo was sent and we
1received only part of it.
More than $1,000,000,000 in small-
sized money has been distributed
since July 10. We've doped it out
on our pocket doper that, roughly,
tson in the United States We're
wondering who has ours.
* *1/
1A woman down in Tennessee hic-
coughed for fifty-nine days until
'shie was "syked" out of it by having
her mind diverted by another wor-
ry.s That's not news," stated Os-
scar McBourbon '30, ibelow) when
informed of the phenomenon.

it
('

Despite the predicted downfall
of the legitimate before the on-
slaught of the talking picture, the
current offerings of the new sea-
son as well as the summer's hold-
overs are prospering nicely along
Broadway. Little complaint has
been registered by producers either
as to lowered receipts or a scarcity
of performers, although close to a
dozen talking films are being
shown along the Main Stem at
$2.00 top prices.
Spurred on perhaps by the mys-
tery novel's wave of popularity,
many of New York's new dramas
are besmeared with the blood of
croolr, innocent youths, wicked
women and what not, the mur-
derer's apprehension coming when
and if the playwright seeth fit. One
of the most discussed of these new
thrillers is "Houseparty," depicting
a fraternity week end affair. Writ- I
ten by two Williams alumni, and
openly concerning itself with that
institution of learning, it has been
the subject of attack by loyal
grads, et cetera.
However, during the course of
this fall houseparty, a familiar wo-
man of questionable repute makes
an untimely appearance, demand-
ing a large sum of money from the
central character of the play, an
extremely sensitive youth, who is
unable to meet the request and
likewise ashamed to ask his trust-
ing father. The woman threatens
to inform the assembled guests
dancing in the adjoining rom, but
stumbles in retreating from his
wrath, and is killed when a fire-
place andiron falls on her head.
The next two acts provide many
an exciting moment in the high
strung youth's endeavor to conceal
the body and then his attempt at
suicide. Intelligently acted by a
capable cast headed by co-author
Roy Hargrave, "Houseparty" is con-
vincingly entertaining throughout.
Another bloody melodrama that
has scored a hit is "Remote Con-
trol," with a setting novel to the
stage. The entire action takes
place in a radio broadcasting stu-
dio which is terrorized by Chica-
go's daring Ghost Gang. An old
spiritualist is shot while conduct-
ing a seance over the air in the
dark-something new in the mur-
der line-and from that point the
plot moves fast and furiously to
a plausible finish. Slightly satiri-
cal, decidedly original, and cram-
med with suspense and action, this
thriller is one of the best of the
year.
On the tuneful side of the ledger
there is an abundance of musical
hits added up to Broadway's credit.
Foremost among the new "revusi-
cals" is Murray Anderson's "Al-
manac," a pleasing concoction of
skits, songs, and pretty misses, to
say nothing of little Jimmie Savo,
who's a whole show in hinVelf.
Trixie Friganza of vaudeville fame
is also in the revue, but doesn't go
over so big-not in size but quality.
Magician Fred Keating serves as a
humorous and likeable master of
ceremonies and is an important:
factor in keeping the Almanac
thoroughly interesting and un-
hackneyed. Altogether, it marks
a new note in revue production and
should not be missed by the New
York visitor.
Of the older musicals, "Hot
Chocolates," a sizzling tan-skin re-
vue, still remains as a fitting suc-

cessor to the famous Blackbirds.
Baby Cox, a fast stepping seven-
teen year old dancer and singer,
"Jazzlips" Richardson, an eccentric
stepper of merit, and Comedian
Eddie Green are the outstanding
dark spot, of the show. Two cho-
ruses, one of eight six foot
colored boys, and the other of six-
teen tan misses, display some of
the best dancing ever seen along
Mazda Lane. Little wonder that
"Hot Chocolates" has been on for
eight months and still going strong.
ORGAN RECITAL
A Review by Margaret Thompson
Palier Christian, Univeristy Or-
ganist, gave the first concert of the
Twilight Organ Recital Series yes-
terday afternoon at 4:15 o'clock in
Hill Auditorium. An enthusiastic
audience of old admirers and many
new students greeted Mr. Chris-
tian. The program was skillfully
arranged, opening with a Concert
Overture in C Major by Hollins.
'An exquisite nocturne by Grieg
arranged for the organ by Mr.
Christian followed. In contrast to
the soothing liquid tones of the

I

Music And Drama

11

O~

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By Bert Askwith

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Night Editor-ROBERT L. SLOSS
THURSDAY,-OCTOBER 3, 1929
LET THE MUTTERINGS
BE HEARD
The Student council, never a
very potent force in the local stu-
dent life, has come to be regarded
as earning its salt if it completes a
year's routine of class games, class
elections, convocations, and a Cap
Night and cheering section or two
without any particularly noticeable
blunders. With the rest of its time
it convenes, talks, nicks the tax-
payers for a gold charm, and ad-
journs, scarcely causing a ripple in
the ebb and flow of student
thought and opinion. At that it
does better than the student coun-
cils of some universities that dig-
nify their elevation to office withf
ak banquet and celebrate the con-
clusion of a year's inactivity withl
another.
But our council has completely
missed its real and vital function
of interpreting student opinion to
the administrative heads of the
,University. Through the years it
has become so completely a bodyI
for the execution of routine mat-
ters that ideas about student afflic-
tions, their cause and cure, have
ceased to brighten its chambers.
The resulting impotency has natur-
ally discouraged petitions for re-
dress of grievances which students
might circulate if there were for
such petitions a designated and in-
terested destination.
The chief causes of the council's
deficiency seem to be two, and the
first of these is campus politics.
Expediency as seen by the execu-
tive committees of the party cau-
cuses (if we can dignify the hap-
hazard process with such circum-
stantial terms) dictates the nom-
inees, who thereupon ride into of-
fice without taking a stand on any-
thing or being known to any one
outside the inner circle. To call a
council of such puppets the repre-
sentatives of the student body is
preprosterous; they represent little
or anything except the. gratifica-
tion of their own vanities.
The other obstacle the council
must hurdle in its rise to useful-
ness is its own constitution which

at the
Student S p l tr
1111 South University
One-Half Block from the Campus

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4

MICHIGAN BELL

"I've often spent a week end
in Windsor hiccoughing and
have found a Monday morn-
ing psychology lecture excel-
lent in aiding me back to nor-
malcy."
* * *
Angus Baker, a London engineer
offers the following cure for in-
somnia. "Form a mental picture
of a tetrahedron, a solid figure en-
closed by four triangles. Then vis-
ualize four lines passing from the
four corners and meeting at the
center. If you do not then lose
consciousness, there is something
wrong with your geometry."
* * *
A lot of gents around here
know of better plans. Theyj
don't have to visualize any-
thing; all they do is sign a
little card and then show up
on MWF for an hour. At the
end of the semester they are
given an E grade which means
cured.
* * *
Have you subscribed to The Daily,
Gargoyle, 'Ensian, and the Inlan-
der; bought extra football tickets
and all your text books? If so,j

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