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January 12, 1929 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1929-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i'OATLIRMM Ti\NU)Ar%'121 121,

FLO PLANS THIRD TRYi Modern Composition
Subject Of Lecture
AIP-UT By English Musician

A lette
newspap
last Nov

FRENCHMAN, VISITING HERE, ADMIRES ATHLETIC PLANT AND WOMEN
r published in the French the American sees only the indis- tions. and the American student, of flowers all these assembled girls
pensable. Everything is so dis- a veritable athlete, who passes five made. The mysterious perfume, a
er, Echo of Paris, of posed that students and teachers hours a day in the stadium with thousand aromas of the new Amer-
ember 13 containing im- do not have to let things of the his body half bared. Note well, ica, filled the atmosphere around
s of the University of mind keep them from the exercises however, that all this costs him them."
n as related by Henri De and the sports so necessary to the relatively much less than our stu- --

"Standards in mu;ic, as in anyM Mic hn

S11, U aay l p oroug'nK li a
knowledge of the masterpieces of1 Kerillis has been translated into
the past, and moderm musicians: English by Wilfred B. Shaw and
cannot be judged apar4 from their published in the Michigan Alumnus.
predecessors," declared TErnest Mr. Kerillis, a' Parisian travelingy
Fowles of the Royal. Academy of; through the United states, was
Music, London, in his lecture trac- studying the form and direction of
ing the rise and tendencies of, various fields of activity especiallyt
modern music yesterday, afternoon political, religious, and moral.
in Hill auditorium. While in AnnuArbor he was the
Four permanent standards of guest principally of Prof. James K.
Appreciation were given, by the Pollock of the Political Science de-

1
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fr
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body: immense bathing pools, in-
door tennis courts under spacious.
well-aired, well-lighted conditions
of which we have no idea at home;
golf links, football fields, arenas for
competition, gymnasiums, places
sumptously arranged for a hundred;
different games of which I don't
even know the names.
What a contrast to the misery of
our universities, and also what a'
contrast between the student of our'
great Paris, often worn by priva-

dent pays.
In concluding his letter, Mr.'
Kerillis refers humorously to his,
visit to one of the main girls' dor-
mitories where he and Professor
Pollock were the only men, "In
the midst of three or four hundred
ravishing girls casting their glances
upon ue, their solitary visitors, I
found myself a little out of my
element."
Mr. Kerillis goes on to say of the
girls, "What a ravishing parterre

I Detroit TheatersI

SHUBERT
LAFAYETTE
Pauline Frederick
(Herself)
"THE SCARLET WOMAN"
Nights 50c to $2.50; Thursday
and Saturday Mats, 50c to $1.50

i
i
-
.$
s
t
s

at the
Armory
Every
Wednesday and
Saturday Nites
ParkPlan
Everybody.
Welcome

partment whose acquaintance he
had made when Professor Pollock
was in Paris on a similar trip to
study the French political cam-
paigns and elections.
Mr. Kerillis, in his letter, ex-
plains much of the history of the
University, its size, its work, and
the town of An Arbor itself which
he considers very similar to Eu-
ropestn towns in "its provincial
charms with its houses hidden in
theiri green gardens."
Speaking of the University he
says, "I visited the gathering places
of tlhe University at some length,
as well as the innumerable and
sumptuous student and faculty
clubs. What comfort! what luxury!
is all that can be said by a French-
man .for whom luxury begins where

--------------

4

._.

J n i.f J2 --

Some Men Feared Her, J1
But All Men Loved Her!
LAST TIMES TODAY
She scorned all men! The crack
of her whip shrieked a war note
Presented that all men understood-but one
by man heard it echo a song of love.
ROBERT Here is a symphony of emotions
KANE blended into a dramatic master--
Story by piece by three great stars!
Forrest
Halsey
and Leland
Hayward

PLEASE
This a
ited to f
Ann Art

fop.
NOTE-
ttraction is lim-
'our days only in
bor.
/
loop

,
I
i

The Art of the Films0

Cosmopolitan OpeningToday
Presentation unusual of Frederick O'Brien's
flaming love story of the tropics that astounded
the world, the picturization of which has never
before been attempted on the screen.
dhe Unearthly deautY
Tahii-Striling!.
ar lvahing iferent!
edcie W nefl

'Areap.

witho LSh
Estelle Taylor - Antonio Moreno -- Lowedl Sherman

ICHILN

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IV
rA
r P
r 4 1

d

, ,

*1 r
_y
Iowl
) 3
jR
* .A
-, ~ -..

-A

TODAY

Another Big Anniversary
Show
%" : V with
EL.
BRENDEL
and .0r
FLO BERT
in
¬ęBeau Night"
EDITH BURR
DAVIS and DAWN
in
"REVUE UNUSUAL"
with
GLORIA LEE
and
k HORMAN BROTHERS
ANGEL BROS.
"Unrivaled Balancers"
Inventors of The Ladder Stand
and
The Only Athletes Performing It
-On the Screen
"ANNAPOLIS"
A tensely drAmatic appealing story
of two American middies and a girl,
.., lwthtan atithin..m nip.-s

.,:
ry
fA.
F

X; t

.

*. .JJ

S I

35c
10c
'7:00
8:40
10c

CO-STARRING

%V4

'y1
I'.,. k *
I 3 44
4' t 4
t'.1
S4h.
I
' .1
'~( ;Y

7 s 1
k /

MAJESTIC
COMBINATION
ENSEMBLE
KEN OSBORNE
Novelty Organist

RAQUE L
TORRES
(as the native maid)
AND ALL-STAR CAST
MUSICAL SYNOPSIS BY
SPECIAL ARRANGOEMENT
WITH COSMOPOLITAN
PRESENTATIONS

MONTY
BLUE
(as the white lover)

Majestic Appointments
ALL STARS in

1'I

Come-Forget winter! Get away frjom
Ann Arbor! Come listen to strange love
calls 'neath the sighing palms!
Here is romance woven from the
threads of primitive love; a maiden too
nure for the eves of man. bride of the

I

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