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December 03, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-12-03

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1 to 04-LZ T, t;a .tr, :1, iumn,

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

~ui~jTh\T, C~T'siEi~ 3, ~ยง29 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

COU9RTIS TO SPEAK
AT CAMPU FRUM

'Fact and Fancy in Religion'
Topic to be Discussed
by Educator.

Is,

TO USE QUESTIONAIRES
Using as his subject "Fact and
Fancy in Religion." Prof. S. A. Cour-
tis of the School of Education, will,
be the speaker at the sixth of a
series of All-campushForums, at 4
o'clock tomorrow, in Room D,
Alumni Memorial hall.
The fact that this is of a differ-
ent nature than any discussed at
preceeding Forums is expected to
arouse more than ordinary interest.
In order to facilitate questioning
the points to be discussed, Professor
Courtis has prepared a questionaire
which was distributed at last
week's Forum and which will be
passed out to the audience tomor-
row. In this way those attending
will be given the opportunity of
forming their own ideas on this
subject.
Among the questions Professor'
Courtis will incorporate into his di's-
cussion following a short introduc-
tory presentation of the subject,
are: "What is the place of religion
among the major issues of life?
How do you define religion,-are
there "supernatural" aspects to it?
What are the rewards of adopting a
religious life? and what is your
program for religious develop-
ment?"
Because the question of religion
is considered one of the outstand-'
ing problems of the present day,
considerable discussion is expected
to be forthcoming at the meeting
tomorrow.

SCREEN FIVE BOOTLEGGERS
REFLECTIONS
Locally. ______
"Widecombe Fair," a reputed Federal Agents From Boston
British cinema of note at the Men- A
delssohn, is reviewed in this morn- Conduct Numerous
ing's Music and Drama column. Campus Raids.
"On Trial," the first of the court- -
room epics arriving at the Wuerth STUDENTS AID .FFICERS
rather late, is considered below. STUDENTSA OFFICERS
Both the Majestic and Michigan !(Ty Associated Press)
programs are running for the en' B TO . 2 -ceg r
tire week. BOSTON, Dec. 2 - Bootleggers
have become a pest at Harvard, in
the opinion of Maj. Henry E. Good-
What Say Ye, Jury? nough, assistant administrator of
When the state's attorney main- prohibition enforcement for New7
twins that the prisoner is guilty of England.
murder, and when the prisoner al- After raids by federal agents and
so maintains that he is guilty, Boston police over the week end,'
what can be done by the young during which five arrests were
defense attorney appointed by the made, Maj. Goodnough said thaty
court? In the solution of that ques- tips for the arrest of two men
tion lies the reason for the great "might have come" from Harvard
amount of suspense found in "On!students. He denied that studentsj
Trial," at the Wuerth. Iwere being used as paid informers,7
The action arises from the eter-'and added that any information
nal feminine losing her pocket-, from undergraduates had come vol-
book and ends after a hice bit of untarily.
expert testimony by a doctor. Paul- Six students are known to have
ine Frederick is billed as the star visited Maj. Goodnough last Fri- {
and does excellently in the film day. The next day two men were
footage she is apportioned. How- arrested near the college yard after
ever, Bert Lytell and Lois Wilson they had received $135 in marked
are given the greater number of money given them by two young
scenes and enact them in an un- men in exchange for a case of
scsan inent theman hun whisky. The bootleggers pleaded
usually intelligent and human with the officers to release the
manner. This is one time in which young men, saying they were in-
an all-star cast consists of an nocent.
actually well-known group of The young men were released,
actors. Its only drawback is the but later they and four others met
absence of a comedian. the federal agents again. Clad in
Accompanying the feature are two fur coats and spats, they accom-
newsreels, one silent and one panied the raiders and visited near-
sound, and a movietone act of two ly a dozen places here, . during
girls singing three popular songs which three more arrests were
in good "sister" harmony style. made and evidence was collected.

MICHIGAN RECLAIMS FIFTY-SIX
WAR DEAD AFTER ELEVEN

YEARS

(By Asociatcd Prei Vn blankets, their comrades whis-
DETROIT, Dec. 2.--Michigan re- tling taps through lips blue with
claimed the last of her sons whosn
t ;'cold. Others. whose bodicys fell into
died in the World war Stmnday. the hands of the enmy, were in-
The state and the nation bowed
as the bodies of 56 men came home terred in trene grave. stripped
from the frozen tundra waste in of clothing and identification
which they died 11 years ago. marks.
They were the final mute detach- *Lack of diplomtic relations be-
ment from the most unique and tween the United States and Russia
ifolated front of the World war. prevented the grave registration
In the furious fighting and the rig- service, which recovered thousands
orous climate of north Russia in of bodies in France, from conc en-j
1918 and 1919, a regiment of Amer- tracing the Russian deceased. Last'
ican infantry held a line longer summer unofficial sanction was giv-
than the western front. en the comrades of the dead to re-
Beset constantly by hordes of# move their bodies. The Michigan
Bolsheviki, 226 lost their lives. Most legislature appropriated funds and
of them were from Michigan. The7 a commission was sent to the oicf
239th infantry, fighting under the battlefield. All but 19 bodies are
insignia of the Polar Bear, was accounted for.
known as Detroit's Own. When hos- Seventy-five were returned to
tilities ceased half of the dead were this country. Others were buried in
returned to the homeland. France. Fifty-six, including 26 thus
Sunday the rest came back. For far unidentified individually, al-
11 years they slept in desolate though their names as a group are
swamp graves. Many were buried known, will remain in a specially
Kodaks and Cameras in
cors makidala Xmas
Gifts.
*i
Francisco-Boyce Photo Co.
719 North University
OPLEN E VZEiNGS

designed national cemetery in De- etery was a barnyard. In another
troit guarded by a massive white peasonts were harvesting crops
Polar Bear on a black shaft. The above the bodies.Pitiful mounds In
remainder were claimed by rei- s amps, vhich were found only
tives. through maps and the help of na-
The commission which located tives, because they were twins to
the graves after more than a decade millions of moss hummocks which
of neglect found them over-run infest the tundra, were without
with weeds. In one so-called cem- markers or care.

REENE'S

PRE-XMAS
SPECIAL
Through Dec. 7th
For Extra Garment

i

LONG
COATS
DRESSES
SUITS
DRESSES OVER 20 PLEATS, FORMALS AND VELVETS
A TRIFLE EXTRA.
CLEANS A
7'&#5c 2""5c
TOPCOAT $
OVERCOAT

I

Let Us Do Your
Shoe Repairing
Highest Quality
of Work
A. T. COOCH t
& SON
1109 South University
Half Block From Campus

$25.00 for any
lost Key I can't
Replace.

A. REAL'S SERVICE CAR
"FIXALL"
Is the same low rate as
work brought to my Repair
Shop.. Open 7 A. M. to 9
P. M.

I

$25.00 REWARD
For any article worth repairing that I can't repair and make as strong
or stronger than new.
Free repair for any item that I can't name its occupation.
I want the repair work that others turn down. One trial will win
your everlasting confidence.
Keys manufactured from the first one to the last. Reduced rates
in quantities. Get my prices for Faculties, Fraternities and Sororities.
Keys for your auto, your apartment, homes, stores, offices, trunks,
mail boxes, suitcases, hand bags, vanity cases, desks drawers, lockers, pad-
locks, etc.
A. REAL,
Master Mechanic
440 South State Phone 9200

I

CASH ONLY
CALLING AND DELIVERING

23231-Phone-23231

702 S. State St.

I

516 E. Liberty

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...: ... .. .. .. .. --...--..... -- -
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21-

It

4-10

r;

-a

" here's

danger underfoot!

UP

FROM tTHE

OXCART

r

"Acceleration, rather than structural changes, is the key
to an understanding of our recent economic develop-
ments."-Prom the report of President Hoover's
Committee on Recent Economic Changes

' ': +:Ti.' FOOT"is everywhere

JOINS US I THE GENERAL
ELECTRIC HOUR, BROADCAST i
EVERY SATURDAY AT 9 P.M.,
E.S.T. ON A NATION-WIDE
N.B.C. NET WORK
GE ERA

ESTERDA X the rumble, creak, and plod of cart and
oxen. To-day and to-morrow the zoom of airplanes. Faster
production. Faster consumption. Faster communication.
Significant of electricity's part in the modern speeding-up
process is the fact that during the last seven years, con-
sumption of electric power increased three and one-half
times as fast as population.
General Electric and its subsidiaries have developed and
built much of the larger apparatus that generates this power
as well as the apparatus which utilizes it in industry and in

More than 50'o of the students of some colleges
have this iching, smartig ringworm parasite
of the feet!
ft's so easy to pick up! The locker-room and
gym floors are full of it! So are the edges of the
pool! So are the showers! ft's practically always
underfoot.
Watch for redness at the toe bases and along
the outer edge of the feet. Look for cracks be-
t ween the toes or tiny, itching blisters. See if the

Absorbine Jr. kills the " Athlete's Foot" germ
Keep an extra bottle in your locker. Douse it on
after every exposure. It'll do the trick. ICl1 helpkill
the germ if you already have it - it'll keep you
from catching it if you're one of the lucky 40%.
And, of course, you know that for years
thousands have found Absorbine Jr. In-
equalled for sore muscles, aches and
sprains, bruises, burns, cuts and abra-
sions. Always have a bottle handy.

I

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