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January 25, 1929 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1929-01-25

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ESTABLISHED
1 890

ICY

1r

ii ai1&

MEMBER
ASOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXXIX, No. 92. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 1929

EIGHT PAGES

FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED NELSON BRIEFS
CE TL BACHER AND VERMAN WORK OVER AIR
FMR SIENTIFIC W9RK

DOWN TO BUSINESS1
1 GRAPPLE BILS
SENATE TO CONSIDER CRUISER
BILL SENT OVER
BY HOUSE
VARE CASE CLOSED
IN SENATE SESSION
House Displays Usual Lineup Of
Wet And Dry
Factions
(By Associated P'css)
WASHINGTON, Jan. 24.-The
Senate got own to real business
today with the cruiser building bill
which the House sent over a year
ago, while the House prepared to
grapple with the $24,000,00 pro-
hibition enforcement proposal
which the Senate inserted in the
deficiency appropriation bill earlier
this week.
It was clear that consideration
of both of these measures would
be attended by much oratory. A
mention in the House that the Sen-
ate had returned the deficiency bill
resulted in request from various
quarters for information as to
when and how the question would
be handled, presaging a renewal in
that branch of Congress of the pro-
hibition argument which has been
occupying )the Senate on recent
days.
Borah Opens Debate
The preliminary expressions
from House members indicated an
unusual lineup, with wet and drys
grouped in some instances in favor
of the Senate plan, and in other
quarters opposing it. Secretary
Mellon has disapproved of such an
increase-in dry funds until a survey
could be made.
Senator Borah of Idaho, chair-
man of the foreign relations com-
mittee, advanced the suggestion at
the opening of the debate on the
cruiser bill that it should conain a
restatement of international law
on rights of neutrals at sea. He at-
tributed "uneasiness' over naval
power in theuworld through the loss
of a clear understanding on this
point.
The House dealt with minor bills
on its consent calendar today,
leaving to the ways and means
committee the principal work on
that side of the capital, and this
committee listened to testimony by
a succession of witnesses interest-
ed in the tariff legislation for agri-
cultural products. The committee
was told that the farming indus-
try should receive protection equal
to that of any other industry. The
question of the duty on livestock
occupied much of the time allotted
to the agricultural schedule which
the committee is considering.
The bill to reapportion the mem-
bership of the House was before
the Senate for a brief period before
the cruiser bill was called up as
the unfinished business. Senator
Vandenberg of Michigan, asked
that it be considered and on a roll
call, regarded as something of a
test, his motion was adopted by a
vote of 53 to 23.
HARVARD MAN SPEAKS
N FRENOHMAN'S WORKSI
IN LECTURE YESTERDAY
Chataubriand Is Inependent Of
External Reality, Says
Paul Hazard

I :>x:. {: :.....

Engagement With Bismuth And
Atom Distribution Wins Coffin
Annual Awards
Charles A. Coffin fellowships
have been awarded to eight young
men preparing to engage, or al-
ready engaged, in research dealing
with various problems relating to
electricity, physics, or physical
chemistry, among whom are listed
two men from the University.
IRobert F. Bacher, '26, and Lal C.
Verman, '27, are Michigan's rep-
resentatives who have been award-
ed the fellowships provided by the
Charles A. Coffin Foundation as a
means of encouraging and foster-
ing fundamental research among
students of engineering and kin-
dred sciences.
Research in connection with
Bismuth and the distribution of
atoms is occupying Bacher, who is
working for the degree of Doctor
of Philosophy at the University.
Verman is occupied at Cornell uni-
versity with investigation regard-
ing the polarization of short radio
waves as affected by weather con-
ditions.
Theses awards are considerably
at a premium, since only eight are
offered to university men each
year. Michigan is also extremely
fortunate in that two of her stu-
dents have advanced to the stage
of investigation where research is
of so much fundamental impor-
tance.
This award is striven for annual-
ly. Both men hope to complete'
their present problem in research

J. Raleigh Nelson
Professor of English in the Engi-
neering college, who last night
discussed his department on the
regular Michigan Night program.
DISPATCH RECALLS
i- - -
Six Of Crew Are Injured, Four Are
Seriously 111, And Remainder
Are Exhausted
BRIDGE IS WASHED AWAY!

soon, considerable time having:
been put on investigation already. I( y imcatcd Pr='-)
NEW YORK, Jan. 24.--Thirty-
two men of the sea were home-'
ward bound tonight, snatched from
death almost after all right to hope
was gone. }
They were the crew of the Ital-
ian freighter Florida, storm-wreck-
ed 800 miles at sea and they were
alive only because the courage of
seamen from the land their coun-
Play Production To Produce Plays tryman, Columbus, discovered was
Written By Students This joined with the mysterious power
Afternoon. . of.radio to.-determine the irection.
of an object out of sight.
SHOWING TO BE PRIVATE Six of the crew were seriously in-,
jured, four others were very ill, and
all were exhausted from their fight'
Inaugurating a new era in stu- for .life. But they were alive, and
dent dramatics at the University, that was almost more than anyone
six student-written, student-pro- would have thought could be their
duced one-act plays will be pre ' lot who could have seen their
sented at private performances !plight yesterday as Captain George;
pFried of the rescue ship America
this afternoon and this evening in described it today in his first ac-
the laboratory auditorium of Uni- count of the rescue in a dispatch
versity Hall by Play Production to the Associated Press.
classes. Three years ago, Captain Fried,
Through the productions of the then commander of the President
Roosevelt, proved himself a color- I
plays today, the competition will ful writer of sea epics when he
be narrowed down to three or four wirelessed to the Associated Press
plays, which will be shown later in the story of the rescue of 25 men
public. The six being presented at from the foundering British
this time were selected from 31 freighter Antinoc, and today he
told an equally stirring tale of skill
that were entered at th e beginnig and courage victorious over the
of the contest. rampant forces of angry nature.
The judges are Prof. Louis I. The America, Captain Fried said,
Bredvold, Prof. J. M. O'Neill, and was inbound from Europe when it
Prof. Frederick W. Peterson. picked S. O. S. calls from both the
Florida and the American tanker
The performances today are ex Dannedaike last Tuesday morning.
clusively for the authors and their The America was 350 miles away,
Ie s ts but when Captain Fried deter-
The plays this afternoon will bemined that although other ships
"Side Show" by Helen Adler, '30, were nearer only one had a radio
and "My Man" by Jerome Mc- direction finder, he swung from his
Carthy, '29. At the evening per- course and pushed toward the belt
formance, starting at 7:30 o'clock of windy fury in which the
will be presented "Believe It or Not" freighters lay disabled.
by Edward Heyman, Grad., "Pas- The Dannedaike subsequently)
sion's Progress" by R. Leslie Askern, pulled off for Bermuda under a
'29, "Outside This Room" by Doro- jury rig, jointly reporting that it
thy Ackerman, '29, and "The Join- had apparently called the turn on
ers" by Arthur Hinkley, '29. Davey Jones this time.
FLO EXPRESSES WISH TO FLY TO HAVANA IN TWENTY
HORS STEADY WITHOUT CARBON MONOXIDE GAS

FOURTEENTH RADIO
NIGHT IN CLUDES
NEUROLOGY IALK
DR. JOHN GARVEY DECLARES'
ALCOHOL MAY BE RELIEF
FROM STRAIN
MUSICAL PROGRAM
GIVES LUTE SONGS
Prof. Ned Dearborn Gives Address
On Fur Bearing Animals
Of Michigan
"In neurotic individuals,"rsaid
Dr. John Garvey, professor of 1
neurology in the medical school
and specialist of nervous diseases
n the University hospital, who
was the first speaker on the four-
teenth Michigan Night radio pro-
gram, broadcast last night over
station WJR, "alcholic addiction is
but the expression of a desire for
relief from a strain which cannot
be borne."
Dr. Garvey, who was the first
speaker on the radio programj
spoke on "The Effect of Alcohol on
the Nervous System," and explain-
ed in some detail the factors which
result in permanent injury to the
body.
Prof. Ned Dearborn, zoologist in
'he School of Forestry and Conser-
vation, was the next to address the
radio audience on "Michigan's Fur
Bearing Animals." Professor Dear-
born said that Michigan ranks
hird of all the states in the United
States in the production of furs.
The finest of the fur bearers have
been exterminated, including the
fisher, the marten, and the wol-
verine, emblem of the state.
Beaver Increases
The beaver, otter, and raccoon, re-
dticed almost to the vanishing
oont, are now gradually reappear-
ing, Professor ,Dearborn showed.
These animals, as well as many
others which live in this state, will
continue to increase in number if
protected, and will thus form a
valuable source of income for
trappers in Michigan.
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, of the
English department in the .Engi-
neering college, spoke next on the
publication work done by the Engi-
neering Research committee. "In
October, 1925." said Professor Nel-
son, "a publications committee
was created to see that whenever
contributions of major importance
resulted from the study of research
projects, they should be edited and
issued in a form which would give
them permanent value, and issued
whenever they would be of service.
Since January, 1926, eleven bul-
letins, two circulars and four re-
prints have been published and
distributed." Professor Nelson said
that the subjects covered by the
bulletins ranged all the way from
investigations of charcoal and pig-
iron to a manual of flight test pro-
cedure.
Fries Outlines Plan
One of the co-editors of the Dic-
tionary of Early Modern English,
Prof. Charles C. Fries, of the Eng-
lish department, explained some-
thing of the work being done on
the dictionary, its compilation and
purpose.
As the nmusical portion of the
program, Dr. Norman L. Capener,
of the medical school, accompanied
by Arthur E. Evans, of the French
department, on the lute, presented
several selections of Elizabethan

songs. Phillip Culkin also sang
three solo groups on this program,
and was accompanied by Louise
Nelson of the School of Music at
the piano.
MICHIGAN MANAGEMENT
INVITES BAND TO SHOW
Members of the University band
were guests of the Michigan the-
ater at the first performance of the
show last night. The Illini Singing
band of the University of Illinios
is appearing on the program there
for the remainder of the week, and
because the management thought
the attraction would be of interest
to the band members, they invited
them to be guests at the perform-
ance.
Seats were reserved in the front
part of the theater, and the band
mn l...a-r ,1h r pr.Tlfl in iinifnrmn

BORAH DEBATES I Y ST IS PALLBEARER
CRUISER BILL AT RITES OF ALUMNUS,
HENRY KILLILEA, '85L
Killilea Played Center In Football
Here Preceding Advent Of
I ..Coach Yost

.

Fielding H. Yost, director of in-
: z I ercollegiate athletics at the Uni-
versity, will be an honorary pall-
bearer at the funeral of Henry J.
Killilea, '85L, one of the founders
of. the American baseball league,
and an ardent Alumni supporter of
the University, who died at his
home in Milwaukee, Wednesday.
The funeral is to be held Saturday
morning, and Coach Yost will bel
representing the University and the
"M" Club.
While at the University Killilea
played center on the team that met
all three of the Big Thl.ree elevens
in one week. After leaving the
Senator Borah institution he took an interest in
Who asked for a restatement of professional baseball, although he
international law on rights of never lost his amateur standing.
neutrals at sea, in debate on He became, outstanding in the rise
of the national sport, being a
,ruiser bill today. I founder, along with the Mack
brothers, Harold Comiskey, and
Ban Johnson, of the American
league. In 1903 he became presi-
INQUEST Rdent of the Boston Red Sox. A
few years ago he purchased the
Milwaukee Brewers, a minor league
club.
While interested in professional
AT TRAGEDY SCENE baseball Mr. Killitea continued to
be a supporter of the University.
It is understood that le helped fi-
Officials Order Interurban Pilots nance the schooling of William Hes-
To Slacken Speed Not Exceeding ton and Archie Hahn, famous
10 Miles An Hour Michigan grid star and sprinter,
__-- respectively..

COLLEGE,36 1O21
BARLEY IS HIGH-POINT MAN
WITH FOUR BASKETS AND
SIX FREE THROWS
CROWD OF IOOO SEE
EIGHTH B TEAM WIN
Lovell Is Other Star Of Game,
Making Three Field Goals
For Second Honors
By Morris Quinn
DETROIT, Mich., Jan. 24 .--Mich -
iganOs Junior Varsity basketball
team added another victim to its
growing list by outclassing Detroit
City college tonight in Central high
school gymnasium 36-21. Approxi-
mately 1,000 people saw the teams
in action. The Wolf Cubs display-
ed unusual accuracy throughout
the first half, when led by Barley
they totalled 10 goals from the field
and four times from the foul line
to lead the Tartars, 1927-28 Michi-
gan intercollegiate champions, 24-
15 at half time.
City college drew first blood when
Captain Evans counted on a close
in shot shortly after the game be-
gan, he was fouled in making the
basket and added another point in
two tries from the foul line. Barley
followed with a free throw and a
basket for the Wolverines to tic
the count.
Lead See-Saws
The lead see-sawed back and
forth until the teams were tied
again at 9-all, when Schecter sent
the Tartans into the fore with a
difficult overhead shot, but the
Michigan sharp-shooters found
their range and forged into a sub-
stantial lead which they held
throughout the rest of the game.
Except for the first few minutes
of the contest when Schecter man-
aged to break through for difficult
short shots, the Maize and Blue
defense held the City college quin-
tet Well in check, permitting their
opponents to score only six times
from the field.
Barley Stars
Barley at runing guard, played a
flashy game for the Wolverines and
was high point man of the contest
with four field goals and six free
throws to his credit. Lovell played
a strong defensive game and help-
ed himself to six counters. The
other points were well distributed,
every Wolverine bagging at least
lone field goal. Captain Evans and
Schecter were the chief threats
for City college, each accounting
for seven points..
THE LINEUPS

SIGNALS ARE INADEQUATE
BELLEVUE. O., Jan. 24.-Investi-
gation into the collision of an in-0
terurban and a bus near here,
Tuesday, which resulted in 19
deaths progressed today as three I
more of the bodies lying in the
Bellevue undertaking establish-
ments were identified. Tickets Should Be Purchased Now
The public utilities commission So That Booth Arrangements
at Columbus ordered cars of the May Be Made
Lake Shore Electric Railways com-
pany, operators of the interurban FAVORS EXPECTED TODAY
which figured in the crash, to slow
to a speed of ten miles an hour at An all-campus ticket sale for.
the dangerous double crossing 1 those on campus who have not
where the wreck occurred. In addi- h
tion, officials of the Lake Shore purchased their tickets to the 1930
Electric Railways company, the J-Hop, which will be held on the
New York Central, and Wheeling night of February 8, will take place
and Lake Erie railroads, all of between 1.30 and 5 o'clock today at
whom have tracks at the crossing, the side desk of the Union, accord-
were ordered to appear at Colum- ing to George S. Bradley, '30, tickets
bus February 4 to show cause why i r. A dey, '30 tets
additional warning signals should Chairman. A few tickets are left,
not be erected. hBradley said, and they will be sold
Chief of Police Charles North to- to the first comers.
night was still puzzled over the "Tickets should be purchasedj
purported confession of Teddy immediately so that booth arrange-
O'Browski of Brooklyn, N. Y., who ments may be made before the ex-
a few hours before his death from amination period," said Philip B.:
injuries received in the accident, Allen, '30E, booth chairman. Allen
told a vague story of. committing pointed out that there are sev-
bank robberies in Detroit and San eral fraternities that have not
Francisco. His left arm bore two yethanded in lists ofdtheir mem-
bullet wounds which he said were hers for booths, and that the
suffered during the Detroit robbery choice booths will soon be gone as
in which two of his three compan- I they are being parceled out accord-
ions were killed, but neither De- ig to the receipt of thoe lists. In-
troit nor San Francisco police had dependents who wish to be in cer-
any records of holdups which he tam of the independent booths
might have staged. His finger must get in touch with the booth
prnswere taken and he will be chairmen today, he said, or, they
prints cannd hec will be put into one that the com-
photographed for a further check. mittee chooses. The chairmen are
-----D. B. Barrett, '30E, R. E. Neis, '30E,
THEORY OF EINSTEIN rind P. H. Farrar, '30E, for the engi-
neer independent booths, and L.
ENABLES TRIP TO MON I;Pennington, '30, J. Fardkin, '30, H.
-H. Frisinger, '30, and M. F. Thomas,

i
f
(
;j
.
i
1
E
:
.;
,
.
;,

Michign
Downing, rf..........
Slagle, If ...... . . ........
W einstein, If ............
fBalsamo, if..... . .
Dougal, c............
Cushing, rg.
Barley, rg .. ...
Lytle, rg
Lovell, lg............

G
2
.I
2
1
4
0
3

Totals..............15
City College
Evans, Capt., rf ........ 1
Marshall, if...........0
Schecter, If 3
Wenzel, if.............0
Pollakowski, c .......... 1
Humprys, c..........
Kaufman, rg..........0
Crane, rg............. 0
Wachter, ig ....,... 0
I Sieger, lg ..........0
Totals .......... ,,. 6G

0
0
0
()j
0
0
6
0
0
F
5
r)
(1
0
0
1
([
2
(1
0
9

T
4
4
2
0
4
2
14
0
6
36
T
7
0
7
0
2
3
0
2
0
21

Dr. H.

II. Sheldon, Of N. Y. U.
Is Enthusiastic
Over Projevt

'30, for the literary independents.
Independents ,rom other schools
are to get in touch with Allen as
to their plans.

"hateaubriand spent ouly a
hundred days in America, and
while it is certain that he saw
Washington and Philadelphia, it is
equally certain that he did not take
a trip down the Mississippi and
tbat he never saw Natchez, in the
vicinity of which the action of his
novel 'Atala' takes place," declared
Prof. Paul Hazard, exchange pro-
fessor at Harvard and recently ap-
pointed professor at the College de
France, in his lecture yesterday
afternoon in the Romance Lang-
ga ages building.
'For Chateaubriand there were
two sorts of reality: first, the every-
(day and rather sad sort which we
see around us all the time; and
second, the splendid reality of
dreams and visions and the imagi-
nation.
He chose to portray the second
inftonroiect. upon thet universe

i
IA !
{
. t
1
r
.l
i
f
i

(Exclusive To The Daily)
"It is my hope that I can get toj
Havana in anywhere from 18 to 22j
hours of steady flying," said Lieu~
tenant Leonard S. Flo, local aviator, t
in an interview yesterday .regard-
ing his proposed non-stop flight tol
Cuba which he will again attemptI
in February. The flight which was
originally expected to have taken I
place today from Walkerville, Ont., t
has been postponed as the result
of delays due to weather eond-
tions.
This is the third time that Lieut.t
Flo is attempting the non-stop
flight of approximately 2,000 milesr
as a bird flies, his other two at-
tempts having resulted in failure

Upon examination of the plane
while ,he was yet in Florida, Flo
discovered that a cap had blown
off' the exhaust, pipes and that for
some time he had been flying with'
the fumes of the carbon-monoxide
exhaust blowing into his face. The
fact that the taste of the cafein at
this time became exceedingly pro-
nounced mislead him into think-
ing that he had taken an over-
(lose of the stimulant.
"Aviators," said Flo, "do not take
Scafeini as a general rule before they
take a long hop; they merely take
a dose or two along with them just
in case they begin to feel drowzy."
The only reason, he explained for
his taking the stimulant was that,
he had had scarcely any sleep thel

By Associae'1 he<. 'IFavors for the Hop are expected
NEW YORK, Jan. 24-the most to arrive today, announced Alan
g field of experiet Bovard, '30, favors chairman after
that could be opened to man lies a consultation with Wally Wallace
behind Einstein's new theory that of Balfour who received the con-
electricity and magnetism are re- tract for the favors. It is likely
lated to gravitation, says Dr. k . that they will be given out tomor-
Sheldon, head of the department of row, Bovard announced, promising
physcs o Ne For unversty. to annmounce the fact in The Daily
tomorrow if such a plan were pos-
"Such things," said Dr. Sheldon, sible.I
"as keeping airplanes aloft with- lAnnouncement of the second or-
out engines or material support, as chestra will be made tomorrow, the
stepping out of the window into music chairman said. Three well-
the air without fear of falling, or known orchestras are now being
of making a trip to the moon, as I considered.
far as hindrance of gravitation is '
concerned, are avenues of iyvesti- SHEPARD TAKES LEAVE '
gation suggested by this theory.EE
"For it gives us the only link that FOR SECOND SEMESTER
has been missing in our theories1
of relations of electricity, heat, en- i Prof. John F. Shepard, of the
ergy, light, space, time, gravitation psychology department, will take
and matter. If it stands up as a a sabbatical leave of absence for
proof that electricity and gravita- the second semester, it was an-

Referee - Thompson; Umpire-
Remmert.
MATTHEW TERMS
FOSSIL OF YORE
AS TROUBLESOME
Ape Man Of Java Thought To Be
Missing Link Long
Sought
f"Ape Man of Java," the ancient
Pithecanthropus Erectus, whose
fossil remains nearly forty years
ago started the discussion as to
whether he was the "missing-link,"
has now been classified as a great
mischief maker by W. D. Matthew,
professor of paleontology ate the
University of California, in "Na-

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