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October 04, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-04

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ESTABLISHED
1890

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1928

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FOUR TA LKS PLANNED
NIGHTRADIOPROGRAMl
FIRST OF SERIES WILL GO ON
AIR OVER STATION WJR-
WCX TONIGHT
VARSITY BAND WILL PLAY
Smith, Yost, Brown, and Pollock
' Slated for Speeches On
Student Topics.
"Michigan Night" on the .radio
will again be heard when thedfirst
of the series to be held this year
will be broadcast between 7 and 8
o'clock tonight through the court-
esy of stations WJR-WCX, "The
Good-Will Station" on Detroit.
Tonight's program, which will
consist of talks by four members of

C all For Tryouts
Is sued By Union
Two additional Union appoint-
ments and announcement of a call
for sophomore tryouts were made
yesterday by William E. Nissen,
'29, president of the Union.:
James Thayer, '30, and William
Spencer, '30, are the two appoin-
tees. They were named assistant
recording secretaries. At the same
time Nissen announced that under-
classmen, particularly sophoniores,
interested in Union activities should
report at the student offices in the
Union any afternoon this week.
The various Union committee
chairmen, appointed last week, are
now beginning to ask for sopho-
more tryouts who may by working:
this year at the Union become eli-
gible for committee appointments
next fall, and be considered the
following spring for the higher Un-
ion offices which are now elective.

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e University f acuity ana a pro-
im of music by the 'Varsity'
nd, is the first of twenty-five to
given during the present college1
ar. The University programs
i be broadcast between the
urs of 7 and 8 on 'I'hursday
ghts instead of upon resday'
ghts as previouslyannounced.
Band Will Begin Program.;
rhe series will be ushered into
e air by the 'Varsity' band play-;
g the Victors. Although the band;
s been augmented this year to
0 pieces, it has been decided to
t down its size to 58 pieces for
oadcasting purposes. During the
ogram popular Michigan footballf;
ngs will be broadcast, including
rsity, Men of the Maize and
ue, the Stadium March, the Yel-
w and the Blue, and the M Men
arch. The last named selection,
hich has been composed by Nic-
as D. Falcone , director of the
.nd, and has been dedicated to
obert A. Campbell, treasurer of
.e University and faculty man-.
er of the organization, will be
ayed for the first time tonight.
Shirley W: Smith, who as secre-
ry of the University, has been in
ose contact prospective student
r over. 30 years, will speak on the
iestion. "Can a student work his

Former Railroad Executive's Out-l
burst Arouses Governor in
Confab With Scribes
NOMINEE IN LOAFING MOOD

(By Associated Press)j
ALBANY, N. , Y., Oct. 3-Home.
again after a two weeks' campaign-
ing grind in the west, Gov. Smith
made the most of his opportunity
today to rest up for a renewal of
the presidential battle next week.
Refreshed by an eleven hour
sleep-the best night's rest he had
been able to get since leaving Al-
bany on his first stumping tour-
the Democratic nominee was not'
stirring around the executive man-
sion much before noon. He read-
ily conceded he was in a loafing
mood, .for the day at least, and
that about the only thing he had
in mind was a round of golf.
But before the governor started
out to one of the nearby country
Sclubs, ,he held..his customary daily
press conference with newspaper-
men who had requested the inter-
view despite his willingness tc
clamp the lid on news for a few
days and give all hands a rest.
Most of the discussion, which dealt
with campaign plans and strategy,
was "off the records," ain other
words not to be printed.
' During the "on the records" part
of the conference, however, Gov.
Smith, asked to comment on the
reported approval by D. F. Yoak-
um, former railroad executive, o:
"Hoover's farm. relief plan," re-
marked: "I can't for the life o:
me understand where Mr. Yoakun
can claim that Mr. Hoover has any
"He said in his speech of accept-
ance that the tariff was the foun-
' dation of farm relief," the Demo,
cratic nominee went on. "Every
student of the subject and ever:
farm leader takes a directly oppo'
site view. The whole contention
all along has been that the tariff
does not operate where the farme
(produces more than is consumec
It is the basis of the whole thing.'

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IEGENTS TO COMBINE
ERENCH AND SPANISH
ANGUAGE FACULTIES
HANGE TO MEET APPROVAL OF
THE FACULTY OF LIT-
ERARY COLLEGE
IMPROVEMENT PROMISED
Engineering and Literary School
Language Departments Will
Have One Head
Unqualified approval of the re-
ent decision of the Board of Re-
gents to incorporate the French
and Spanish departments of the
Literary and Engineering schools
into a single Romance Language
department is to be met with
among the faculty of the present
romance language department of
he College ofLiterature, Science.
and the Arts, it was indicated yes-
terday.
Expenses to Be Cut
Prof. Hugo P. Thieme, of the
French department, declared that
the change was both logical and
economical. In cutting down the
two existing departments into a
single one, he said, the amount of
overhead involved would be cut
just in half.
"At present," said Dr. Thieme,
there are courses being offered in
are totally different from those
given in the literary school. For
example, in the engineering school
certain courses in French and
Spanish literature are taught in
classes are taught in the native
French or Spanish. The union of
the two departments should result
in a beneficial revision of courses
May Change Instructors
"It will also be possible to le
instructors teach the coursesthe
can best," Dr. Thieme continued
"There are, perhaps at present cer-
tain instructors teaching beginnin
courses in the engineering schoo
who couldbetter instruct advance
classes. It will be possible .unde
the new regime to put such me
iri charge where their abilities ca
be utilized to best advantage."
Prof. Julio del Toro, of the Span-
ish department, pointed out the
possibilityeof improving the curric
ulum by selecting the best ourse
now offered in the two clleges
and expressed the opinion tha
greater unification could be attain
ed by reducing the number of de
partmental heads from two o
three to a single man.
RESCUE 27 FROM
SINKING VESSEL
(By Associate- -'c.'.s;'
NEW YORK, Oct. 3-Twenty
seven men were rescued from on
sinking ship today and efforts we
1 being made to save two score mor
{ on another distressed vessel.
I UNION REGISTRATION
1 Registration for Michigan
men at the Union is being
jcontinued each afternoon in
' the student offices on the
I third floor of the Union build-
, ing. A special registration
I period for students who have
classses from 8 to 5 each day
has been aranged again for
j this afternoon from 5 to 5:45
, o'clock.

Little Approves
Students'Attitude
Expressing his satisfaction of the
student attitude toward the pro-
posed Federal liquor investigation
on the campus, President Clarence
Cook Little yesterday issued a
statement concerning the action of
student bodies in regard to the
matter. The statement was issued
just before President Little left for
a trip to New York where he will
attend some meetings of educa-E
tional organizations, and was prob-
ably the last move that will be
made by the President's office for
the new few days in regard to the
situation.
The statement, reads:
I am pleased and encouraged
with the spirit of co-operation by
student organizations on the cam-~
pus. The Womens' league repre-
senting the women, and Adelphi,
the campus society for informal
discussion on controversial sub-
jects, both acted promptly and fa-
vorably. Delta Phi is the first of
the men's fraternities to take inde-
pendent action in support.
All these things show that the
students at Michigan are rallying
to the support of an impartial in-
vestigation calculated to provide
definite evidence in disproof of
loose and slanderous descriptions
of American University life.
DR. C. C. LITTLE .
PRICE OF ADISIO
IS ST FO "B"GAME

I - --- -- t

Two Contests Will Be Played
"B" Team While the "A"
Team Is Away

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By

I{

Speak

of. Fielding H. Yost, director
thletics, will divide his time on
program between this year's
:all prospects and the latest
tion to Michigan's athletic
ities, the new Intramural
ts building have ocupied his
rtion for the past-.two years,
he has again taken up his
hing duties this fall.
of. George G. Brown, of Chem-
engineering, who was recently
inted by the National Gasoline
iciation of America's Research,
artment to develop more and
er uses for natural gasoline,
speak on the problem of im-'
ring the quality of 'motor fuel.
he final talk of the evening will
iven by Prof. James K. Pollock,
hie political science department,
will speak on "The Cost of

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MAY USE FERRY FIELD
General admission to the two
"B" team games to be played at
Ann Arbor will be $1, it was an-
nounced yesterday afternoon by
Harry A. Tillotson, business mana-
ger of the Athletic association. Thef
tickets will be purchasable at the
field on the day of the game, as it
is not expected that there will bel
a large demand, the manager says.
The two "B" contests to be play-;
ed here will be on the days when1
the 'Varsity will be away .from
home. When the "A" team is
meeting Ohio State Oct. 20, the
seconds will play the Reserves from
that school, and when the fire
team is at Baltimore stacking up;
against the Navy, the Alma col-
lege eleven willcome to Ann Arbor.
Students will be admitted to ,
these games on the athletic pass j
books.
It has not yet been decided by
the Athletic association whether
the "B" games will be played on
Ferry field or at the new stadium.
STUDENT DIES OF
HEART TROUBLEk
Claude Hutchinson, '29, business
administration, died recently in
jthe University hospital of heart
trouble,rit was announced yester-
day. Hutchinson was taken ill
shortly after arriving in An Arbor
for registration this fall
The body has been sent for
burial to the home of his parents,
j Mr. and Mrs. William T. Hutchin-
son, at 513 Grove Street, Petoskey,
j Michigan.

JOUNCIL HEEDSPL.EA
O STAMP QOUT GRAFE
[EMBERS WILL ASSIST GROUPS
IN CHARGE OF DANCES
AND PROGRAMS
>L A N "P E P" MEETINGS
umors of Tickets Resales, Profit
Distribution, Commissions,
Bringing Action
Because there has been no defin-
te check on the financial manage-
nent of the various class party
ommittees in the past, the Stu-
lent Council last night passed a re-
ommendation which, if the Senate
committee on Student Affairs fin-
illy concurs, will provide a double
heck on the expenditures of all
uch committees. The recommen-
lation provides for a council mem-
er to sit on all committees as an
ex-officio member and keep a sepa-
ate set of records of the finances
of the committee.
All committee checks will have
to be countersigned by the council
nember, and no contracts can be
legally entered into without te
ignaturenofethe council member.
Rumors of resale by committeemen
)f tickets which had been handed
to the doorman, taking commis-
sions on contracts, and distribu-
tion of profits were said to have
brought about this action.
Committee Is Appointed
Paul J. Kern, '29, John Gilmartin,
'29E, and William E. Nssen, '29,
will constitute4 the committee of
the council which will draw up the
plan in detail, and present it to
the Senate Committee on Student
Affairs at its next meeting, where
it will have be to ratified before
going into effect.
The council agreed to reaffirm
its stand of last week, supportin
President Clarence Cook Little in
his drive to stamp .out the liquoi
evil on the campus.-
Pep Dates Recommended
Willard Lowry, '30, in charge o
pep meetings before footbal
games, recommended the Frida
nights before the Wisconsin anc
Illinois games as dates for meet
ings, his recorfmendations stand
ing approved.; Speakers for the
pep meeting will be selected fron
the following list submitted fron
Logansport, Ind., Robert'Hal
Chicago, Ray Sackett, Grand Rap
ids, Victor Pattengill, Lansing, for
mer football M-man, W. A. P. Jhn
Detroit, James K. Watkins, Detri
and John R. Watkins, U. S. distric
attorney, Detroit.
A report on the cheering section
given by Kern in the absence o
Richard Spindle, '29E, disclose
that the 1,137 seats provided i
this year's section had been sol
out, and that there had ben a:
overdemand fr cheering seto,
tickets. This marks the first tim
that the section has been comn
pletely sold.
CLUES INTENSIFY
HUNT FOR WOMAP
Finding the hat, coat, and sca
of Miss Mary Campbell on a
island in the Huron river, yeste
day intensified the search for th
Ann Arbor school teacher who h
been missing since she left h
home, 1131 Olivia avenue, about
o'clock Sunday afternoon. A ma:
whose identity was not disclose

found the garments Monday mor
ing but did not report to police u
til yesterday.
"Baffling," said her sister, Mir
Inez, when asked for a possib
solution of the mysterious disaf
pearance. Miss Campbell return
fron Detroit, where she teach
in the Liggett school, for a wee
end visit, and appeared in exce
lent health and good spirits. S
left her home shortly after no
Sunday, walked up Wells stre
toward Ferdon road where she w
last seen, and evidently took o
e of her customary walks along t
Huron river.
Monday and yesterday 150 B
Scouts were engaged in searchi
this section for the missing woma
DetectiveClifford West is wor
e ing on a suicide theory, althou
this is not substantiated by re
y tives who say that Miss Campb
l. never appeared mentally derang
e and was always active. She d
not carry a purse, this dispelli
it the rnhhj r'rv +hpnrv r Zvcict~r h

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Programs To Be Sold
At Game Saturday

POLITICAL SITUATION
DISCUSSED BY HOOVERi

>nfers With Coolidge At White
House On Progress Of
Presidential Fight

NEW YORK NOW DOUBTFUL

1

(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 3-Herbert

Hoover today paid. another visit to-
the White House to discuss the1
general political situation with
President Coolidge and disclosed
after the conference that the chief
executive planned to deliver some
addresses before election day.
The Republican presidentialI
nominee declared that he did not
know whether the speeches of Mr.I
Coolidge would be political. He
would not reveal the subject of
their conversation beyond declar-
ing that it was upon various mat-I
ters pertaining to the campaign
and the general progress of theI
presidential fight..
Earlier in the day Hoover wel-I
comed a group of first voters from
the town of Gov. Alfred E. Smith,,
his Democratic opponent, with a
brief address in which he empha-
sized that the vigor and ideals of
the younger generation were es-
sential to carry on the Republican
party.
The candidate also learned from
Representative Hamilton Fish of
New York, a new angle of the pa-
litical situation in that state. The I
nomination of Ambassador A. B.
Houghton of Great Britain as Re-
publican senatorial candidate, Fish'
declared, together with the vigor-
ous fight of the Democratic forces
under Gov. Smith, had thrown the
state into the doubtful column.
The selection of Houghton had
I eliminated the world war veterans
from the Republican party.
I Later Fish said he had informed.
Dr. Hubert Work, chairman of the
Republican national committee,
that unless the circulation of re-
ligious literature was stopped, the
Democrats would make sweeping
gains in the east. He .added that
he also had urged Work to sum-
mon Mrs. Mabel Walker Wille-{
brandt back to her duties in the
Department of Justice.1

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I SENIOR CLASS ELECTIONS
Tuesday
I Engineering college..11 a. m
I Architectural school. 4 p. m
I Dental school........4 p. m
I Law school..........5 p. m.

DATE SET FOR CLAS
ELECTIONS AT SECOII
MEETING Of COUNCI

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Close followers of the Wolverine
gridders who have been experienc-
ing difficulty in identifying the
players in the practice for the past
few weeks, will be able to gain
positive identification of all the
players at the Ohio Wesleyan game'
Saturday through the football pro-
.grams which are being published
by the Athletic association.
Because of the large number of
new gridders making a strong bid
for the Varsity eleven, the watch-
ers have found it hard to know the
name of a player that makes an
outstanding run, tackle or the like
during practice sessions and scrim-
mage.
Programs will be issued by the
Athletic association for all of the
six home games-Ohio Wesleyan,
Indiana, Wisconsin, Illinois, Mich-
igan State and Iowa.

Wednesday ,
Literary college ..... 4
Thursday
School of Education... 3
School of Bus. Ad... 4
College of Pharmacy. 5

Rooms will be
later.

NEW METHOD OF° SELECT]:
J-HOP CHAIRMANEALSO
APPROVED
TO CHECK CAMPUS VOTE
Class Lists to Be Used to Prev
Duplicating of Votes In
Campus Elections
Dates for class elections v
set at the regular .meeting of
StudentCouncil last night, a
method of electing the J-
chairman was voted upon fa
ably to go into effect, this fall,
a 'means of checking voters in
literary college elections was
tatively decided upon to pre
multiple voting and casting of v
by unauthorized persons.

Seircs eletin will bf
Tuesday, October 9;, and conti
through Thursday. On Tues
the. engineers willymeet at 11 a
in room 348 W. Eng., seniors in
College of Architecture and
Coliege of Dental Surgery will n
at 4, and senior law students a
The senior class of the liter
college will meet at 4 o'cock V
nesday for election of class offic
Date Undecided for Medical Sc
On Thursday at 3 o'clock
senior class of the School ofk
cation will meet, at 4 o'clock

*

!' The fall season of 1928 marks the
beginning of the fourth year of'
University broadcasting. Although,
f was formerly decided to broad-
cast this year through WGHP, the
change was made back to WJR-.
WCX because of the later's more
powerful jbroadcasting equipment
and consequently a greater range-
and a wider audience will be'
assured.
As was the case last year, each
of the programs will consist of
four five-minute speeches by mem-
bers of the faculty with five musi-
cal numbers alternated. This year
more attention will be given to
typically college music and it is
planned that the musical pro-
grams. be alternated between such
'organizations as the 'Varsity' band,
the Glee club, the Michigan Union
Opera chorus, and the Union dance
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UNIVERSITIES AID
DRAMATICS, EATO

seniors in business administration,
and at 5. o'clock the senior class of
the College of Pharmacy. Due to
laboratory schedules in the Medical
school, it has not been possible as
yet to arrange a date for their
elections.
Rooms in which elections will be
held. will be announced later
through the Daily.
Junior class elections will be held
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
of the following week, October 16-
18, following' the same daily' sched-
I ule for the different schools and
colleges. Sophomore elections will
be held the week following the
junior elections on corresponding
days and hours, and the freshman
class elections will be held some
time late in November.
Adopt New Methods
After discussion the council de-
'cided lash night that the chairman
I 'of the J-hop should be chosen on
a separate ballot. Heretofore the
chairman of the affair has been
the candidate for a place on the
committee who received the high-
est number of votes, provided he
was from the college whose turn it
I was to hold the chairmanship.
This year a separate ballot will be
taken on the chairmanship, with
defeated candidates holding the
option of running for places on the
committee. A system of letting the
committee elected choose its own
chairman was thrown out by the
. council.
To combat the politicalcorruption
' of former years a motion was in-
.troduced in the meeting to secure
lists of the members of classes from
the Recorder's office, and use them
to check off authorized voters as
they entered the voting room, at
* the same time handing each voter
a single ballot. Members of other
.classes than the one voting will
t thus be excluded, and a closer
t check will be possible on the. num-

"The hearty enthusiam of the
American stage of today comes not
from Broadway, but from the in-
terest of the amateur actors com-
pined with our university curri-
cula," stated Walter Pritchard
Eaton, eminent dramtic critic and
member of the Theater Guild, in
Natural Science auditorium yester-
day afternoon .
In quoting statistics Mr. Eaton
said that since Professor Baker's
first course in play writing, the
famous "Work Shop 47," 80 per
cent of the American plays have
been written by college graduates.
He said also that 50 per cent of the
scenery designing, directing and
producing has been done either
by Professor Baker's students or by
graduates of similar courses.
"This large percentage does not
hold true in acting because that
part of the drama requires more
actual practice than the Universit3
can afford time to give," the lectur-
er continued. "Euginene O'NeilI
and Paul Greene, author of "Or
Abram's Bosom" which will soon
appear in Ann Arbor, were both
graduates of Harvard. The enli-
veing of drama in North Carolina
alone came chiefly through the ex-
tensive state university training.'

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OFFICIALS PROBE
PLEDGE METHODS
(B socae1Pes

DEDICATION OF ANN ARBOR AIRPORT
TO INAUGURATEAIR MAIL SERVICE

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NGINEERS ELECT
HONOROFFICIALS'
The "Honor System," which has
mng been the goal of the Univer-
ity as a whole, has been an estab-
shed fact at the Engineering
dhool for some time. At a meet-
ag of the Freshman class yester-
ay, J. C. Widman, who is chair-
ian of the Honor Commission, ex-
lained the system and conducted

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Ann Arbor's new airport and
special air mail service to all main
points in the country as well as
many important points in the
state will be formally dedicated
Tuesday, Oct. 9, when many promi-
nent men in the city and state will
be present at a dedication lunch-
eon to be given at the air-port.
The new landing field is situ-
ated three and one-half miles west
of Ann Arbor, proceeding directly
out South State street. Mail
planes leave Ann Arbor twice daily,
first at 11:15 o'clock in the morn-
ing and then in the afternoon at
4:30 o'clock. Quick service will be
maintained with all cities to which
the service is extended. Mail leav-
ing ,Ann Arbor one day via the new
air service will be delivered in Chi-
cago, Cleveland, Iowa City, and a
number of other points within sim-

new service was cited yesterday by
O. O. McLeisch, general secretary
of the Ann Arbor chamber of com-
merce. McLeisch in order to test
the service dropped a letter in a
box in Kalamazoo, addressing the
letter to a local merchant. The let-
ter left his custody at 10 o'clock
one morning. That afternoon at
2:05 o'clock, the letter was received
by the merchant who replied im-
mediately by special delivery. The
merchant's letter was delivered to
the office of the chamber of com-
merce at 3:10 o'clock, so that the
entire correspondence through the
regular mail channels took only a
little more than five hours to be
completed.
Air mail can be dropped in any
box in the city, although special
boxes for additional convenience
- will be provided in the near future
-. accrdin o fnMffT.isr'h Thei;

ale
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(By Associated Press)
BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Oct. 3-
Methods of Greek letter fraterni-
ties in pledging Freshmen at How-
ard college here were being inves
tigated today? by President John C.
Dawson on a complaint of A. D.
Jeffery of Andalusia, Ala., that he
had been drugged Monday night
in the annual fraternity pledge
drive. Dr. Dawson said the inves-
tigation would not be dropped un-
til the responsible persons are
brought before the college author-
ities.
Jeffery said he was pledged to
the Pi' Kappa Alpha fraternity at
the annual fraternity banquet but
today he gave back his pin. He
said two men whom he could no
identify.approached him on a
downtown corner Monday nigh
and discussed fraternities witl
him. After having a soft drini
with they men, the student told Dr.
Dawson he became dizzy and was
told by hiss companions to sit down
in an automobile parked at the

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ber of votes cast by each perso:
UNION WILL GET
SERIES RETURI
Play by play. results of e
World series game will be
nounced in the Union tap roor
a radio set installed there for

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