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October 12, 1929 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-12

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1'AGE FORn

THE MICHIGAN DAIY

~A~AY7 ~ >IZ

T

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Vember of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
-The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the, use for republication of all news dis
patches'cci~~ to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the posto. .ce at Ann Arbor
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post{
master General.
:Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.30
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
hnard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4923; Business, 21214

4

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ELLIS B. MERRY

the structure was erected. {
Professor Sherlock states that he
does not object to the installation
of a suitable light but feels that
the expense should be borne by
some governmental agency or some
of the air transport interests. This
has resulted in a deadlock between
the two parties concerned; and
since there is no legal precedent by
which the case may be settled the
outcome will be interesting and
valuable.
At the present time there are
no regulations governing the pro-
per lighting of aerial menaces and
there is no standard light which
spells danger to a flier unfamiliar
with ground over which he, may
fly. Moreover, situations of this.
kind are as yet comparatively rare.,
But aviation has now reached the
stage of adolescence at least and
the question of the rights of prop-
erty owners versus those of com-
mercial flying concerns will be-
come more and more the founda-
tion for unique legal debates and,
ultimately, the answer to the prob-
lem of safer airways.
At any rate, if the great system
of air transportation is to continue
to expand, some definite laws must
be formulated to protect it- and
they must be laid down as soon as
is commensurate with the prob-
lem. Until then there must be a
compromise. As it stands now the
whole question smacks of preju-
dice-of the old days when buggy
riders growled at motorists and
motorists sneered at buggy riders.

TED ROLL
IS IT POSSIBLES
THAT THIS RAZZES
D THEM & D EDITOR?
Dr. Mr. Lark:
Feeling that you are really one
of the few intelligent critics on the
campus at present and thus are
capable of appreciating my view-
point, I am sending you the en-
closed example of what I consider
to be "good dramatic criticism." I
feel safe in sending it to your col-
-umn alone, for, to .my mind, it is
the last and only redeeming fea-
ture of the newspaper wherein it
appears and, which has fallen into.
such a deplorable state as late.
Very sincerely,
dr. whoofle
P.S. I wrote this criticism
CRACKER JACKS

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Editor.....................George C. Tilley
City Editor............ ... Pierce Rosenberg
News Editor..............George E, Simons
Sports Editor........Edward B. Warner, Jr.
Women's Editor.,...........Marjorie Follmet
Talegraph Editor............George Stauter
Music" and Drama ........ William J. Gorman
Literary Editor ........Lawrence R. Klein
Assistant City Editor....-Robert J. Feldmar
Night Editors
Frank E. Cooper Robert L. Sloss
William C. Gentry Gurney Williams, Jr
Henry 3. Merry Walter Wilds
Charles R. Kaufman
Reporters

Charles A. Askren
Helen Barc
Lo)uisc Behymner
Thomas M. Cooley
W. H. Crane
Ledru t. Davis
Helen Domine
Margaret Eckels
Katherine Ferrin
Carl Forsythe
Sheldon C. Fullerton
Ruth Geddes
Ginevra Gin
SEdmund Glavin
ack Goldsmith
D. B. Hempstead, Jr.
tames C. Hendley
ichard T. Hurley
Jean H. Levy
Rssell E. McCracken
Lester M. May

William Page
GustavmR. Reich
John D. Reindel
eannie Roberts
Joe Russell
Joseph F. Ruwitch
William P. Salzarulo
George' Stauter
Cadwell Swanson
Jane Thayer
Maegaret Thompson
Richard L. Tobin
Beth Valentine -
Harold 0. Warren
Charles S. White
G. Lionel Willens
L ionel G. Willens
. E. Willoughby
arbara Wright
Vivian Zimit

A

Music And Drama
n. n

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214'
BUSINESSMANAGER
A. J. JORDAN, JR.
Assistant Manager
ALEX K. SCHERER

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Department Managers
Advertising..........Hollister MabI :y
Advertising ........... Kasper H. Halverson
Advertising ................ Sherwood Upton
Service........ .....George Spater
Circulation.............. ...J. Vernor Davis
Accounts ................... .....Jack Rose
Publications ................ George Hamilton
Assistants

Howard W. Baldock
Raymond Campbell
Tames E. Cartwright
Robert Crawford
Harry B. Culver
Thomas M. Davis
ames Hoffer
Norris Johnson
Cullen Kennedy
Charles Kline
Marvin Kobacker
,Lawrence Lucey,
George Patterson
Norman Eliezer
Anson Hoex

Robert Williamson
Thomas Muir
Charles Sanford
Lee Slayton
Roger C. Thorpe
William R. Worboys
J eanette Dale
Bessie V.Egeland
Bernice Glaser
Helen E. Musselwhite
Hortense Gooding
Eleanor .Walkinshaw
Alice :McCully
Dorothy Stonehouse
Dorothea Waterman
Marie Wellstead

CLASS DUES
The ultimate destination of the
funds raised by class dues has long
been for most students one of the
campus' unsolved mysteries. There
is, of course, a page in the Michi-
ganensian reserved by each class at
an annual cost of about $40.00, and
the rest of the money is generally
believed to gravitate to some fund
or other out of which the class
buys the University a gift, or per-,
haps pays off the deficit, if any, on
the class dance.
Therehis also a sneaking sus-
picion, held by a large number of
suspicious individuals, that class
dues are scarcely more than a tra-
ditional, if illegitimate graft for
the class officers. This notion is
strengthened by the lack of pub-
licity given to class expenditures,
and the fact that payment of duesI
is not compulsory. Some believe,
in other words, that class treas-
urers play a little game: if they
can fool anyone into paying, their
cleverness has earned the right to
anything paid. It smacks of sell-
ing campus tickets and library
lockers to freshmen.
To lift this veil of secrecy andt
suspicion which surrounds classI
finances, The Daily suggests thatj
the Student council commit an-
other of its investigations. We ap-
pend a strong recommendation
that payment of dues be made
compulsory and the class treasurer
required to publish a balance sheet,
or that they be abolished entirely.
0

To the jaded theatre-goer whose'
dramatic taste has been cloyed a
with the recent output of esoterics
rubbish, foisted upon the public ins
the name of the stage-Paris, Mys
Girl Friday, Hell Bent Fer Heaven,i
Rainbow's End. . . . to mentiont
a few, Cracker Jacks, the current
attraction at the Palace theatref
(Greater Detroit) will come as ae
welcome. relief.
Starred with the inimitable Sam1
Mitchell and the immeasurable
Wava! White, whose delicious littlet
whimsy, Pick Me Up and Set Me
Down, sung at the end of the first
act, charms with its delicate veint
of irony, the musi-comi-revue (an
innovation in itself) promises to be
the big hit of the week, easily out-
stripping the much more expensive
shows, such as the Miracle, etc.
In addition to these two artistes,t
as if the management could not do1
enough, Teresina, the sensational
dancer, has been added to the cast,
.who, with her "runway" girls,1
dances withall the abandoned
grace of the gloriklis old ballet1
russe which, back in those memor-
able nineties, so thrilled us of an-
other generation.
Teresina is gifted with an exten-
sive repertoire and a rare person-
ality which seemed to fillthe stage1
each time she appeared. There is
a .quality in her dancing that al-
most eludes description-one might1
call it -a rare vibrancy, as it were.1
With an especial , aim at "con-+
structiveness," we would suggest1
that. Miss Teresina use a little more;
of the rabbit's foot and rouge on+
the left-cheek (facial) tonight, as
her appearance was a little unbal-
anced in last night's performance.
I No offense is, however, intended.
The performance as'a whole is
of a distinct type, endeavoring to
break down as much as possible
the inevitable barrier which foot-
lights erect between an audience
and the players. Various devices
were resorted to to enhance this
aim, all of which were accepted in
a mood of true appreciation by the
audience, in which several of Ann
Arbor's more prominent residents
were prominently figured.
dr. whoofle

EDWARD W. REDFIELD
Alumni Hall's West Gallery is
roken out with whites and blues.
deep-dyed radical was Edward
1edfield in his pre-war heyday
when romantic impressionism was
t its height and solid forms with
ichnapps were the thing. In the
econd decade of this up-and-do-
rg century he dominated every
ig show in this country. Last
'ear his paintings were given din-
gy corners and back-of-the door
placement in the Carnegie Inter-
national. Radicalism is the van-
guard of art but the tagging in-
antry soon marches over the pros-
trate leaders. The same thing has
happened to Shaw in literature and
ocialism and to Strauss in music;
radia ls, progressives, and finally
riarmle; ; conservatives. Redfield
and his paintings have not chang-
ed-it is the contemporary field
which has overtaken and passed
him by.
Snow will always be snow. And
as long as realistic America loves
snow and blossoms Redfield will be
shown. In the Ann Arbor Art
show (which will hang until late
in October) his most outstanding
things are: Ocean Point, Brook in
Sunlight, Cherry Valley, and Up-
per Delaware. The last of these is
easily the most distinctive and
summarizes Redfield's qualities: a
beautifulsense for the violet haze
of distance, the choppy stroke and
the distinctive blue shadows of his
school.
Ten years ago this article would
have glowed with admiration for
the sardie paintings. But somehow
the world rolls on and tastes
change. To be stagnate is to die
and the reverse is just as true. Too
soon the big names become small
and' forgotten. In a very short
time even adventurer Matisse will
harden and be considered a timid
old stodgy. As long as the impres-
sionists are remembered, however,
Redfield will live, the American
branch of Monet Inc. If we were
half as good, fame and fortune
would wheel their own way.
L. P. B.

Choral

Union

Night Editor-ROBERT L. SLOSS
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1929
THE "B" TEAM.GAME
After two weeks in its own sta-
dium the University's first team is
away from home today, matching
its skill and power with the Pur-
due eleven. This shifting of scene
'need not draw the students'
thoughts entirely from Ann Arbor.
On historic Ferry field this after-
noon there will be a football battle
of intercollegiate rivalry that has
not been patronized as it deserves.
There will not be, of course, the
colorful crowd and the thrill of a
first team game, nor will the cali-
bre of football splayed be the a-
tia-c, bone-crushing variety that
marks the play of the country's
major teams. The junior varsity
games, however, possess a strong
competitive spirit, and they are in-
teresting exhibitions to the scien-
tific student of football. Elaborate
trick plays abound, and hare-
brained tactics are employed, often
so boldly as to succeed.
Moreover these games give stu-
dents an opportunity to display
their loyalty to Michigan, and to
serve the ultimate purpose of in-
tercollegiate athletics namely a
vacation from academic thoughts.
0-
SKY LIGHTS
Air-mindedness has become a
national habit, but the system for
properly safeguarding the skies has
been unable to keep pace with the
phenomenal growth of aviation,
with the result that individual re-
sponsibility for the existence of air
hazards in the form of tall ground
structures cannot be legally de-
termined. Commercial flying com-
panies believe that owners of
structures hazardous to fliers should
be compelled properly to designate
the danger by some sort of beacon;
owners of such structures, on the
other hand, are somewhat justified
in refusing to establish such lights
in view of the expense involved.
An ideal test case is to be found
locally in the controversy between
Prof. R. H. Sherlock, of the engi-
neering college, and the Stout Air
Service, Inc., of Dearborn. The

Concerts

IMPORTANT, CHANGES
LOUISE HOMER, distinguished American concert
and operatic star will inaugurate this season's Choral
Union Series of Concerts on
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15
taking the place of Martinelli whose return to America
has been delayed on account of illness.
IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI, distinguished pianist
will give his Ann Arbor recital on
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13
instead of on the date previously annodiced. The
postponement has been necessitated on account of an
operation for appendicitis which he underwent some
time ago.
The corrected schedule is as follows:
October 15-LOUISE HOMER, Contralto
October 30-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
November 19-THE ENGLISH SINGERS of London
December 3-LENER BUDAPEST STRING
QUARTET
December 10-CLAUDIA MUZIO, Soprano
December 13-IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI,
Pianist
January 16-JASCHA HEIFETZ, Violin
January 31-VLADIMIR HOROWITZ, Piano
February 12-ELISABETH RETHBERG, Soprano
March 10-DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

I

Editorial Comment

I

STUDENT CRIME
(The Butler Collegian)
A student from Brown university
robbed a restaurant. It was a con-
ventional place to rob, and hecdid
it in the conventional way; there
was nothing at all unusual about
the incident. Nevertheless, the
story was printed on the front page
of an influential newspaper, to-
gether with the student's picture,
and given a big play-not because
he had committed a crime, but be-
cause he was a college student.
Is there any real reason for this-
flood of publicity that two-thirds
of the American newspapers are
giving to student crime? If a
young employee in a machine shop,
holds up a filling station, he is
forced to shoot a policeman or two
in order to get more than three
lines of space in any paper. If a
white-collar clerk from some re-
spectable firm kills his sweetheart,
the murder is chronicled, but the
clerkship is barely mentioned. If a
college student is arrested for
speeding, the newspapers are sure
to mention his university, his so-
cial standing, his past achieve-f
ments, and his college necktie.
0
In a month or so 'the influenza
season will be back and the Greek
letter boys, we suppose, will be'call-
ing the Health Service to report
so and so many cases of fraternity
grippe.
A modern mother handing her
18-year-old daughter an earfull is
comparable to the old farmer who
locked the barn after the horse was
stolen.

j4 7 * $1
Mr. Mortimer Shuter perpe-
trator of the annual Union
Opera tells us the 1929 Opera
is assuming definite shape. We
don't much care about how de-
finite the shapes are, Morti-
mer, is'long as most of them
are a little shaplier than last
year's.
* * *
Two gunmen in Indiana were ar-
rested for stealing a machine gun
from an armory. -They said they
needed it. Poor fellows, even gang-
sters like to be shot in the manner
to which they are accustomed. t
Premier Howard Ferguson, of j
Canada, said yesterday that
Idrinking in Ontario will be
decreased fifty per cent in 10
years. Wonder what the plan
is, ban United States immigra-
tion?l
* * *
We saw a news reel the other
day of the territory Russia and
China are fighting over. From the
looks of the land, we suppose that.
if China wins she'll .make Russia
take the land.
LARK
Headline in local paper: WOMAN
FOUND SANE; MUST DIE.
He was a censor because he liked
to see the things other peopleI
shouldn't see.
Lightning never strikes twice in
the same place because it's never
the same place after it has been
struck once.

* * *
FACULTY CONCERT
May A Strong, soprano, and Guy
Maier, pianist, both pf the School
of Music, will unite their efforts in
an interesting program to be given
tomorrow afternoon in Hill Audi-
torium. This is the first of a series
of Faculty Concerts that is to con-
tinue periodidally throughout the
year. The School of Music Faculty
offered a concert every week dur-
ing the past Summer Session; they
were all well attended and proved
the- most entertaining feature of
extra-curricular activities during
the weltering months.
Miss Strong has won wide recog-
nition not only as a soprano of note
but as a composer of unusual abil-
ity. Her work, entitled "Slumber
Songs of the Madonna,' words by
Alfred Noyes, won first prize in the
contest under the auspices of the
National Federation of Women's
Clubs. At their biennial conven-
tion in Boston last June it was per-
formed, by a Boston orchestra and
a - large i chorus under the personal
direction of Miss Strong. Tomor-
row she is offering songs by Schu-
mann and Brahms and a modern
Igroup.
Guy Maier needs no introduction
for he and his partner Lee Patti-
son are well known as Moran and
Mack. Their two piano concerts
consistently appear on the musical
schedules of ail the large centers.
Mr. Maier has attracted consider-
able :attention independently by
his recitals for children, events
which have placed him in the fore-
front of performers in the field of
musical literature. The first half
of his program tomorrow presents
him in this attractive role.His
latter group is an interesting col-
lection of short modern numbers.
THE SOURING OF "SWEET
ADELINE"
No sooner did Len Shaw, veteran
Detroit Free Press critic, bemoan
the lack of musical comedies in
that city and take hope in the
promised engagement of "Sweet
Adeline," than a sad dispatch ar-
rived from Broadway saying that
the scheduled rehearsals for the
new company had- been called off
by producer Arthur Hammerstein.
It seems that Mr. Hammerstein
balked at the supposedly exorbi-
tant demands of the Union for du-
plicating the scenery of the origi-
.nal show, in which Helen Morgan
is now scoring a tremendous hit on
Broadway. The new troupe, which
included such reliables as Frank
Craven and Blanche Ring, was to
have begun rehearsals Monday,
and opened in Detroit November
17. Perhaps a compromise may yet!
be affected to briAg joy once more

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Season tickets at $6.00, $8.00, $1000 and $12.00 still available
at the School of Music,

A
Good
IVestment-
N ATURALLY your clothes last
longer when laundered in a
careful and exacting manner, with
the very best of modern equipment.
Then too, there need be little

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Satisfaction are well assured.

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