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November 20, 1929 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-11-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

W-FMMT)AV-~ , It M C -I AN D IYY fl.'~4hJJ* W017- fl~*tt

THE MTCHTAN

D A I L

YV S:i2.l AV Y!ri"r.31t1 3 4YV 5! . Vr e. i9.u'i]

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VISITS OF HEAL[TH!"~lfS~
SERllE INCREASED
SINCEL LASd byTER
Room Calls Increased by Twenty

Yale Professor Heads.
Arts and Letters Body

WILL HOLD CONTESTI
IN CURRENT EVENTS
New York Times Annual Cur-
rent Events Contest to be
Held in March.

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Six Compared to Same Period s<1930 MARKS FIFTH YEAR,
Last October. _
------March 4 or 5 is the tentative dateE
DOES BENEFICIAL WORK set for the New York Times annual
--'Current Events contest, as an-
Dispensary Calls Increased by f.nounced yesterday by Prof. J. L.
Eleven Per Cent Over . Brunim of the journalism depart-
Last October I'ment. Last year, a student at Am-
/1,herst college won the first prize of
According to the October report $500. Over 20 leading universities
of the University Health Service * a nd colleges of the United StatesI
issued yesterday by Warren E. For- participated in the event. Besides
sythe, M. D., director, the depart--P the intercollegiate prize of $500,
ment is doing a service which is in- Professor at 'Yale who was re- there were several medalists or first
creasingly satisfactory and benefic- cently elected president of the prize winners. Among these, Orsa-
lal to the student body as evidenced Amercan Institute of Arts and Let- Imus M. Pearl, '33A., was the Uni-
by the increase in the dispensary ters at the annual meeting held in versity of Michigan's representa-
visits this October over the total for New York. tive, winning $150. Victor Rabino-
th s Octobeon er etao.-witz, '31, and Allan R. Moore, '29,
th1 same month a year ago. were also recipients of smaller
Mumps Epidmcic Averted. H;11prizes.#
An increase inmumps was the AlexanderL. Milch, of Newark,
only unusual situation observed N. J., represented Amherst college,
during the past month, a situation was the intercollegiate prize winner. I
whic ha. eery ndiatin o be-5'0 H' C 0 M TT[ 9 ,Louis Stern of Rochester, N. Y., at-
coing han eindic atoneoftim-tending Williams college and Orrin;
I Pnom ChamrmanoGoes to~~ngine H. Clark of Columbia university
but did not mature as a result of Prom Chairman Goes to Engine were listed as the rumiers-up.
the clinic in its preventative meas- School Class This Year; I The first of these current eventsI
ures to eliminate the source of;I contests sponsored by the New York
contagion. All cases of the sick- Buchan Chosen. Times was held in 1926, and was
ness which could be traced were -won by a Harvard student. Prince-
immediately given attention and (Continued From Page 1) ton captured the prize in 1927 and1
isolated and consequently did not Advisory-James F. Sheahan, 1928.
break out in such proportion as to chairman; George Herr, Kennetht
warrant a general quarantine. Sandy, Robert Goldstein, ByronDu ham o pee
The sensitization tests listed be- Dalyrimple, Vincent Nash,BIra D un Completes
low are time consuming skin tests Grinell, Karl Hirt, Norma Brown, C
conducted by the series in which Mary Elizabeth Dunn, Ben Frankel New Commerce Book
a study was made of the reaction and Gladys Icheldinger.__
of two hundred foreign substances Executive-Edward - J. McMor- Prof A. L. Dunham of the De-
such as plant pollens, animal epi- mick, c'hairman; Hobart D. Skid- partment of History has completed
dermals, foods, etc., on the human # more, John Duffield, Howard Gould, a 500-page book on "The Anglo-
body. - Frank Baker, Kenneth McCallum, French Treaty of Commerce of1
Statistics Given. Henry Bergstrom, Alfred Palmer 1816," it was announced yesterday.
The following statistics give the and Harry Cook.. The wnrk is to be nublished by h It
S~kt .v.J~a.,JV'S S-y the

Mother of Polar Explorer Sends Greetings
to Son Now Exploring South Polar Regions
............
" ; }
v "
S~ i
Associated J'resS Photo
Mrs. Richard Evelyn Byrd, Sr.,
Mother of Commander Richard E. Byrd, polar explorer, sends
greetings by radio to her son who is encamped very near the south
pole. Gov. Harry Flood Byrd, of Virginia, another son, stands behind
Mrs. Byrd.

Art Club Members
Inspect Art Studio
Members of the Art club met last
night at the studios of Avard Fair-
banks, associate professor of sculp-
tore, on the fourth floor of Univer-
sity hall, where they were initiated
into the various process of sculp-
ture.
Professor Fairbanks demonstrat-
Cd the method of modeling a head
on a steel armature. He showed the
students the preliminary clay model
of a fountain group that he has
submitted as a background for a
statue of a former president of the
Hawaiian islands.
Students were shown a model in
the formative process of- the head
of Professor Fairbank's oldest son.
Photographs of works Professor
Fairbanks has sculptured during
the past few years were shown.

facts for October, 1928 and 1929.

OctoberI
Dispensary calls .......
Infirmary patients ......
Hospital patients .......
Room calls .,..... .
Refractions ............
Upper respiratory in-
fections ..............
dontagions ............- .
(14 mumps)
-ray examinations.
Prescriptions. filed... .
Protein sensitization
tests-..............

1928
6589
139
22
126
162
796
2

1929
7439
138,
38
152
156
955
16

244 360
857 1300
17 35

Hutchins, 30 Year Old GraduateI
of Yale, is Youngest Eve
to Hold Office.

Woman's - Dorothy Ellsworth,
chairman; Margaret Thompson,
Helen Aulph, Dorothy Sample,
Hilda Mendelson, Virginia Olds,
Helen Carrm, Josephine Conviser,
and Emma Townsend.
Publicity-William Page, chair-
man; John Denler, Thomas Don-
nelly, Carl Forsythe, Harvey Balch,
Charles Sprowl, William Harris,
Daniel Boone, Emmett Egad, Rob-
ert; Crawford, Paul Erwin, and
Joseph Frank..
Finance-Edward Muir, chair-
man; Stanley E. Betz, Harriet Ad-
ams, Betty Smith, Daniel Blumer,
Albert Baker, Harcourt Batterson,
Maurine Kook, Florence Taylor,
Oscar Lundin, Frank Bessinger,
Samuel o~ils, and Don McDonald.
Athletic-Robert Clark, chair-
man, Thomas Roach, Norman Dan-
iels, Charles .Seda, Maynard Morri-
son, James Harris, Edward Hayden,
Sidney Raike, Emmett O'Neill,
Walter P. Stern.
Auditing-William, Kearns chair-
man; Elias Miller, Robert O'Brien,
Carlton VanWagoner, Joseph Stab-
nick, Art Goudy, Lawrence Rahilly,
Robert Amberg, Gustave R. Reich,
Paul Heddon, William Larson, and
Walter Lean.
DEAN SADLER HONORED
Dean Herbert C. Sadler of the en-
gineering college was named hon-
orary vice president of the Society
of Naval Architects and Marine
Engineers at the annual meeting of
the society held in'New York last
week.

University Press, and will go on
sale at the beginning ot next
month.
The book, according to Professor
Dunham, is a study in secret di-
plomacy and a discussion of the
only treaty in international history
to have been made by economists
only. The latter portion of the vol-
ume reviews the effect of the treaty
on the industrial revolution then
extant in France.
Months of original research have
been spent in preparing the book,I
since it is inade up entirely of ma-
terial obtained from hitherto un-
published documents. As a feature
of interest, many family papers of
Gladstone appear for the frst time
in the historical work.

COLLECTION OF TRANSPORTATION
VOLUMES DIRECTED BY WORLEY
Probably the only collection of formed Professor Worley concern-.
books, magazines, and reports in ing them.
the country relating to the field of Many of the papers in the library
transportation is located at the li- contain valuable information about
brary in the office of Prof. John the lives of pioneers in the building
S. Worley, of the engineering of canals, highways, airplanes, au-
transportation department. tomobiles, and ships. A book con-
The library contains a large num- taming colored prints of the first
ber of papers, books, pictures, doc- railroad in England is one of the
uments, and reports all of which most valuable in the collection.
make possible a complete study of Many interesting facts about the
the development of the field of life of Robert Fulton, inventor of
transportation. The collection of the steamboat, have been brought
these volumes is directed by Pro- to light through a collection of the
fessor Worley, and each week he re- papers which were written during
ceives interesting books from vari- his life, and several books have
ous foreign countries, as well as been found that were written by
from numerous book sellers Fulton himself.
throughout the Unite d States. Professor Worley pointed out that
"Book dealers -for the most part Fulton, while in England, invented
are very interesting men," said Pro- a submarine that carried a large
arever ineretig mn, aidPro ,number of men, and on several oc-
fessor Worley, "and they are usu-ionmbesmenedbon ser-
ally interested in such collections casions descended below the sur-
as we have here in Michigan. Many ace.
of them send us books that they
think willefitinto the collection." ALPHA NU MEETS
Professor Worley has recently re- . ---
turned from Chicago where he pur- "Big Business" was the subject
chased some valuable documents of an open forum at the regular
and annual reports of railroads. weekly meeting 6f Alpha Nu, cam-
*The books were formerly owned by, pus debating society, in the Alpha
a well-known writer in the field of Nu rooms last night. Various ,
engineering, and were sold at a phases of modern industry were
low price to a bookseller who in- discussed at the meeting.

TERMS
To Suit!
Play While You Pay

601

4

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._ _ __

CHAPELJ

INAUGURATION

(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Nov. 19.-Robert May-
nard Hutchins became today, . at
the age of 30, the fifth president of
University of Chicago.
Inauguration of this tall, almost
boyish younb man was made bril-
liant by the attendance of repre-
senatives from 300 colleges and
universities not only in the United
States but in Canada and Europe
as well. One hundred and twenty-
five of them were presidents of the
schools they represented.
Some came from the largest and
proudest schools of higher learn-
ing the world; but none among
them was so proud as William J.
Hutchins, president of Berea col-
lege, Ky., for it was his son who was
being honored.
Yale' university gave to Univer-
sity of Chicago its first president 38
years ago when William Rainey
Harper was inaugurated; and it is
from Yale that Dr. Hutchins has
come to the quadrangles on the
midway.
Today, too, Yale sent its presi-
dent, James Rowland Angell, to
bring greetings to its former law
school dean.
The inaugural services in the uni-
versity chapel were held at 11 a. im.,
designated as the 157th convocation
of the university.

The MICHIGAN SODA GRILL
(Formerly Maxroy)
4nnounces
ITS GRAND OPENING
on Thursday, Nov.21
With a complete line of Box and Home
Made Candies
Hot and Cold Lunches
"Flowers to the Ladies"
601 East Liberty St.

TYPEWRITERS
RIBBQNS
SUPPLIES
for all makes of
Typewriters.
Rapid turnover, fresh stock, insures
best quality at a moderate price.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615

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CAmleaned& (5se~d
"Cash
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carry"
WTHERE can you get as good work for less money?
Nowhere in the world. Some place, in another
state perhaps, there may be lower prices. But nowhere
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Then let us demonstrate'our Filter-Vac System just installed!
That will prove it!
LAUNDRY COMPANY

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SAWYLERS

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REFRESHMENT.
The rest of us are more
fortunate. Wecan take our
pauses as we want them.
And to refresh us, Coca-
Cola is ready, ice-cold,
around the corner from
anywhere. The whole-
some refreshment of this
pure drink of natural fla-
vors makes any little
miniitep lorng inoruiah fp, a

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