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January 22, 1929 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-01-22

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Jr

tt

4 tfi ",arc

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

Vol. XXXIX. No. 89. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1929

EIGHT PAGE4

I

I

I

I

ICHIGAN ASSUMES

LEAD

IN

BIG TEN

'

BADGERS INF [ICT
INITIAL UPSET ON
BOILERMAKERIVE
OVERFLOW CROWD WATCHES
WISCONSIN TRIUMPH
AT LAFAYETTE
FINAL SCORE IS 31 TO 26
Michigan Takes Conferenee Lead;
Murphy Subdued By Kowalczyk,
Star Cardinal Guard
(By Assecited Press)
LAFAYETTE, Jan. 21.-A band of
giants from Wisconsin smeared
the defeat sign on Purdue's speedy
basketball'team for the first time
in the Big Ten basketballtcham-
pionship campaign tonight by a
score of 31 to 26, before an over-
flow crowd of 7,000 spectators.
Trho dtfa f m bd tht B iler-

I

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ES

CTIIO

F

MUSiCA[SCHIOOL
WITH UNIVERSITY
JAMES EDMONSON APPOINTED
NEW DEAN OF SCHOOL
OF EDUCATION
NAME FUTURE LECTURERS
Professor Taylor Of Princeton Will,
Replace Professor Campbell
Next Semester

President Resigns

NEXT PRESIDENT
TO DECIDE FATE
OF. U.__COLLEGE
REGENTS DEFINITELY DECIDE
TO BUILD DORMITORY
IN 1930
ILTTLE'S WISH GRANTED

P DNT'SRESIGNATION GIVEN
UNANIMOUS VOlEBYBOARD IF'
HGENIS; HEGRET IS EXPRESSED
OFFICIALS EXPRESS HIGHEST PRAISE
FOR CHARACTER AND STANDARDS
OF PRESIDENT LITTLE
Unanimoudy accepting the resignation of President Clarence
Cook Little under the terms included in his letter of resignation
sent to each regent last Saturday, the Board of Regents of the
University last night passed the following resolution:
"In accepting the resignation of President Little the Board
of Regents expresses the most most profound regret.
"His high ideals of educational standards, his initiative, his
constructive aspirations, his frankness, courage, and sincerity have
made the severing of relationships a heart-felt loss to us all.
"We trust that the future may have for him the richest re-

Regents Sawyer,
Dean Ruthven'
Legislative

Beal, Clements,
To Carry On
Program

X

makers from a tie for first place in Embodiment of the School of
the race with Michigan and sent Music and its complete administra-
them into a tie for second place tive organization into the Univer-
with Wisconsin, each having a sity as an integral part, and ap-
record of five victories and one de- pointment of Prof. James B. Ed-
feat. Michigan is the undisputed -monson of 4he-Shool o f- ation
leader with four straight triumphs , as dean of the school were included
Tonight's battle was fiercely in the business transacted by the
fought from the first tip-off with Board of Regents last night.
the lead alternating several times In the past the School of Music
Purdue grabbed an early lead but has existed as a separate corpora-
the Badgers, playing a bang-up de- tion with a loose conection exist-
fensive game and with Hank Kow- ing between it and the University
alczk "sewing up" "Stretch" Mur- proper. The new plan will include
phy, Purdue's scoring ace soon the School of Music among the
overtook them to lead 15 to 13 at regular schools of the University.
the half. Purdue took the lead Under the new arrangement, the!
again in the middle of the second finances and entire working of the
half, but once again Wisconsin School of Music will be directly
,mashed through to lead and to under the University just as the sit-
wind uation is at present with other
Kowalczyk's guarding of Murphy, schools and colleges of the Uni-
and the fast offensive play of Ten- versity.
hopen, rangy center, Foster's floor Prfsor Edmonson iatesn
work and passing and Doyle's de- chairman of the executive commit
fense fUatured Wisconsin's play, tee of the School of Education
while Harmeson and Lyle, a di- which has been in active charge of
minutive forward, starred for the resination of thomer oean llanc
Bovileirnm:kcl's. jrsgaino IomrDa la
Bdrmk1.S. Whitney at the close of the lastj
~ . NSemester.
BLOOMINGTON, Jan. 21-Indi- n acdditio mi, the Regents an -
a;1 climbed over Minnesota here nornced the coming of Prof. Ed-
tonight by a score of 41-22 to en- ward Ayres Taylor of Princeton
ter into a triple tie for fourth place university to take the place of Prof.
in Conference standing along with GaJ Campbell of the English de-
Northwestern and Illinois. It was partment during his leave of ab-
the Hoosier's second victory in five sence next semester when he will
Big Ten games this: season and be at Harvard university. It was
MDinnesota's fifth defeat in as many also announced that Prof. C. G.
starts. Burns of the University of Edin-
Iburgh, a well known authority in.
the field of political science, will
H V S AR spenda week in Ann Arbor next
spring, delivering a number of lec-
spring. Moreover, Prof. Ernest.
Rhyes,editor of Everyman's library,'
and Prof. Myer Luebke, German
lecturer, have also been invited tol
give a number of lectures here in4
the near future.
A telegram addressed, to Presi-
By .",u(,0,ct Prss)dent Little from Commnander Byrd,
Hv A sac Ts leader of the well known Antarctic
Hoover Special En Route to Mi- expedition, an cantaining the fol-i
ami, Jan, 221.--President-elect Her- lowing nessage was read at the
bert Hooveritraveled southward to- meeting: "Have made Gould sec-
day through Virginia and North ond in command on ice. He is a'
Carolina, bound for a month's rest corker. Happy New Year.-Byrd."
in Miami-his last chance for a Establishment of - Dupont dej
vacation .before he enters the Nemours fellowslp in, chemistry
White House on March 4. and the announcement of the con-,
He intends to make the most ofI tinuation of the Detroit Edison fel-'
t, too. After his close confine- Ilowship in chemical engineering
ment in Washington during the completed the business of the;
last two weeks and the conference meeting.
with hundreds of office seekers and ------t--.
.advisors, the prospects of quiet, 0 TUNCIL TO HEAR
-lonely days in Florida Keys, fish-
ing for barracuda, sailfish, and NATIONAL REPORT
.,t ...._.. .....t.....+.M. .~. m nr~ i~tvr hl

Postponement of plans for the
University college until the views
of the successor to President Clar-
ence Cook Little are known and
definite decision'to build the wom-
en's dormitory in 1930 as an experi-
ment in the use of dormitories in
the University constituted part of
the business at the meeting of the
Board of' Regents of the University
last night. In addition, the appoint-
ment of Regent Walter H. Sawyer
as chairman and Regent Junius E.
Beal, Regent William L. Clements,
and Alexander G. Ruthven. dean of
administration, as members of a
legislative committee to take
charge of the present legislative
program, was made.
The action on the University col-
lege as well as the appointment of
1 the committee are in accordance
with requests made by President
I Little in his letter of resignation
tendered the Regents.
Suspension of plans for the Uni-
versity college will halt the work
of a number of special committees
of the faculty engaged in develop-
ing details of the plan. No work
whatever will be done until the
sentiments of the next president
of the University are known.
In a statement issued regarding
the building of the dormitory, the
regents reiterated their stand taken
several days ago at a special meet-
ing when they set forth the matter
of financial arrangements as the

HOP INDEPENDENTS
All independents who are going
to attend the J-Hop will meet at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 316 of
the Union;to plan for their booths,
announced Phillip B. Allen, booth
chairman, "It is very important
that all independents be there as
this, will be the only meeting of
the kind," he emphasized.
The ticket sale of the remaining
tickets will continue today between
1:30 and 5:30 o'clock at the. side
desk of the Union, according to
George Bradley, ticket chairman.
"There are .but few tickets left,"
Bradley said, "and those who are
planning on attending the Hop
ought to buy immediately in order
to be able to make all arrange-
ments accordingly."
"The floor committeemen will
assemble tomorrow night at the
Union for a brief meeting," an-
nounced Wilfred Orwig, chairman
of the committee. All of the com-
mitteemen should be present as
this will probably be the only meet-
ing until the night of the Hop, lie
said.
"Plans are progressing satisfac-
torily in all departments," said
Harry Wallace, '30, general chair-
man. "We expect to have an in-
teresting announcement within a
few days," he added.
GIFT0OF ALUMNUS1

Dwards."
In his letter to the regents,
President Little gave as his rea-
sons for his resignation his belief
that his '"methods of handling
situations dealin'g with interests of
private donors, political interest,
local interest, and alumnae intef-
ests, are not consistent with
policies which the Board of Re-
gents deems wise" and that .he
hopes "to be more effective in sci-
entific research and teaching than
in administration."
In accordance with President
Little's request, the resignation
will take effect Septemebr 1, 1929,
and he has been given a leave of
absence from June 20, 1929, to Au-
gust 31, 1929.
From prominent alumni, news-
papermen, graduated members of
honor societies, and well known
persons all over the country The
Daily has received numerous state-
ments and requests for news con-
cerning the rumored resignation
of President Little.
[ Comprehensive editorial com-
meat on the resignation of
President Little will be found'
on page four.
President Clarence Cook Little
was born in 1888. He was gradu-
ated from Harvard in 1910 with an
A.B. degree, and received a master
of science degree in 1912. He held
various posts at Cambridge before
assuming the presidency of the
University of Maine in 1922.
Dr. Little aroused strong an-
tagonism and equally vigorous sup-
port soon after he came to the Uni-
versity of Michigan in 1925 to take
the place of Marion Leroy Burton,
who died while in office. Little ad-
vocated several new forms of edu-
cational methods, a sane form of
birth control, a ban on the stu-
ddent use of automobiles, denounce-
merit of the D.A.R blacklist, closer
contact with -a1umni by means of
an Alumni college, a University
college, and other things.
In his inaugural address, he
mentioned several things which he
later saw as accomplished facts or
as much discussed subjects. His
first try was at the installation of
a Freshman week, whereby enter-
ing students were given a chance
to become acclimated toUniversity
life and to the city before- they
started classwork. This was first
put into use in the fall of 1927, and
proved a happy thing. Under suc-
cessful guidance, it was used again
last fall, and proved to be one of
the greatest innovations in modern
education, it is claimed. Entering
students come to the university one
week before classes begin, and dur-
ing that waek classify, register,
are examined, and become a part of
Ithe university life.
In the spring of 1926, the first
rumors of the later widesnrad diR-

1
Ir
l

cause for the postponement. A
number of changes are being made
in the plans by Shirley Smith, see-
retary of the University in con-
ference with the architects. The
Regents further stated that theyl

President 'Clarence Cook Lillle

E
x
I
.!
A
:

Who last night tendered and had accepted his resignation as ( have no intention whatsoever of
president of the University. President Little's letter which was sent to ! abandoning the plans for the dor-
each of the Regents is hereby published with President Little's per- mitory but that postponement is L DY 1111
mission: their only course in mind.
Dear Regent -:
For some tTe two (Ws have become increastugly appareii: OTTONVAY DENIES "There is a very great signifi-.
First:--That my methods of handling situations dealing with in- FRICTION REPORT cance i this gift from an alumnus
terests of private donors, political interests, "local" interests hoping to stimulate in a concrete
and alumnae interests, are not consistent with policies which Denial of the report that friction way the students' interest in the1
the Board of Regents deems wise, . with the alumni bodies of the past," declared President Clarence
oecond:--That I shall, Ihljope, be more effective iiiscie1tiic re-estate or nation had anything to do Cook Little to the small. group
search and teaching than in administration. with the rendering of Dr. Clarence gathered in the library yesterday
I therefore request that my resignation be accepted to take t Cook Little's resignation, presentedatern the resea
September 1, 1929 and that I be given a leave of absence from June 20, at the regular meeting of the Napoleon's signatures to the Uni-
1929 to August 31, 1929, or before that if the Regents desire it. Board of Regents last night, was versity by Orla B Taylor, '86
I furtek twthig; mphatically made late yesterdayvB
er as wo ingsPresident Little emphasized the
First':-That the University College be established only if u re afternoon by E J. Ottoway, of Port ifactsht an alumnus had had
Board of Regents is whole-heartedly in favor of the principlesalumni association, in a special I great interest in his University and
and if it is approved by the Deans or if my successor is definitely telephone communication to The had worked out the idea and his'
in favor of it and will personally sponsor it. Only in these Daily. way of presenting it.,
ways can it have a fair chance of success. IIt would seem need- ily.Ottoway declared that Dr. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Ford, of De-
lessly hartdon it students to launch it nder circumstances Little has had the complete confi- troit, very close friends of the
likey todoomit t faiure.dence of the alumni association at donor, Mr. Orla B. Taylor, also of
8econd:---That the present legislative program be j)lacel in charge all times, and that its ten-year Detroit, and Mr. Louis D. Bolton,
of H hn n of Adiinist rationat inarfr tePro eidrent'n f_7 --l Inrl of--1----- , .,-of.a. - ,i'a M- ,- .

'P .

other aristocrats or more numme
inhabitants of the Gulf Stream,
hold the strongest appeal for Mr.I

Business scheduled for the .sec-
ond regular meeting of the Inter-}
F..r,.,.v,+. n ~ ...mu - -,nrcit

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