100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1928 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OCTOBER 5, 1928

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

OCOE , 98iHE MC I ANA L

,1i-:.
,,
/ii l, .

W W IIIA 'wA
IkVA TA
"- * as

U,

'I, -t

.--
----------

CHANGE IN ELECTIONA

Chairman
Will.

Of Judiciary Council
Preside At Class
Elections

BOARD

VACANCY

FILLED

Definite action in regard to the
changes in the method of electing
the chairmen for the various class
activities for women was taken
Tuesday afternoon by the Board of
Directors of the WQmen's league.
The procedure as adopted by the
Board is as follows: The two class
representatives will meet the vice-
president of the class in question
and arrange the nominations.
These will be published at least
two days in advance of the date
set for the election. The chair-
man of the Judiciary council of the
League will be, ex-officio, the pre-
siding officer at the election, and
two other council members will be
the tellers.
It will be customary for the pre-
siding officer to explain the League
rules of, eligibility, and for the
chairman of the event of the year,
preceeding to explain the organi-
zation necessary for the successful
working of that event. The chair
will then .open the nominations
and, although it is commonly not
understood, the nominations may
not be closed until everyone on the
floor has been recognized.;
The Michigan Inter-sorority as-l
sociation and the Women's league
remind the houses and dormitories
of the resolution which they un-
animously passed last spring, dis-
approving any form of campaign
ing between houses or dormitories
or .individuals. The procedure for7
nominations and elections has
never before been defined.
Other business of the Board
meeting Tuesday was the appoint-
ing of Marjory Muffley '30 to fill a
vacancy on the Board as junior
representative.

JACK TALKS TO
CHI DELTA PHIS
Chi Delta Phi, the honorary wo-
men's literary societyheld their
first meeting of the year Wednes-
day night in the Play Room at the
Helen Newberry residence. Pro-
fessor Jack suggested that the so-
ciety support the Inlander, the only
student literary magazine. The
matter was laid on the table and
will be taken up at the next meet-
ing, October 17, when the advisa-
bility of this plan will be discussed
and voted upon.
The business meeting was con-
cluded by reading of manuscripts.
The first try-outs will also be
held at the meeting on October 17.
Art Exposition Shows
Recent Work of Women
The seventh annual Exposition
of Women's Arts and Industries
opened in New York Oct. 1. The
exhibits show what the modern
woman is doing for industrial
America.
Among the outstanding exhibi-
tors is Mrs. Katherine Sunderland
of Danbury, Conn. An ingenious
domestic woman, she invented a
small device for saving the heels
of her own stockings. Finding the
idea of interest to other women
she had it patented and is now a
successful manufacturer as well as
a wife and mother.
Another woman with an envi-
able business career is Mrs. Abbie
B. Prather, now the head of a
large wholesale jewelry establish-
ment. She entered the business
entirely by chance. Returning
from the Orient some years ago,
she brought some strings of beads
which her friends admired great -
ly. She sent for more and sold
them to New York's largest retail
jewelry house. -She now designs
costume jewelry herself.
These are but two of the women
who will be present at the expo-
sition representing every business
and profession from fashions to
philanthropy.

Having spent a week in England,
the Michigan group of the Open
Road tour, under the leadership of
Miss Mary Lytle, director of Betsy
Barbour house, went to Belgium.
The first visit in Belgium was to
the quaint city of Bruges. The
group arrived here just in time to
see the celebration in commemo-
ration of the anniversary of Bel-
gium freedom. The streets were
lighted by torches, and the people
in long lines with joined hands
were dancing old Flemish folk
dances. The charm of Bruges, ac-
cording to Miss Lytle, is. largely
due to the old canals which wind
through the town. They are cross-
ed by bridges so low that one has
to duck one's head to go under
them in a motor boat.
From Bruges, the group went to
Brussels. Here a reception was
given for the party at the Lyceum
club, the patriotic association of
Belgium women, many of whom
are very charming. Among those
whom they met was Madame Sam-
uel, an artist and sculptor, and
the wife of one of Belgium's most
famous sculptors, Charles Samuel.
Madame Samuel invited the group
to her home, where they met her
husband and were shown through
their studios.
Attend Turnfest At Cologne
Cologne, Germany, was the next
place visited. There were many
people in Cologne for a big gymna-
sium meet, called. a, turnfest.
There were fraternity parades in
connection with it, each fraternity
having a different uniform and its
own band. Many of the visitors
were dressed in their native pro-
vincial costumes, so that the whole
effect was very colorful. Here, too,
the group were able to visit the

International Press exhibition, a
wonderful exhibitipn of German
ingenuity and creative ability.
"We met some German students1
in Cologne," Miss Lytle said, ini
speaking of the trip, "who wantedI
to take us by tram to see some of
'the German countryside. Sincet
they said there would be only about
a ten minute walk after we leftf
the tram, we agreed to go, thoughl
we were not dressed for walking.t
But the walk turned out to be notr
a ten minute one, but at least a
ten anile one on a very hot day.t
However, the tea we had at the
quaint little Hansel and Gretel inn
quite repaid us for all our discom-
fort. This inn is built to represent
the witch's house of fairy tale
fame.
Take Rhine River Trip
"Our trip up the Rhine and to
Heidleberg was also fascinating,"
Miss Lytle continued. \."We were
fortunate enough to be in Heidle-
berg on one of the two nights in4
the year that the castle is illum-
inated. The town was completely
dark, and the illumination of thel
castle was done with torches. Af-
ter the torches had been extin-
guished, there was a splendid dis-
play of fireworks from the bridge
over the river."1
From Heidleberg the group went
on an excursion up the Heckar
river. At Necarsteiner some of the
group enjoyed a swim that they
characterize as one of the most
amusing they have ever had. They
had no towels and no place to
dress, so they followed the custom
of the country and dressed on the
bank of the river behind a few
stalks of wheat. Moreover, their
difficulties were increased by the
fact that the water was too shal-

low and the current too swift for
swimming.
Heidleberg Fills Expectations
Miss Lytle says that Heidleberg
is "just like we had expected it
would be. We saw many of the
same scenes, and heard some of
the same music that is in the "Stu-
dent Prince."
On leaving Germany, the group'
went to Geneva, Switzerland. Here
they visited the League of Nations,
and were also shown through the
International Labor office. From
Geneva excursions were made to
the mountains, around the lake,
and to the castle of Chillon.
Paris was the last stop. The
group stayed at the College Mont-
morency, a private school for girls.
Their dining room was a stage
erected for the acting of Sarah
Bernhardt.
Party Visits Petrified Springs
Frqm Paris a short trip was
made to the chateau country. One
of the interesting features of this
trip was a visit to some petrified
springs. The underground caverns
here contain an ancient Roman
cemetery. Excursions were also
made to Versailles, and to the
cathedral at Chartres.
In summing up this part of the
trip, Miss Lytle said,"We were very
fortunate in arriving every place
just in time for the celebration of
some festival or fete typical of the
country. We also enjoyed very
much the friendships we made
with foreign students.

OPEN ROAD TOUR TAKES MICHIGAN STUDENTS TO VISIT
BRUGES, COLOGNE, RHINELAND, HEIDLEBURG, AND PARIS

Coaches Offer Free
Tennis Instruction
At Palmer Courts
Twelve new tennis courts are
ready for use at Palmer Field from
4 until 6 o'clock every Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Miss Col-
by will be there to coach any wo-
men who desire instruction on
Mondays and Fridays, and coaches
urge that as many women use the
courts as possible. There will be
no charge for using them.
W. A. A. points can be earned by
the women playing regularly on
the courts. Fifty honor points will
be awarded for every twelve times
contestants play.

TO OPEN_-HOUSE T~EJ
Freshman women will be tr:
guests of W. A. A. at its open-hous
tea at the new Field House at
o'clock this afternoon, where the
will also be given opportunity t
meet the advisers of women anc
the staff of the physical educatio:
department. Dahcing and bridg
will provide entertainment, and re
freshments will be served.
All entering women, whethe
freshmen or not, are invited to at
tend the tea.

Notices

Any one who is interested in the
making of posters for W. A. A. will
please leave their name at the
women's desk in the Daily office.
The Daily wishes to correct an
omission in yesterday's edition. In

te Wo h Beauty Shoppe
300 S. State St.
(Cor. Liberty and State)
PERMANENT WAVING,
MARCELLING, FACIALS,
MANICURING,
SHAMPOOING
FINGER WAVING
Mrs. N. M. Hitchcock, Mgr.
Open Evenings Dial 2-1410

.;

the announcement of the newly
elected members of Wyvern, junior
honor society, the name of Lorinda

I-
I ii

McAndrews '30 was left out.

l
1

University of Illinois-Athletes
are studied in a psychological lab-
oratory established by the athletic
association with the purpose of
making use of the best materials
on the squads.

dttr ttrp '

t~ llfltltlillltiliillliiiltilitilllfliili1 i i Ililfgili illi llU #1111I1E
SUBSCRIPTIONS FOR
THE NEW YORK THEATRE GUILD
Doctor's Dilemma.....,....Nov. 14
Thei Second Man..........Nov. 19
Ned McCobb's Daughter... .Nov. 28 =
John Ferguson............. Dec. 3
on sale w
~The Print and Book.So
521 E. Jefferson Street Telephone 21081
?ii ti iiiin t1111111111111111111111111111n111111111111 #111111 I t1111 l i u#Iolii i11 illi T

SATISFACTION ASSURED
To Everyone Who Eats At
DREKETE'S
1SUGAR BOWL

x.,41
NE /
"

J

KINNEY SHOES

109 South Main St.

OF QUALITY
AT POPULAR PRICES
$3.98 $4.98

I

Tasty Sandwiches and a cup of Hot
Chocolate or Coffee will just hit the
spot on these cool fall days.

Open, on Friday and Saturday
Nights after 11:30
for Guests at Union Dances
Special Midnight Lunches
Now located at
514 E. Jefferson
Next to Jefferson Apts.
Near State

Combination Fountain

And Table

Service

Such Comfort in

Electrical

Housekeeping

:N'S Velvet Step-
p. Spike Heel.

WOMEN'S T a n K i d
Three -eyelet Tie,
trimmed with Tan Snake.
Spike Heel.

. -

-_-t.

I1 A Fine Assortment

of Choice

Candies

FOR REMOVING,

-

.

MEN'S OXFORDS
Grain, black and tan $5.98
:alk Dress Oxford .$5.98
tyles at... ..$3.98 and $4.98

DUST

)th

THE VACUUM CLEANER

HAS NO EQUAL

sx.
n:
tf 1
at }
w
40 1'

-.'

Try our Delicious Canadian H. & A. Bacon
We also have Virginia Hams.
Our Roast Beef, Pork, Veal and Lamb are
of the very best quality.
We will have Broilers, Roast Chickens, Fowl
and Ducks.

- .

J~IILIDIPI iIy

I

VOGEL BROSI

MARKET

GLIMPSES

into the

339 South Main Street

FALL MODE

RIdin gClasses
JTor University Women,
Classes-Monday and Wednesday at 1:30-3:00-4:30
Classes-Tuesday and Thursday at 1 :30-3 :00-4:30
A twelve-lesson term, riding with instructor,
to be completed by Dec. 1.

VACUUM cleaner attachments make it almost
effortless to remove dust from the hard-to-get-at
places. Powerful suction draws dust into the bag-
instead of spreading dust anew. Everywhere in the
household, dust collects: on bare floors, along pic-
ture molding, onwalls,behind radiators,in furniture
upholstery-but the vacuum cleaner draws it out.
EASY . SPEEDY " 2c AN HOUR
Guaranteed vacuum cleaners may be purchased on con-
venient terms at any office of

ILI
-f
1-

I
I

Fall Fashion has brought forth
many new notes. New features
which we present in an advance
showing of fall models. Of fabrics
-in colors and styles that are des-
tined to be the leaders for Fall.
Recent arrivals-from the 'smartest
couturiers-,beautifully made. In a
wide assortment of models and
types. $19.75 and up

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan