100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 02, 1929 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t:

PAGE FOUR

THE MIC'L GA"N

DAILY

J74 I-T

PAGE 1~O13fl WEDNE~UAY, b BflF~'C'2, .~13'~?

Published every morning except Monay
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the posto..ce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.

EDITORIAL STAFF

I

Telephone 4925

MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY
Editor .....................George C. Tilley
Ntws Editor...............eorge E. Simons
City Editor.........Pierce Rosenberg
Sports Editor.......Edward B. Warner, Jr.
Women's' Editor ............Marjorie Follmer
Telegraph Editor......... George Stauter
Music and Drama ........ William J. Gorman
Literary Editor...........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor....-Robert J. Feldman

Nigh
Frank E. Cooper
William C. Gentry
Henry J. Merry
Charles
Re'
Charles A. Askren
Helen Barc
Louise Behymer
Thomas M. Cooley
W. H. Cranm
Ledru E. Davis
Helen Domine
Margaret Eckels
Katherine Ferrin
Carl Forsythe
Sheldon C. Fullerton
Ruth Geddes
Ginevra Ginn
J.Edmund Glavin
ack Goldsmith
D. B. Hempstead, Jr.
James C. Hendley
Richard T. Hurley
Jean H. Levy
Russell E. McCracke
Lester M. May

t Editors
Robert L. Sloss
Gurney Williams, Jr.
Walter Wilds
R. Kaufman
porters
William Page
Gustav R. Reich
Gohn D. Reindel
eannie Roberts
Joe Russell
Joseph F. Ruwitch
William P. Salzarulo
George Stauter
(adwell Swanson
Jane Thayer
Margaret Thompson
Richard L. Tobin
Beth Valentine
Harold O. Warren
Charles S. White
G.hLionel Willens
Lionel G. Willens
araaWright
n Vivian Zimit

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
# ALEX K. SCHERER
Department Managers
Advertisig...............Hollister Mabley
Advertising..... ......Kasper H. Halverson
,Advertising .........Sherwood Upton
Service ......... .George Spater
Cix ulation. ..J. Vernor Davis
Accounts........... ,..... ..... Jack Rose
Publications ...... .......eorge Hamilton

Assistants

Howard W. Baldock
Raymond Campbell
Jams E. Cartwright
Robert Crawford
Harry' B: Culver
Thomas M. Davis
James, Hoffer
Norris Johnson
Cullen Kennedy
"Charles Kline
Marvin Kobacker
Lawrence. Lucey
George Patterson
Norman'"Eliezer
Anson Hoex

Robert Williamson
Thomas Muir
Charles Sanford
Lee Slayton
Roger C. Thorpe
Jeanette Dale
Bessie V.1 Egeland
Bernice laser
Helen E. Musselwhite
Hortense Gooding
Eleanor Walkinshaw
Alice McCully
Dorothy Stonehouse
Dorothea Waterman
Marie Wellstead

be well if the Alumnae association
when the time comes, publicly and
energetically sponsored for nomin-
ation some logical successor to Mrs.
Cram as was done by an interested
group of alumni in the recent elec-
tion of Regent R. Perry Shorts..1
REDUCE WAR BREEDERS
High tariffs levied by one coun-
try and the resulting retaliatory
tariff wall built up by other coun-
tries have long been war breeders.
The recommendation by British
and French delegates to the League
of Nations that an international
economic conference be called for
the purpose of lowering these bar-
riers is a huge step toward the
promotion of world harmony and
understanding, which, in its ulti-
mate aspects, is no less important
than the present movement for the
limitaiton of armaments.
Thinking persons in every na-
tion of the world are rapidly real-
izing that heavy duties form a
terrific hindrance to trade. As no
country is entirely independent of
the rest of the world for its goods,
none can afford to cut themselves
off by the imposition of unreason-
able duties. The efforts of war-
torn Europe to stage a "comeback"
in economic affairs are often pro-
hibited by just such a situation.
Not only are tariffs war breeders,
but they propagate national ha-
treds and jealousies without ac-
complishing any of the purposes
for which they are levied: namely
the protection of home industry.
Unable to sell goods profitably, a
powerful nation will probably at-
tempt to find new sources for raw
materials and better markets in
which to sell the manufactured
product. Both may have to be won
by force of arms, or at least by
military threat.
Any plan for the reduction of
high tariff barriers which have
hampered the states of the world
for so long should be looked on
with great favor by all. The pro-
cess will undoubtedly be slow, but
generally increased prosperity is
certain to result.
WHY PICK ON ONE?
With a vigor characteristic of its
many inquiries, the Senate,'
through its Naval Affairs commit-
tee is investigating the alleged big
navy propaganding of. William B.
Shearer. Shearer, reports say, dis-
rupted disarmament progress at
the unsuccessful Geneva naval
conference in 1927, while in the
employ of American shipbuilders.
Though proceeding with vigor,
the Senate investigators are lacking
in vision. They are concerned pri-
marily with personal qualities of
the defendant and with only the
particular incident at hand. They
have failed to grasp the real sig-
nificance of the situation.
The Shearer case is important
because it has aired the type of
activities performed by that large
body of pests that swarm about
legislative assemblies, the lobbyists.
Warned by the harmful work of
this one "professional legislative
agent" the Senate should investi-
gate the whole army of lobbyists,
from those of the Anti-Saloon
league on up.
Better than the Senate, the Ex-
ecutive should act. President Hoo-
ver's staunch denouncement of the
Shearer-shipbuilder partnership

when -it first came to light, indi-
cated that he was to profit by the
Woodrow Wilson manner of hurl-
ing broadsides at the lobbyists. But,
apparently the Hoover gun can
stand but one shot, and the re-
mainder of the "experts" will con-
tinue to distort legislative acts.
Washington should use its en-
ergy now devoted to digging into
personal records of Shearer and
details of the Geneva incident, for
sweeping up the lobby generally.
Its act would then be more con-
ducive to good government.
o
At Butler University last Satur-
day scores of pretty co-eds joined
in a snake dance and paraded the
gridiron between halves wearing
blue berets. If that's news it must
have been the berets.
Reformed pickpockets and safe-
crackers are to lecture at the
school of police administration at
the University of Chicago. Sounds
like a lead pipe course.
Complete management of the
West Virginia University cafeteria
has been undertaken by the home
economics department whose stu-
dents, under the direction of their
instructors, will do everything but
the actual labor involved. Sounds
miVP fn-.ih 4rhi nhwhe rn l n via

10
About Books I Music And Drama
0k0

11ae

THE LOW-DOWN ON PRINCETONE
In Princeton Town, by Day Edgar
Charles Scribner's Sons, N. Y. C. P
Price $2.00. Publication date Oct. 4.S
* * *
Middle Western undergraduates, n
a thousand manly miles farthere
west, will look aghast at the fol-
lowing quotation from Day Edgar's
In Princeton Town, which will be I
on sale at the book stores Fri- c
day.
"The door burst open to admit
Jempson with a yellow leather casef
shaped like a tumbler. From the)
case Jempson produced three sil-
ver mugs. These, Barber observed
admiringly, bore the engraved in-I
itials of their owner. The mugs
were filled from the quart bottlet
of milk, the second bag yielded at
supply of bacon buns; and theI
three men, between sips and bites,
completed plans for an early des-
cent upon the night life of New
York."
A Farewell To Arms, by Ernest;
Hemingway,. Charles Scribner's
Sons, N. Y. C. Price $2.50.
Much has been written concern-;
ing Mr. Hemingway's "rhythmic"''
dialogue and his crisp, objective
style. This technique, however no-
vel and experimental it may be,,
and however hard it may pound
the reader into emotion, fons
dangerous ground for the novelist'
to tread. Mr. Hemingway's style,
which upon reading must be ad-
mitted to be staccato rather than
rhythmic, entirely devoid of intro-
spection and subjective treatment'
of characters as ', is, stands in
closer relation to that of the drama
than of anything else. In fact it
has frequently been thought and
recorded that his short stories in
the volume called Men Without
Women would find their rightfulj
place dressed in the technique of
one-act plays.
This in itself would be an al-
lowable and even commendable
method, could its success be count-
ed in terms of effect. But in fol-
lowing the theatre as closely as he
does, Hemingway forsakes any ap-
peal to the intellect. The staccato
effect of his prose plays havoc with I
the senses, but falls short of de-
sired effect in so far as the de-
lineation of character is concern- I
ed, and delineation of character to
the novelist - to any novelist -
should be paramount. The Hem-
ingway insistence of merely re-
cording what people say and do,
and'avoiding the subjective, leaves
the reader with only sensory re-
actions and, more than that, the
characters unreal; unseasoned, and
lacking that intellectual acquaint-
ance with the reader. Hence, in
the characters are at the end un-
known and unknowable.
The method is not a short-com-
ing on the part of Mr.- Heming-
way. He is too consistent in his
technique for that. It does not
mean that Mr. Hemingway is a
bad writer; it means merely that
his experiment fails.
A Farewell To Arms tells the tale
of an expatriate American in the
medical corps of the Italian army
and his love for an English nurse.
It is a rather monotonous story.
It is monotonously rainy in the
setting, the hero is monotously
drunk and amorous, and the pyg-
my sentences are monotonously
short. But the redundant style of
the author must of necessity be
monotonous. Withal, there are de-
scriptive passages of harsh fighting
and living that merit nothing but
honest commendation. The author

time after time makes a situation
keenly felt anaI lived by the reader
with passages that abound with
reality.
L. R. K.
APOLOGIA
The policy of the Books Col-
umn of The Daily, published in this
space two or three times during the
week, will be quite simple and un-
involved. The attempt on the part
of the literary editor will be to
place before the student body and
the faculty announcements and re-
views of books which should be
called to the attention of a uni-
versity town reading public. Books
that are judged to be beyond the
simple limits of the literary edi-
tor's intelligence, or, more often,
technical or scientific knowledge,
will be rescued for review by spec-
ialists on the faculty. It is the lit-
erary editor's sincere wish that
those people asked to aid in an
intelligence upkeep of this column
will respond with good will.
The following is a list, published
by Brentano's, of the best sellers
of the week:

DETROIT THIS WEEK: At the n
Wilson: New York Theatre Guild
presentation of George Bernard
Shaw's "Pygmalion."t
Cass: Katharine Cornell in a dra-
matization of Edith Wharton's nov-
el of the mauve decade, "The Age
of Innocence." t
Detroit Civic Theatre: Jessie
Bonstelle presents an entire new
company in A. A. Milne's charming
comedy "Meet the Prince."
Lafayette: William A. Grew's
farce-comedy "My Girl Friday."
* * *
KATHARINE CORNELL
Only very rarely does America
know the glamour of a stage per-
sonality, a personality that appeals
to all types of audience with even
the slightest play, a personality
like those numerous ones of the
nineteenth century English stage
which Lamb and Hazlitt and Lewes
so glowingly celebrated. Perhaps
it 4s that American productions are
more honest and endeavour to
avoid the exploitation of person-
ality; though that is very, very dif-
ficult to believe. It is more prob-
able that America just hasn't de-
veloped those magnificent creatures
that always thrill.
Katharine Cornell, though, looks
very much like one. Her vehicles
have nearly always been somewhat
stupid parts in very questionable
dramas, yet her popularity is enor-
mous. She began at the age of
nineteen, i the title role of that
all too heavenly drama "Seventh
Heaven." Another typical role was
Kiki. Someyears ago .she gave an.
emotional banquet to her then ar-
dent admirers as Iris March in
"The Green Hat."
Her admirers have grown so nu-
merous that .now her dramas are
very carefully chosen so that she
may never disappoint, a somewhat
questionable peak of artistry to
perch upon, but nevertheless a
peak.
Her latest manufactured vehicle
is "the Age o Innocence." It is an
adaptation by Margaret Ayer
Barnes of Edith Wharton's reveal-
ing and forierly shocking novel.
The play reolves around a love tri-
angle-a triangle in the 90's, not
near as simple and obvious as a
twentieth century one and far more
absorbing because less indecent -
even if that does sound theatrically
paradoxical. Countess Olenska,
fleeing from a dissolute and b'rutal
husband of the Polish nobility lands
in her search for refuge into a
- smug, conventional circle of very
blue-blooded Puritans, cautious of
Ispeech and emotions. A young
k comfortable lawyer who already has
a lovely and rich fiancee son be-
comes a disturbing factor in her
life. The result is of course, love--
love in the 90's presenting a more
delightful spectacle on the stage
than a twentieth century love af-
fair because of the fine gestures
and swooping bends that it called
forth.
That should be enough. The
Countess with European freedom
of speech and action dominas
our ancestors from the Mayflower.
Those who like glamour and act-
ing will want to see Miss Cor-
nell's Countess. It is sure to be
vivid.
W.J. G.
, , * * *
RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University or-
ganist, is beginning this afternoon
his annual series of concerts in
Hill Auditorium. In previous in-
terviews Mr. Christian has declared

his purpose to be primarily edu-
cational and those seriously inter-
ested in music have taken advan-
tage of the opportunity he affords
for a comparatively wide glance at
organ repertoire. Mr. Christian's
first program follows:
Hollins: Concert Overture in C
Major.
Grieg-Christian: Nocturne
Widor: Allegro (Symphony No. 6)
Corelli: Prelude.
Bach: Toccata and Fugue in D
Minor..
Karg-Elert: Benediction
Gigout: Scherzo.
Puccini: Finale
Schubert: Marche Militaire
* * *
MICUI[GAN PLAYS
Those who welcomed the ap-
pearance of a creative interest in
drama last year on the campus
which culminated in the publica-
tion of "Michigan Plays" will be
interested in the short critical re-
view the book receives in the Oc-
tober number of "Theatre" maga-
zine. There is nothing important
said that did not come out in the
discussion of the book last year.
The reviewer grants that the book
shows an "interesting variety and

C

4' rr! umm ma eaes me rmm e mamam mmm eman Fiie eC
ATTNTION
Engineer's and Architects Materials
Fountain Pens, Loose Leaf Notebooks
Typewriting and Pound Papers
Stationery, Leather Goods
College Pennants and Jewelry
- ~A GENERAL LINE OF SUPPLIES FOR
ALL STUDENTS
at theI
tudent upply tore.
1111 South University
One-Half Block from the Campus

1'A
'I'.

11

P r~r r_[__ -r . .. E 0..I r MM1rr rd r rIr rdr rJ r rrr r rr* r r U r c [ r r~r "

(sr.s ea e . awa e i .!!Ld"rjrj&ACAMI BUR"Acacicirici cicic citts°IL°,1 'JCJL:JC.IGCJ I 1E fCdrd-c-i 4--r-. cjcili±irjrj r-4ra Ar-j" 1-11

Night Editor - Gurney Williams
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 1929
RE WOMEN REGENTS
Governor Green's appointment of
Mrs. Cram to the regency left va-
cant by Hanchett's resignation
does not call for a wail of disap-
proval nor yet a paen of praise.
It is simply interesting, and could
have been a lot worse. The gov-
ernor, for instance, might easily
have made a grossly political ap-
pointment or an effort to dictate
the choice of Michigan's next pres-
ident.
Neither of these two ends, which
we can conceive as being dear to
the governor's heart, is it possible
to see furthered in the appoint-
Anent of Mrs. Cram whom press
dispatches describe as a woman of
wide community interests and no
other qualifications in particular.
We can therefore take hope from
her appointment that the governor
has ceased to regard the University
as a handy shuttle-cock for the
battledores of his political machine,
and we can welcome Mrs. Cram
without any of the prejudice and
suspicion that would have attach-
ed to a number of other possible
appointees.
As for the novelty of her position
as first woman regent, there is
good deal to be said in favor of
representing her sex on the gov-
erning board of the University. Her
point, of view anent the problems
peculiarly female that arise in the
government of a co-educational in-
stitution should be distinctly valu-
able. In this connection there arise
immediately thoughts of the new
dormitory to house 450 women, the
stew surrounding the management
of the Women's League building,
and the arguments for a dean of
women against the three-adviser
arrangement.
The danger inherent in estab-
lishing the precedent of a woman
regent is more future than pres-
ent. When Mrs. Cram finishes for-
mer Regent. Hanchett's term, an-
other woman very possibly will be
nominated to run for election, and
in the heat of a nominating con-
vention some one not so able, level-
headed. and unprejudiced may be

t

a

SHOP
AND
SAVE
HERE

CDIDDN'T DRUG

MAIL
ORDERS
FILLED

''I:
4',}
t , . '

723 N. UNIVRSITY

217 N. MAIN

207 S. MAIN

_I________ ________________

I,

DRUGS," AT SAVI

44

tPri ~ we~qrrrw~ew- PA-M n~ - - -9!----MM-Iarmr- - -Mr ' WI rmp m 5 r.2 WI WIrmrm Wr I WIMWrI W,!2 rn I W P% t

OS

$1.00

.91 4
4r . S
'a,!7

45C
KOTEX

SPECIAL
This week our patrons will have a chance

$1.00
ZONITE
89C

t'
'f

39C
$1.00
LYSOL
'79c
60c
MULSIFIED
COCO-NUT
OIL
43c
$1.20
SAL
HEPATICA
98c
50C
AQUA
VELVA
44c
1 Oc Palmolive Soap

r
f

to buy
prices.'

quality drugs at extreme economy
For Instances

,..
,: ,;
. ,

..

60c Pompeian Night Crea ... ....... 49c
50c Jergen's Lotion ............ 43
50c Pepsodent ....43c
35c Mum 31C
35c Stacomb ...31c
65c Pond's Creams 57c
60c D. and R. Cold Cream ...53c
75c Rubbing Alcohol . .49c
$1.00 Beef, Iron and Wine . ... 79c
30c Phenolax Wafers .27c
100 Aspirin Tabs 79c
50c Unguentine 42c
$1.00 Coty's Face Powder.. 9c
75c West Tooth Brush and Paste. 50c.

25c
MAVIS
TALC
$1.c
SQUIBB'S
MINERAL OIL
89y
30c
IODENT
43c
$1.00
GILLETTE
BLADES
69c

,,

I

x,

1

6c

10c Lux Toilet Soap 2 for.
25c Woodbury's Soap.
30c Packer's Tar Soap.
25c Cuticura Soap.
25c Lacco Castile Soap.
25c Resinal Soap.
$1.00 Gillette Blades
$1.00
NUJOL
89c
75c
MEADS
DEXTR
MALTOSE
63c

19C
21c
*21c
*21c
*17c
21c
6ic

75c Mennen Talc and Skin
Balm 50c
50c Menimn's Shave Cream.. 43c

$100
I ISTER INE
79t*

35c Barbosal

29c

$1.00
CRIPPEN
DONNA BELL
.79-C

50c Life Buoy Shave Cream 34c
35c Palmolive Shave Cream .29c
42c Gem Blades ... 42c
25c Par After-Shave Talc . 17c
50c
NYAL
TOOTH
PASTE
42c
50c
HINDS
HONEY AND
ALMOND
43c

f;,.

I'
1'

s
A

s
< /
i
F)

1-~
R
E

4
I

1.

A:

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan