100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

w

PAGE LTY

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13. 1921

;:

LAWYERS PLAN STUD

WHEN GENERAL CHARLES DAWES WAS PRESENTED KEYS
I TO SUDBURY, SUFFOLK WHERE ANCESTORS WERE BORN

I .

Screen Reflections _i

1

li

I
.

OF COURT LAW CODE
BY JUDICAL_ COUNCILSi
FUNDS DERIVED FROM LAW,
CLUB WILL CARRY OUT
COMPLETE RESEARCH
NEW BODY WILL GIVE AID
Irmprovements May Result From
Thorough Investigation
by Michigan Men!
(Continued From Page One)
Professor Sunderland, as Pro-
fessor of legal research, expects to*
utilize the facilities of the Re-
search Institute, so far as may be
needed, in the study of the prob-
lems of judicial administration
which the Judicial council of Mich-
igan may from time to time select
for investigation and report. One
of the first problems to be taken
up will be the study of judicial
statistics in order to determine
what records should be kept by the
officers of the courts of the state.
in order to show the character and
extent of the business which is
being done, and to form a basis for!
improving court organizations and
procedure.
The statute creating the Judicial
council charges it with the duty of1
making a continuous study of the
organization, rules, and pmethods of
procedure and practice of the ju-
dicial system of the state, the work
accomplished, and the results pro-
duced by that system and its vari-
ous parts. The act provides that
the clerks of the various courts and
other officials thereof shall make
to the council such reports, from
time to time, as the council may
prescribe. No judicial statistics
have ever been kept in Michigan,
and there is no system in use for
recording the work of the courts,
as operative agencies.j
It is obvious that no fundamental
improvement can be made in the,
administration of justice until full
information is available regarding]
the efficiency of the methods now;
employed. It is expected that a
large amount of preliminary work
willhave tobe done in order to de-
termine what data ought to be ob-
tained from the various courts of
the state. A committee of the ju-
dicial council consisting of Oscar C.
Hull, Detroit, Stuart H. Perry, Ad-
rian, and Professor Sunderland, has
been appointed to investigate this
question, and to submit recom-
mendations to the council.
Most of the necessary data will
have to be collected by Professor1
Sunderland and his assistants, and'
it is expected that this work will
require several months of study.
Part of it can be done by means of
material available in the law li-
brary, but most of it will require
an investigation of the records now
being kept by the various courts1
of the state.1
WASHINGTON- (U.P.-Plans for
a possible post-season Army-Navy
football game were abondoned yes-
terday, but negotiations between
the War Department and the Se-
3retary of the Navy are being con-!
tinued in hope of a resumption of
athletics in 1930 or 1931.

Which Shall It Be Today?
MICHIGAN: Sue Carol in a mu-1
sical talkie "Why Leave Home," and
an eleven act Syncopation Stage
Show.
MAJESTIC: Maurice Chevalier
in a tuneful talkie "Innocents of
Paris."
aWUERTH: Warner Oland in a
mystery talkie "The Mysterious Dr.
Fu Manchu."
Generally-
With an apparent subsiding of
talking picture criticism, one fact
stands out clearly, that this form
of entertainment has certainly in-
jected a new note of refreshing
originality into film production.
Great as this progress has been.
it seems but a beginning of future
developments which will establish
motion pictures as the most potent
factor in the entertainment world,
not completely supplanting but
merely supplementing the stage.
For, with the promised mechanical
perfection of the talking picture,
and more important, the third-di-1
mensional screen supplying real-
istic depth, it will, offer a world-
wide background and unlimited
settings unlike the comparatively
narrow limitations of the individ-
ual theatre to which the play-
wright has heretofore had to con-
fine himself.
All of which,

however, does not solve the more
immediate and important problem
of today's entertainment facilities.
At the Michigan Sue Carol, Nick
Stuart, David Rollins, and Walter
Catlett romp around in a musical
comedy talkie version of the fam-
ous farce "Cradle Snatchers." The
picture is entertaining, not as fun-
ny as it might be, but amusing
enough.
A heralded eleven act stage re-
view promises to feature the show.
Incidentally a talking feature,
vaudeville on the stage, and a reg-
ular orchestra is a good half-dol-
lar's worth any day in the week-
to say nothing of Sunday. Try and
duplicate it in most towns nowa-
days.
Furthermore,
the downtown attraction all week
is an all-talking adaptation of a
Sax Rohmer mystery thriller. "The
Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu" boasts
an excellent cast headed by War-
ner Oland, Neil Hamilton, and Jean
Arthur. All indications point to
its being one of the best of its
type to reach the screen, so you
probably won't go wrong on a trip
to the Wuerth. But that remains
to be seen-and heard.
Maurice Chevalier, Parisian mu-
sical comedy idol, is at the Majestic
in his first picture, "Innocents of
Paris." Tuneful songs, an inter-

ANN ARBOR NEWSBOY
IS ATTACKED BY DOG
Max Dettling was cvcrely bitten
and scratched about the face last
evening as he was delivering maga-
zines near the corner of Jefferson
and State streets by a large collie
dog, presumably mad.
A gentleman, unidentified but
for the name of Benson, came to
the lad's assistance and took him
immediately to the University Hos-
pital where he was given first aid.
Officers Herbert Kapp and Eu-
gene Garringer of the Ann Arbor
police found and shot the dog
about 6:15 o'clock, an hour later, at
approximately the same spot on
Jefferson street. The dog bit
through Kapp's glove and sunk his
teeth in his hand as he tried to
subdue the angry animal.
Max will soon be delivering his
magazines around the campus
again, the injury not being serious
enough to be confining for any
length of time.
The dog seemed to have no own-
er inasmuch as it was untagged and
had been seen loitering around the
Michigan Union for the past five
days.
esting background, and the star's
pleasing personality are the film's
highlights.

IJ

'0

representative during the celebra- eral popularity a.
General Charles G. Dawes, Amer- tion given in his honor. Since his ists of the natio
ican ambassador to Great Britain, ascension to the position of am- almost constantly
was given the freedom of the city bassador, Dawes has been the
when he visited Sudbury, Suffolk, center of attraction in England. paper cameras.
England. It was from Sudbury that His unconventional attire at re-_
his ancestors emigrated to America. ceptions, his pointed remarks to the
The photo shows the American !houses of Parliament, and his gen-Dm
Greenland Expert Returns With Information
Concerning Hobbs Geology Station in Arctic
"Godthaab, the most northerly 'are allowed unless employed by the
capitol in the world, has the only government or engaged in scien-
two cows in Greenland which are tific investigation. For administra-
owned by the manager of the gov- tive purposes the land is divided
ernment fox farm." Evans S. into two sectione, a northern and a
Schmeling, '28, who has just re- southern part, each governed by a
turned to this city after spending magistrate and his assistant. The
the past six months as assistant magistrate must have his doctorate
aerologist of-the Michigan Green- of jurisprudence from a Danish
land expedition at Mount Evans, university before he may be chosen
thus gave his impression of that , for the post."
country's largest city. This magistrate, as Schmeling
Other facts about this northern explained, has his seat at either
island-continent were revealed by Godthaab or Godhaven, but travels
Schmeling in a half hour's talk about the country to different
yesterday. 1posts where he dispenses justice
"All trade is in the hands of the and deals out punishment to those
government, and no white settlers of the native population who have
, committed other crimes against ther
We Will" Endurance law.
Fliers Land In Mist "There are only about 100 white
men in all Greenland. These are
(By Associated Press) usually of one of four classes: car-
CHICAGO, Oct. 12.-The "Chi- penters, masons, scientists or the
cago-We Will" landed at Sky Har- governor and his assistant. No set-
bor Airport a few minutes before tlement of white people is allowed Attend
7 o'clock this morning just after it in order to keep spirits and tobacco Mati
had passed its 264th hour in the out of the country and to prevent
air. The end of the flight was the outbreak of consumption
forced by inability to refuel the among the native population.
plane because of dense fog. "The chief revenue of the island
The fog ended the fourth at- comes from the sale by the gov-
tempt of the "Chicago-We Will" ernment of blue fox pelts. These
[to surpass the 421-hour record of are purchased from the natives for
the "St. Louis Robin." The first 25 kronen and sell in Denmark fork
two flights, in July, ended wvithin 800 kronen."
a few hours, but early in August After leaving Holstenborg, the
the plane stayed aloft 291 hours, nearest settlement to Mount Evans,
being forced down because of Schmeling and the two other mem-
magneto trouble. berg of the expedition, Leonard
The flyers, it was made known, [Schneider, meteorologist, and Karl
are John and Kenneth Tunter, Hansen, radio operator, embarkedtB
brothers. for Copenhagen.
For those who demand
the best in Dance Orchestras
The Victors
The Aristocrats
The Michiganders
The Varsity Serenaders
WOOLNER ORCHESTRA SERVICE

mong the journal-
n have made him
a figure for news-

I,

i

onds, Watches, Clocks, Jewelry
Hagh Grade Repair Service

-.1

THE BEST FOOD
IN ANN ARBOR
George 's
RESTAURANT
Special Sunday CHICKEN DINNER - 70c
611 East William (Near State)

41

41

It Has Com
Tomorrow at 1 o'c
Review-with 20 Ra
THE PICTURE!!
Smart dialogu
your wit! Two-edg
Subtle! 'Keen!
Listen to thi
Sunday screen ever afforded!
flees
J \
-fr.-. 11

THE MICHIGAN THEATER LEADS AGAIN!
! The Perfect Stage And Screen Show!

e

r

{ I
t

1 1

clock, the Michigan Introduces to Ann Arbor its First Stage Band
dio-Keith-Orpheum Entertainers and a Stage Orchestra of 15. AND
ue. saying naughty things in cultured English! Repartee that ;iharpens
ed words! Situations of tantalizing possibilities, yet,-oh, so proper.

ti

is picture closely and you'll get from it the greatest- enjoyment

the

Le

*1

I

PORTABLE
TYPEWRITERS
We have all makes.
Remington, Royals.
Corona, Underwood
Colored duco finishes.

I

Price $60.

0. D. MORRILL

314 South State St. Phone 6615

a1

515 Monroe

SIDNEY H. WOOLNER

Phone 21869

1

I

.H- '

i

-.w1111w

THE LIVING SCREEN
Continuous Performance Today 1:00 P. M. to 11:00 P. M.

141

America's New Thrill!

a.
&

*1

.. V -tl l S O- r r i:v ..... r.. ..

... , . -
.. _ .,..-...,..,. s C 7Crr c D C

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan