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October 22, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-22

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THE MICHICA N

DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 192q

REEVESDELEGATE
ATIACHERS' SESSION
Society Composed of Prominent
Dignitaries from Many
Parts of World
JICKJNSON GIVES SPEECH
Net Meeting of Institute to
be Held at University
of Cambridge
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves of the po-
litical science department returned
Monday from the meeting of the
conference of teachers of inter-
national law. The fourth meeting
of the conference was held in con-
junction with the annual session
of the Institute of International
Law, held at Briarcliff Lodge, New
York.
The Institute is a society com-
posed of the more prominent men
in the world who are interested in
the field of International Law. The
body was formed over 60 years ago,
with a limited membership, and
this year marks the first time that
the session has been held in the
United, States. The regular business
mneeti'ng of the institution con-
tinued from October 18 to 21.
Teachers Attend.
Fifty of the more prominent
teachers of International Law
were invited to meet with the In-
ternational Law body. The teach-
ers held their conferences in the
evening, and in the. daytime, at-
tended the meetings of the Insti-
tte. Various members of the lat-
ter group read papers, and Profes-
so Reeves,,n an interview, stated,
"We were thus privileged to come in
to contact with the Institute as a
whole and with it. distinguished
Membership"
Professor Reeves conducted a
round table conference on the sub-
ject of the methods and topics of
teaching International Law. He also
delivered to the conference as a
whole the report of the methods
accepted by his group. Another
member of the University faculty,
Prof. Edwin D. Dickinson of the
Law School, was also a member of
the conference, and spoke before a
general meeting on a particular
phase of International Law.
Has Imposing Personel.
The personnel of the Institute of
International Law comprises some
of the greatest dignitaries of the
world. Included in the list of mem-
bers are four judges of the Perma-
nent Court of International Justice
at The Hague. Antonio S. de Bus-
tamante y Sirven of Cuba, Sir Cecil
J; B. Hurst of Great Britain,
Raphael Altamira y Crevea
of Spain, and Demetre Negulaesco
of Roumania are The Hague
judges who were present at the
conference at Briarciff Lodge.
Three members of the faculty of
the University of Paris, and pro-
fessors of International Law there
also attended the meeting. They
were: Jules Basdevant, Gilbert
Gidel, and Albert de Lapradelle.
Also in attendance was Walter
Simons of Germany, who was for-
merly the German Minister of For-
eign Affairs and who was acting
president of the German Republic
in the interval between the terms
of President Ebert and President
von Hindenburg. Simons is at pres-
ent the President of the Supreme

Court of Germany.
The next annual meeting of the
Institute of International Law will
be held at Cambridge,' England, and
will be presided over by Alexander,
Pearce Higgins professor of Inter-
national Law at Cambridge Uni-
versity.
CHAMPAIGN-URBAN, Ill.-Fall
baseball practice is under way at
the University of Illinois, several
fast six-inning games having been
played already.

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'SAM HILL) TAKES HOOVER TO LIGHT JUBILEE

F

SLAPS ADDRESSES LEAGUE THEATRE INAUGURATES
NEW TYPE OF ENTERTAINMENTI

r

Y I U Ii I W IliL LI I I11 I Officials of the Lydia Mendels- theatre work of this university
______sohn theatre inaugurated a new The picture attracted the atten-
«::::::U'ing is the theme of his lee-' type of program last night with the! tion of the theatre officials through
[ iitre iTennyson's immortal passageI featuring of "Growth of the Soil," its long metropolitan runs by the
"I doubt not through the ages, one the Scandinavian epic of Knt distinctive praise which critics have
increasing purpose runs; and the Hamsun. This type of presentation the piece, and by the per-
thoughts of men are widened, with Iis an experiment for the theater given
the process of the suns," Rev. Al- and in all probability will be the sonal contacts of a member of the
lison Ray Heaps, pastor of the First established practice for "dark" .tall. Miss Loomis is of the opin-
Congregational Church, delivered weeks. ion that the miu is an exceedmn-
the main address at the first of a "It is not the policy of our or- ly diligent reproduction of the
series of experimentalhdevotion ganization," Amy Loomis, dector novel The photography and e-
services sponsored by the Student of the theatre, told a reporter yes- lection of actors was under the s-
Chrstin . citio Suda ev- erdy to infringe in any way periino h uhr
ing at the Lydia Mendelssohn upon the work of the amateur '"The film is" according to the
theatre.me tI dramatic groups of the campus. theatre director, "true in every re-
'graOver four hundred people, the{ The purpose is not a commercial spect to the detail of the book. It
. . great erpart, f whom were Univer- one, as we are interested in giving' is a work of art, in all highest
which was based an A M E. Hut- the new art movie a place In the meaning of the term,"
Adun.son'sibook, "One Increasing
ssoca tea Press Photo Purpose." Colored slides which (- -- - ---
celebration. Also shown above is b.ggage car afire, The baggage car Reverend leaPs used to illustrate
This train of the rtyle of 18791 the restored Smith's Creek station. is an exact duplicate of that in the talk were produced by the pas
a InT863Edion ws eecte fro whch tetfr himself and have been used
yesterday carried President Hoover In 1863 Edison was ejected from which the youthful Edison kept his on similar occasions throughset
and Thomas A. Edison from Detroit a similar train onto the station magazines and fruit and, in spare t mcountry.
. platform by an enraged conductor moments, conducted his exper- of the oram was
to attend the light golden jubilee when one of his experiments set a ments with chemicals. _Te ret1epo grm ewas
____________ __ --made up of responsive service, D
fsymposium reading and music by4300
GOLD OF SPAfNISH MINERS REMAINS So far nothing has been found the quartet as well as an offering 4300 4t00
' D N IN P R VI N H NT R A Dthat would give the exacthni location by the harpist, Dorothy VanZwal-
HIof the towns, but several authentic uwenberg. The members iof the
That thirty millions of dillars In psd 1o cross Brazil and return to pans aucit aebe quartet were Thelma Lewis, so- MEN'S $0
found describing the expeditions prano; Annis Dexter Gray, con-Caned
washed gold lies hidden in thv C zatio they pcannidtto against the rebellious miners. tralto:Paul P. Brainard, tenor Sutsand
jungles of Eastern Peru and h leave, the Indians rebelled against ---I Pressed
been there since the time of the their taskmasters, killed all the - Overcoats
Spaniards has been kinown for Spaniards, burned the towns, and NOW NOW
years But exactly where 0 no one left the gold where it was, hidden LSHOWING W ER TH E SHOWINGS
knew. in the cellars of the miners' houses._______________________________PaiClad
In the decade 1l7301-790, a lroul The Indians were head hunters, aCleaned 25
of Spanish gold miners, rebelling and for years, so fierce was their Dresses and
against paying the king's fiftfh of hatred of the white man, they al- Pressed
all the gold that they mined, fled lowed no intruders, and it was not I Cots
beyond the jurisdietion of Spain in until after 1900 that the country 1THEECoats
to the wilderness behind the moun- was again visited by white people.I r
tains of Peru. here, they set up In 1920; Prof. A. S. Aiton, of the INBO W , C.O. D. n Deiery
their own independent colonies history department, at that time
and started to mine gold. Ten working in the archives of Spain,_____---
'thousand Indians were enslaved received a letter from a well known
and put to work in the washings. American mining engineer, who MARIAN NIXON
Spain sent expeditions to bring, had just returned after a three FRANKIE DARRO
back the mutinous miners but each year sojourn in the back country f u LLOYD INGRAAM
time they returned empty handed, of Peru. He stated that he had
repulsed by the small band4 who found the washings of the Spanish a 9ranmount AliTALING Gctur
fortified themselves in the strong- miners, but that the towns in SHOWS 1:30 TO 11:00 CLs''S
holds of the hills. which the gold was hidden were lip'_A__ _ _ _ _ _ _
For three years, the Spaniards in the midst of an impenetrable --_- ~_~_~_~
maintained themselves in Eastern jungle, forty miles square in area,--_ ---__
Peru, while the ten thousand In- through which an expedition would-
dians washed gold for them. . Each have to cut its way with extreme - - -
Indian was required to wash a cer- difficulty. He asked Professor Aiton
tain amount each day. Computa- to help him find some record that
tions based on this daily amount would give the exact location of
for a period of three years show a' the towns. But he also stated that,
total of between thirty and forty whether or not the record was
million dollars. Then the miners, found, he was going back to Peru in
satisfied with their treasure, want- 'search of this fortune.

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On CHAZ CHASE "ENCHANTED
Stage In Person FOREST"

Fantasy
of Dance

SEE!

HEAR

7=-

r

Detroit Theatres

NOW PLAYING
2:00-3 :40-Te Living Screen Presents-7 :009.:OO

A

LAFAYETTE
"LITTLE ACCIDENT"
with Thomas Mitchell
A Laugh Riot!
Matinees: Sat. 50c-$2.00
Nights: 50c, $2.50
CASS
GEO. SIDNEY
"KIBITZER"
Matinees: Wed. and Sat. 75c, $1.50
Nights: $1.00, $2.50

e.
Triumphant
Return-
Unparalleled in the
Realm of Perfect Enter
tainment-
TAL(See
TANGAINGI
S 1~~AUGHING Agi
M ,.-n e A n d
=- + Again

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