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October 12, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.PAMGE TWC

- - .- _ .I .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1929

mommomm"Aw

DTl OIT ALUMNI CLUB
BEGI*NSFALL ACTIVITYI
SPEAKERS INCLUDE FORMER
VARSITY FOOTBALL

S creen

.

Today
Opening:,Maurice
"Innocents of Paris" at
4!..

Chevalier's
the Majes-

CA" AIN L Closing: "Big News" at the Mich- F
LARGE NUMBER PRESENT igan and "On With the Show" atC
the Wuerth.#
Dr. Goetz Active In Directing Work Verily a .Hit
Of Organizing Large Group Exceedingly contagious and in- c
Of Michigan Alumni fectious is the new personality
which Maurice Chevalier, styled the
With a banquet last night at the "Al Jolson of France," brings to theo
Hote Sttle, Dtrot, ichgantalking screen. His motion picture(
Hotel Statler, Detroit, Michigan Idebut in "Innocents of Paris," op-o
alumi inaugurated their fall ac- ening at the Majestic today, stamps
tivity together with the Detroit In- him as ideally fitted to this new
ter'collegiate Alumni Club, Prin- form of entertainment.
ciple speakers were Judge Alfred J. The story concerns the romance
of a Parisian rag-man who rises toa
l\Iurphy, Hale G. Knight, president m aamsiacmdytr
fame as a musical comedy starit1
of the Club, and Dr. Angust G. While the plot will scarcely win any 1
Goetz. Dr. Goetz, '22, was captain laurels for originality, it is the least p
of varsity football at Michigan for important part of the film, Mon-,
two years; he is at present very sieur Chevalier and the music fur-a
active in directing the work'of or- nishing the necessary entertain-
ganization among Detroit alumni. ment,
Enrollment of Michigan alumni "Louise," the tuneful theme song
in the Club has already passed tlhe of the picture, has been heavily
three hundred mark. Importance plugged over the radio, etc. during
of Michigan men .in the Detroit Ins the months since the picture was
tercollegiate Alumni Club is shown first released, but the other num-
hers, especially the picturesquel
in that four men on the' Board' of r, epcalyte itreqe
Governors andetwelvetmen onthe French songs, are very amusing.
Board of Advisors are Michigan Sylvia Beecher is competent as;
graduates. the inspiration behind the hand' I
some songster's outbursts, but the
Of espedial interest to recent chief supporting honors belong to'
graduates of Michigan is the Junior a little curly-headed boy who gives
Membership which is available. Ac- a splendid performance as Cheva.-
cording to its terms a young man lier's companion. The personable
who has been out of Michigan star himself sings and smiles his'
three years or less ray makte ap- way throughout the film, which
plication for this kind of member- was ably directed by Richard Wal
ship. The financial arrangement lace, one of the best of taking pic-
enables payment over a period of ture directors.t
years and in the meantime the You should enjoy the Parisian's
mlemiber enjoys every Club privi- first talking picture, which seems!
lege. _ __

B leCtions
to have scored a hit wherever
shown.
Jubilant Jubilee
In spite of its Silver Jubilee, the
Fox in Detroit seems to have an ex-'
cellent show this week. "Married in
Hollywood," an original Movietone
operetta, with an Oscar Strauss
score and four stage stars in the
cast, is the screen attraction. On
the stage is another Fanchon and
Marco "Idea" baskting under the!
title of 'Beach Nights," Vince Silk,
offficiat ig.B
B, J. A.I
BAND LEAVES FOR PURDUE
With an extra out-of-town trip
as a reward for hard work this fall,
the R. 0. T. C. Varsity band left
ast night for Lafayette, Ind, to be
present at the Purdue game. The
band will spell the word "Purdue,"
and "Mich" duri g the manoeuv-
ers between halves.
Capt. H. B. Turner, military di-
rector, accompanied the band.

~IHGAN WIL EET
BOILERMAKERS TODAYI
(Continued From Page One)
PROBABLE LINEUPS
Michigan Pos. Purdue
Truskowski (c) LE.....,.Caraway
Roach ... . ....LT.... VanBibber
Poe ...........LG......... Stears
Bovard ........ C . .,...... Chubb
Steinke .......RG .......Buttner
Hayden .... . .. RT........ Sleight
Draveling .... .RE........ Mackle
Simral....... QB..... Harmeson
D ahlem ... -. -LH . - (c) W elch
Hudson ......RH........Purvis
Gembis .. ..... FB.....Yunevitch
Officials-Referee, Eckersall; Um-
pire, Haines; Field Judge, Hack-
ett; Head Linesman, L. Gardiner
Today
H USTON BROS.
Billards for Tradition 1

SMITH AND BOWLES WIN OVER into fourteen wards, with a coun-
cilman chosen from each ward. At
LODGE IN VOTE AT PRIMARIES present, the city council is com-
posed of nine men, elected at large.
---- - - -IThe amendment was bitterly op-
Much interest has been shown Department. Mayor Lodge did lit- posed by the three candidates for
in the results of the primary elec- tle personal campaigning, leaving the position of mayor, on the
t tions held in Detroit last Tuesday, the job of securing votes entirely grounds that such a plan would
in which Mayor John C. Lodge, a to the public. have diverted the interest of the
candidate for re-election, was de- Council from the city as a whole, to
feated in the mayoralty race by Included in the line of Detroit the wards, each ward as a distinct
Former Mayor John W. Smith and politics and city government, an group.
Charles Bowles. amendment to the city constitution,
Smith led the ticket by 18,000 providing that a new system for thef
votes, while Bowles had a lead of appointment of councilmen be in-
5,000 over I Mayor Lodge. A light augurated, was defeated. This ~ d - ea
vote was expected, and unusual proposal was presented by a "rmys--U
surprise was witnessed when a very terious committee" of fifty-one
heavy vote was cast in the pri- men. The amendment was for a di-
maries, according to Prof. A. W. rect re-establishment of the old ILAST TIMS TODAY
Bromage of the Political Science system of having the city divided
I ..~~---~~-~--~ 1- I911

4

MICHIGAN

I

a==

-Here In Person-
Late Michigan Union Opera Star
of "Cotton Stockings" Etc.
LIONEL "MIKE" AMES
with
JIMMY CLARK
Presenting
"FEMININE FANCIES"
also
MANGEAN TROUPE
offering
Sensational Acrobatic Pastimes
-on the stage-
ROBERT ARMSTRONG'S
funniest picture since
"IS ZAT SO?"
WORLD SERIES IN SOUND
"BIG NEWS"
An All-Talking Comedy with

i

11

ON'
F ir 100%, natural color picture in
Technicolor
STARTING SUNDAY
THl utVSTEtOI)S
" Chramoua cfl-
You see and lear the Boxer Re
bellion. Murder in an English so-
ciety drawing room. Love awesome
intrigue schemed by the most dia-
bolical character ever conceived by
the author Sax Rohmer.

r

r

SI The Living Screen In
The Theater With Perfect Tonal Reproduction
SeR8GiORY

4

f r!

Sivee lanD
for
REFRESMENTS
AND
TOASTED
SANDWICHES
CANDIES NUTS

America's Newest Thrill
MAURICE CHEVALIER
The World's Greatest Entertainer
Singing and Talking in

. . .
-. }.
,.If

I--

Next
Sunday

SYNCOPATION SHOW

with Zerro
Entertainers

CAROL LOMBARb

SAM HARDY

I

..

I.

at the
Armory
Every
Saturday Nite

A charming personality a delightful
voice and a dynamic quality reminisent
of Al Jolson at his electric best. The New
York Post says Maurice Chevalier is just
about the greatest artist now before the
public.

_

~<I4?~.

..

Park Plan
Everybody
W el come

Appointments
Two Vaudeville Headliners
CLARK AND McCULLOUGH
BATH BETWEEN
Paramount Sound and Silent News

With Great
Cast of
Favorites

fe laws of the Universe are
not indifferent, but are forever
on the side of the most sensitive
-Thoreau

212 South Main Street

XffTM

__
j

x,11.

...®

.. in therng,

PUNCH
/" S \

.RD KELVIN,
eminent British
scientist, when
asked why no one else
had invented so simple
a thing as the Feeder;
System, replied: The
only answer I can
think of is that no one
else was Edison."
Up to the time of the
Pearl Street Station,
the arrangement of "Let The
conductors used for arc
lighting was known as the "tree sys-
tem". When Mr. Edison began calcu-
lating the size of the conductors needed
for distributing current over a district
nearly a s uare mile in area, he was dis-
mayed to ind that the quantity of copper
required would be exceedingly costly.
Among the criticisms directed against
him was that there was not enough copper
in the world to supply his demands.
0 economize on conductors, Mr.
Edison invented a new system of amaz-
ing simplicity, called the "feeder" sys-
tem. The "tree" system was just what
its name implied. At the dynamo, the
main which energized the conductors to
the customer's premises was of a pro-
portionately large cross-section, like a
trunk; and gradually tapered off as
branches were fed from it and it ap-
proached the farther extremity of the
system. This was necessary to prevent
the lamps nearest the generator from be-
coming dangerously overheated because
the voltage diminished from the gen-
erator to the most distant lamp; but it
required an outlay for copper so enor-
mous as to be absolutely prohibitive in
modern service of large areas.
The "feeder" system solved this
problem by severing the direct con-
nection between the dynamo and the
mains which directly served the cus-
tomer's premises. Instead, current was
fed by means of other conductors called
"feeders" to selected central points in a
network of mains. The feeders were
connected directly to the dynamos, and
could be made comparatively small in
cross section. Inasmuch as the mains
were laid only along the blocks to be
served, and were not required to run all
the way to the station; they saving of
copper was enormous-seven-eighths, to
be exact. The cost of copper per lamp
served was reduced from $23.24 (for the
"tree" system) to $3.72.

IN spite of the ad-
vantages of the feeder
system, one of the
first difficulties en-
countered in supplying
a large district was the
limited distance that
could be economically
reached with the 110-
volt supply, since the
longer the electric
main, the larger was
the electrical loss due
to/heat caused by the
the main.

11

re Be Light"
resistance of

A solution of the difficulty was to
raise the supply pressure, since by
doubling the voltage it was possible to
transmit four times the distance with
proportional energy loss. But to do
this involved further difficulties. Mr.
Edison solved the problem by his fa-
mous "three-wire system, now in
general use throughout the world.
Instead of connecting the dynamos to
a pair of main conductors from which
the lamp filaments were fed, three con-
ductors were 4sed. Two dynamos were
joined together, the middle wire serving
as a neutral conductor when the load
was equally divided on the two others
and as a balancing conductor to carry
the difference when there was uneven
loading. Each of the other two wires
were connected to an outer terminal of
these dynamos. The total number of
connected lamps were divided as nearly
as possible into two equal groups, half
of them connected between the middle
or neutral wire and one outside wire,
and half between the middle and other
outside wire-the third wire serving
both groups. This meant an additional
saving of 62Y per cent in copper over
his "feeder" system, and electricity
could-be transmitted one-third greater
distance without extra loss of energy.
The three-wire practice at once became
standard for all low pressure systems.
IN 1883, the first three-wire system
was installed at Sunbury, Pa. A
year later, the first theater and the first
fire-engine house to be lighted from
a central station were connected in
'Brockton; Mass. In the engine house,
the, striking of the alarm during the
night automatically lighted all the
lamps and permitted the horses to take
their places under the harness. Thus,
for the first time, electricity lessened
the work of the fire department.
46

11

0

! !s
..in a cigarette it's
STICKIN' to our knrtin'"- never fort et-

'TA TE

4

ting that Chesterfield's popularity depends on
Chesterfield's taste.. .
But what is taste? Afoma, for one thing
keen and spicy fragrance. Fo; another, that sat-
isfying something --flavor, mellow tobacco
goodness--which we can only call "character "
Taste is what smokers want; taste is what
Chesterfield offers -
TAS T E ab t/' OV6OVHMILD. andyet
"TAS E ov vel TYHEA }ya

4

This is the fourth of a series of historical mnementos published

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