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October 07, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-07

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ESTABLISHED
1890

IC

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XXXIX. No. 13.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1928

ESLE

DEFEi

TS

I

I

MANY COURSE TICKETS
FOR CONCERT SERIES
BOUGHT THIS SEASON

TO PLACE SINGLE TICKETS
GENERAL SALE
TOMORROW

ON

PONSELLE TO SING SOON
Galli-Curci, Horowitz, K r e i s i e r,
Rachmaninoff, D'Aranyi, and
Hayes Are Features
Season tickets for the choral un-
ion concerts have enjoyed a re-
markable sale this year, according
to Charles A. Sink, president of the
University musical sa*Iety. Tickets
for the individual concerts will be
placed on sale tomorrow at the Uni-
versity School of Music, according
to Sink.
The season will be opened Wed-
nesday when Rosa Ponselle, noted
dramatic soprano of the Metropoli-
tan opera company, will appear
here. Her concert here will be one
of a few to be given here this fall.
Miss Ponselle has had a colorful
career, beginning at a very early
age when her voice had attracted
the attention of all who knew her.
Her first position as a singer was
in one of the old-time "nickleod-
eons." Each Saturday night during
that period the proprietor would
hand her twelve one-dollar bills,
her remuneration for the week. Her
debut in opera took place with Ca-
ruso in the opera "La Forza del
Destino."
Galli-Curci Will Sing
Galli-Curci will be the second ar-
tist on the program. Her appear-
ance on Oct. 22 is looked forward
to with great anticipation by lovers
of coloratura singing, of which she
is one of the best known exponents.
Following Galli-Curci, Vladimir
Horowitz, Russian pianist and solo-
it with the Detroit Symphony or-
chestra, will play here on Nov. 12.
The Flonzaley quartet, well known
group of stuing musicians, has in'-
eluded Ann Arbor in its itinerary
on its farewell tour. Ann Arbor was
one of the first cities in this coun-
try in which the quartet played
when they originally came to this
country for a concert tour.
Fritz Kreisler, often hailed as the
"king of violinists" will follow on
the concert series with a program
on Dec. 13, the last program before
the holiday season.
A special committee of Czecho-
slovakian Americans has been re-
sponsible for the bringing to this
country of the Prague teachers'
chorus, consisting of sixty school-
masters of this city and said to be
one of the finest groups of its
type in the world. Although the
number of their concerts in this
country is limited, they will appear
in Ann Arbor, on Jan. 24 with
Metod Dlezil conducting.
Another pianist besides Horowitz
namely Sergie Rachmaninoff will
occupy the limelight of the series
this year when he demonstrates his
musical genius once more for Ann
Arborites on Feb. 13. A second
violinist, too, in this case, Yelly
D'Aranyi will be heard on the ser-
ies.
TO SHOW JUNGLE
FILM AT WHITNEY
The new Martin Johnson African
jungle thriller, the motion picture
"Simba," arrives at the Whitney
theater tonight for a week's run af-
ter a successful three week's stay at
the Shubert-Lafayette theater in
Detroit.
T his picture, said to be by far the
best big game adventure ever
caught by the camera, will be ac-
companied by the Dulcetone, a new
sound invention. Actually taken in
the African jungles during four
-years of exploration by the John-
sons, "Simba" presents many strik-
ing views of wild animals in their
natural habitat.
, Some of the most thrilling scenes
idepict the charge of a maddened
rhino, the stampede of a massive
herd of elephants terrorized by a
jungle fire, the preying of treach-

-erous leopards upon their unsus-
pecting victims, and as a fitting
climax. the terrific battle between

Add Two Members
To Teaching Staff
In Forestry School
Two new men have been added
to the staff of the .Forestry school
with the rank of assistant profes-
sors. They are Prof. Ned Dearborn
and Prof. Howard M. Wight. Both
received notice of their appoint-
ment July 1, but they did not enter'
the teaching staff until this fall.
Professor Wight, who had been
conducting field research for the
forestry school since last February,
investigating privately owned game
refuges with the state department
of conservation, was appointed as-
sistant professor in forest zoology.
He received his A. B. from the Uni-
versity of Maine and his A. M. from
Oregon State Agricultural college.
He also served on the faculty of
the latter school as professor of
economic zoology, where he con-
ducted research and wrote a paper
on the history and control of ro-
dents and the mole. At the Iowa
State college he was subsequently
a member of the faculty until his
advent here. His special line of
work is economic mamalogy.
Professor Dearborn has had a
very varied experience in his field.
He graduated from Dartmouth with
a B. S. degree and earned his Sc. D.
at the University of New Hamp-
shire.
AUSTRIAN CIVIL WAR
lOOMS IN NEUSTADT,
Social Democrats, Heimwehr Fac-
tions Make Preparations For
Strife Expected, Today
THOUSANDSFLEE REGION
(By "Associated !rress)
WEINER NEUSTADT, Oct. 6.-
Taking on the appearance of a cit-
adel with the rattle of musketry
and the tramp of troops, the indus-
trial center of Weiner Neustadt, 30
miles south of Vienna, yesterday
took on the preparations for pos-
sible disorders and bloodshed to
follow the meeting of two rival po-
litical factions Sunday.
With the last minute prepara-]
tions of the Social Democrats who
rule Vienna, and the Heimwehr, or
the so-called Home Defense league
of Christian Socialists, who control
the Austrian government, for sepa-
rate propaganda meetings thou-
sands of the inhabitants of the city
fled. Valuable property was being
banked about with sand bags as
against p ossi bl1e bombardment,
while merchants closed their shops
with barricades and the 443 fac-
tories of the city ceased work. Elec-
tric signs were being removed from
the streets.
Under the direction of the chief
of police, troops were firing round
after round in the suburbs in tar-
get practice. The city authorities
commandeered the large municipal
hospital with 300 beds in case it
should be needed, present patients
being evacuated," and all doctors
and physicians available ordered to
be in Weiner Neustadt today.
So far there has already been one
casualty when a Social-Democrat
shot the former burgomaster of
Weissenbach twice through the
chest. Nine Communists were ar-
rested by police on the charge of
seizing the meeting as an occasion
to incite the people into open revo-
lution.

ARRANGEMENTS MADE
FOR11SECOND PROGRAM
IN UNIVERSITY SERIES
HARRISON TO SING TWICE;
HANNS PICK TO PLAY j
VIOLINCELLO1
ABBOT TO BE ANNOUNCER
Furstenberg, Sharfman, C o a c h
Wieman and Regent Beal
Will Give Talks
All arrangements for broadcast-
ing the second "Michigan Night"
radio program of the year to be
given between 7:00 and 8:00 o'clock
Thursday evening, have been made,
it was stated yesterday by Waldo
M. Abbot, of the rhetoric depart-
ment, announcer and program
manager for the series.
Last Thursday marked the first
of a series of 25 programs to be
broadcast this year, the fourth year
they have been presented by the
University. As was the case last
year, they will consist of four five-'
minute talks by members of the
faculty with musical numbers, giv-
en by various campus organizations
alternated between them.
Wieman Will Speak
Included on the second Michigan
program are talks by Dr. Albert C.
Furstenberg, professor of otolaryn-
gology in the medical school, Prof.
I. L. Sharfman, of the econoknics
department, Elton E. "Tad" Wie-
man, head football coach and as-
sistant director of athletics, and
Junius E. Beal, Regent of the Uni-
versity since 1908.
Dr. Furstenberg, a specialist in
ear, nose and throat diseases in the
University hospital, will speak on
"Headaches,"sdealing with their
cause, treatment and how they may
be avoided. This will be a continu-
ation of the series of talks on med-
ical subjects which have been given
by Dr. R. Bishop Canfield and lbr.
Furstenberg in former years.
Sharfman to Talk Politics
Professor Sharfman will deal
with the relation between the pres-
ent political campaigns of Hoover
and Smith and the field of econom-
ics. He will point out the unusual
feature this year in that the two
major parties are catering to big
business instead of flaying as it has
been the practice in past cam-
paigns. Professor Sharfman has
been called into consultation with
many large business organizations
throughout the country to discuss
economic programs and his reputa-
tion in this field assures a most in-
teresting talk.
-Coach Wieman, in his talk, will
explain the purpose in a football
game-what each team is striving
to do and how it attempts to ac-
complish this purpose.
Byrd, Ill, Reaches
Los Angeles Base
(By Associated Press)
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 6-Comman-
der Richard E. Byrd, who next
week will leave on a two-year wa-
ter and air exploration of the Ant-
arctic polar region, arrived here at
2:30 p. in., suffering with a severe
cold accompaniednby a 102-degree
fever. He protested, however, that
he would be "all right tomorrow."
He will join other companions
aboard the ship whaler C. A. Lar-
sen, now enroute from the east

Smith Makes Plans
For Speaking Tour
. In Doubtful States
(By Associated Press)
ALBANY, Oct. 6-Placing the
"solid south" outside of his future-
making plans, Governor Alfred E.
Smith will invade the border states
of Kentucky for the first addressI
of his second campaign tour. Next
Saturday night at Louisville he
will make his seventh speech on
national issues since his notifica-
tion, August 22.
This announcement was made
today by the Democratic presi-
dential nominee at the daily press
conference at the executive man-
sion after he had put in several
hours of the morning on last min-
ute arrangements of his departure
from Albany either Monday or
Tuesday.
After spending a day or two in
New York City in conference with
party leaders, the Governor will'
leave by special train Tuesday
morning for Chattanooga and
Nashville, Tenn., for further con-
ferences with Democratic chief-
tons of that section, but no
speeches.
The time of his arrival in Louis-
ville for his Saturday speech had
not been definitely determined to-
day. Nor has the Governor de-I
cided what the text would be. 1
BNQUET WILL MARK
OPENING OF AIRPORT;
Regent Junius E. Beal Will Speak
At Inaugural Ceremonies
Tuesday Noon
TWO PLANESSTOP DAILY
Regent Junius E. Beal of the Uni-
versity will be the principal speaker
at a banquet which will formally
open the new Ann Arbor airport
Tuesday noon. Prominent business
and professional men from Ann
Arbor and nearby cities will attend.
The new airport is located three
and one half miles from the city,
directly out South State street. Air-
planes land twice daily there to
pick up mail for points all over the
country. Fast service will be avail-
able from Ann Arbor. For exam-
ple, mail leaving here during one
day will reach such places at Chi-
cago, Cleveland or Toledo the same
day. In addition "service to New
York, Los Angeles, Buffalo, Milwau-
kee or Washington, D. C., and many
other distant cities can be complet-
ed the day following its being mail-
ed in Ann Arbor. The rate is five
initial rate being only slightly more
cents for the first ounce and ten
cents for each additional ounce, the
than the regular postal rate for
similar weight.
Within the very near future spe-
cial boxes will be placed in promi-
nent places on the campus and
downtown where air-mail can be
deposited, but the regular mail
boxes will always be available for
air-mail, too. The planes leave here
at 11:15 o'clock in the morning and
at 4:30 in the afternoon.
ADMINISTRATIVE
BOARDSELECTED
Nelson J. Smith, '29, Harlan Cris-
ty, '29, and Cynthia Hawkins, '29,
have been appointed by Paul J.
Kern, '29, president of the Student
council, as student, members of the
Administrative board of the liter-
ary college..
They will sit with the committee
of the Administrative board on
questions of student dishonesty in
classrooms and in examinations.

THE WEATHER
Showers, warmer tonight; fair,
cooler Sunday.
Football Results
Ohio State 34; Wittenberg 0.
Syracuse 32; William and Mary 0.
Indiana 10; Oklahoma 7.
Cornell 34; Niagara 0.
Carnegie 65; Ashland 0.
Brown 32; Worcester Poly 0.
Albion 2; Michigan State 0.
Georgetown 88; Susquehanna 0.
Dartmouth 44: Hobart 0.

TENNESSEE AUDIENCE
HEARS HOOVER'S PLEA
TO DISREGARD PARTY
GREAT AUDIENCE STANDS IN
MUDDY FIELD TO
HEAR SPEECH
APPEALS FOR FAIR PLAY
"No Place For Personal Bitterness,"
Asserts Republican
Nominee
(By W. D. Ragsdale)
(Associated Press Staff Writer)
ELIZABETHTON, Tenn., Oct. 6-
Herbert Hoover appealed to the
people of the south today to lay
aside party prejudices and vote for
a president who represents the
principles that correspond to their
convictions.
Speaking to an immense crowd,
many of whom stood almost ankle
deep in a muddy field, the Republi-
can presidential candidate made
one of the first personal pleas for
support of the normally solid Dem-
ocratic south that a nominee of his
party has made in modern political
history.
Crowd Is Tumultuous
The crowd was tumultuous in its
welcome of a Republican standard-
bearer. He spoke on a platform
built at the foot of a high hill on
the edge of a mountain and the
crowd was massed into a huge fan
shape of humanity below him.
Hundreds of others were seated in
temporary stands which sprawled
across the hill under the shade of
the trees above h'im.
As the candidate's car appeared
on the outskirts of the crowd a roar
went up from the Mountaineers
crowded about the stands. His auto
was parked on the outskirts of the
crowd and he was forced to plough
through the mud of the field to the
speaker's stand.
Launching into his speech, he ex-
panded his views on farm relief,
prohibition and other platform
preparations, but he made no ref-
erence to the religious issue that is
stirring the southern states. Hoov-
er did, however, make an appeal for
fair play and good sportsmanship,
asserting that "we prove ourselves
worthy, worthy of self government
and worthy of confidence as offi-
cials in proportion as we keep these
contests free from abuse, free from
misrepresentation and free from
words and acts that carry regret."
"No Personal Bitterness"
"In a contest like this, there is
no place for personal bitterness,"
he said. "A great attribute of our
political life has been the spirit of
fair play with which fair presiden-
tial contests have been waged in
former years, and the sportsman-
like spirit which we have accepted
the results."
Gift of $350,000
Received By Yale
(By Associated Press)
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Oct. 6-
Yale university, today announced
receipt of a $350,000 gift.
The fund was presented to the
university for the establishment of
an Alfred Cowles foundation for
the study of government, in honor
of the former business manager
and part-owner of the Chicago Tri-
bune, by Alfred Cowles, Jr., of Chi-
cago.

MT. UNION BOWS TO SECOND

CATASTROPHE STALKS IN WAKE
OF DEFILEMENT OF TRADITION

'1
.
r
IY
l
1
Y

By Red EdA
It was an afternoon of ca-
tastrophe. Precedents were estab-
lished and customs were broken.
The same day which had dawned
so nicely and had seen a crowd of
almost 50,000 set a new record for
a season opener in Ann Arbor also
saw Michigan lose its first opening
day game in 40 years, and, perhaps
equally as disastrous, saw that
sanctums, the front door of the
Union passed by a woman.
Then down on the green sward
of the stadium, Ohio Wesleyan's
drum major outplayed the inex-
naia ar3Mnhin renresentative.

after completing one toss that
nearly lost him his headgear.
But to return to details, it was
way back in 1888 that Michigan
last lost an opening game. Chicago
university club won that day by a
score of 26-4. Incidentally the
only other Michigan game that'
year was won from Notre Dame,
26-6.
Twice before that time, Michigan
had lost opening games, in 1881 to
Harvard, 4-0, and in 1883 to Yale,
46-0. In 1881, Michigan had its
most disastrous season also beingj
beaten by Yale, 11-0, and Prince-
ton, 13-4.
Twn times Michigan has nlave l

NEW LOV ELL NEWSPAPER STAND
GRACES ENTRANCE TO ARCADE
Consistent with the program of bright as the Atlantic cable. There
rapid change and progress that has was a great deal of conflicting
characterized the Michigan campus opinion concerning the material.
of the last few years comes the ad- but after a lengthy conference of
vent of a new and much needed all the intelligensia present, it was
improvement, a covered newsstand agreed that it was made of Persian
for Doctor Lovell, the campus poet, mahogany, so much grist was there
scientist and philosopher,-who pos- in the grain. A label on the inside
sesses more degrees than a Fahren- read "from Grand Rapids," but Doc
heit thermometer. denied its manufacture there.
The newsstand has three decks "I am the architect," said Doc
about the exact size of a Great proudly, "and I had a carpenter
Lakes steamship but capable of make it according to my plans and
serving the accommodations of a specifications." If winter coile, he
mail box. As one passes his eye plans to build a lean-to that will
down the structure, he observes protect his wares from the ravages
!that each succeeding deck pro- of the elements.. With such a mon-

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