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October 03, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.. .

IET.NE WILL BE
VIDED AT WUERlTH

rr

Sound and Talking Productions
Will Be Ready Within
Three Months
ENGINEERS MAKE CHICI E
According to an announcement
made yesterday by Richard Wat-
son, manager of the Wuerth thea-
tre, sound equipment which will
provide facilities for the produc-
tion of sound and talking photo-
plays will be installed within the
next three months.
Mr. Watson stated that the fea-
ture productions are made in two
types, the talking picture and the
synchronized picture. The first
type uses characters that the audi-
ence can hear speaking or singing,
the vocal effects being an actual
part of the drama, playlet, or
sketch projected on the screen.
The synchronized type of sound
picture uses musical effects merelyI
as a background though purely
mechanical sounds as the roar of
airplanes, knocks, cheers of crowds,
laughter and similar effects are
included in this class and add
greatly to the realism of the pro-
duction.

NEW ACTIVITY IN St
H OLDS PROSPEC
An increased interest in all its
departments and activities is being
experienced by the School of
Music this year, according to Char-
les A. Sink, director of the insti-
tution. Besides a great demand for
tickets to its concerts and a keen
r competition for membership in its
musical organizations, the School
has had a considerable increase in
enrolement, so that members of
the administration and faculty are
having some difficulty in meeting
demands and organizing material.
The greatest increase in interest
is shown in the series of Choral
Union ,concerts, the demand for
tickets being largerthan that of
any previous season. The unusual
attention given to this phase of
the Music School's work is ex-
plained by the unprecedented ar-
ray of celebritiesi on this year's,
series, which includes such illus-
trious names as Rosa Ponsella,
Galli-Curci, Fritz Kreisler, Detroit
Symphony Orchestra, Flonzaley
Quartet, and others of like fame.
In view of the greater demand
for tickets to the concert series, a
proportionately increased interest
in the May Festival is expected.
Additional singers are therefore
being welcomed to the membership
role of the Choral Union, although
tryouts are now coming to a close.'
Whether the series of weekly.
twilight hour organ recitals will
be welcomed with as much enthu-
siasm as other musical programs
will be shown. this afternoon when
Palmer Christian, University or-n
ganist, opens the series in Hill
Auditorium at 4:15. The new or-;

C7HOOL OF MUSIC Demand For Tickets-
T FOR FIN E SE]ASON Exceeds Estimates

gan, which embodies all improve-
ments brought about by modern
developments in organ building,
will be heard for the first time by
most students, having been heard
only by those .who were present at
its dedication during the May Fes-
tival last spring.
YOST WILL SPEAK
A T GRID BANQUE T
Fielding H. Yost, Director of Ath-
letics, is to be the principal
speaker at the Annual Football
Bust Banquet at Owasso, Michigan
on Nov. 27. This is the fourth
annual celebration of the affair at
( which timre, athletic letters are
awarded toethe Owasso highrschool
lettermen and a program featuring
athletics is presented.
Harry Kipke, former Michigan
athlete and coach, and at present
head Football coach at Michigan
State College, was the speaker at
the first banquet four years ago.
Jack Blott, another Michigan ath-
lete and coach, and Coach Tad
Wieman have been the other
speakers at the affair since then.
IOWA-More than 350 people
attended the opening reception at
the university theatre. The recep-
tion was held to create interest in
a series of plays to be produced
throughout the winter by play pro-
duction classes. A large number of
season tickets have already been
sold.

DIXON ST RESSES NE ED OF SOUNDER
SO LUT IONS T O FOR EST RY PROBL EMS

Increasing rapidly in the past
few days, the ticket demand for the
Michigan-Indiana game has be-
come quite formidable, it was stat-
ed late yesterday afternoon by
Harry A. Tillotson, business man-
ager of the Athletic association. It
is yet to early to get any estimate
of the attendance for that game,
but it will be larger than early
expectations.
The Indiana game comes earlier
in the season than the Wolverines
have been in a habit of meeting,
conference schools.'Usually Michi-
gan State is played before the
Maize and Blue take on Big Ten
comipetition, but this year the
State contest is nearthe bottom
of the schedule.
Invitations totaling 50,000 in
number has sent out to high school
students of the state, for the Ohio
Wesleyan game, taking place Sat-
urday, as the season's opener.
Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois are
quite certain to be sellout games,
according to Mr. Tillotson. For the
Ohio State game the Michigan al-
lottment is going fast. Tickets in
general are in greater demand than
was expected before football prac-
tice was started.

Contemplating the inscription
by Agassiz on the front of the new
Museum building, 'Go to nature,
take the facts in your own hands,
and see for yourself,' Joseph S. Dix-
on, assistant curator at the Uni-
versity of California, said in an in-
terview yesterday, "Yes, and to
that I would add, 'and apply the
fact to your problems'." M~r. Dix-
on was referring to the great need
of observing nature to apply the
knowledge to the problems of for-
estry and conservation.
Mr. Dixonis in heartycaccord
with the policy of the local For-
estry school of studying the forests
in order that they may be utilized
to~ their greatest extent, as re-
gards recreation, wild life, graz-
ing, and timber. He believes that
the aspects of woods life are all
inter-related. It is not only the
duty of the scientist to research
for the * information, but also to
provide for parctical application of
what he has learned.
In speaking of the present move-
ments toward conservation, he
continued, "The trouble with con-
servation today is that it is too
unconservative. At present it is
nothing but a lot of propaganda
warning us to slow up on what we

Society To Spot
S peech On P'1

are consuming. However, to me
conservation is the complete utili-
zation of all phases of our forest
life. Conservation must be put on
a firmer basis."

"Some Amenities of Platinum"
is the subject of a lecture to be
given at 4 o'clock Thursday, Octo-
ber 4, in the Chemistry amphithe-

"Michigan has a problem," he atre by Dr. James Lewis r Howe,
concluded, "just as we have in professor of chemistry at Washing-
California. Michigan has a great ton and Lee university.
deal of waste forest land and a The lecture is the first of a
very large population." That con- series to be given by the Univer-
stitutes the problems which the sity of Michigan section of the
local school is working on. American Chemical society.
i i 11 ii 11i11 0ll I tglli tt1 11111 1iu 1i lllllffflliinginglit illl ittflilllll,;
FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
GIVE US A TRIAL ON ALL
YOUR PRINTING NEEDS
'Printing Th'1at Pleases
C]~ &j~fiesby
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711 N. Univ Ave. Phone 8805 (Over Geo. -Moe's) a-
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It is interesting to note that
since the advent of the motion pic-
ture it has become in the 25 years
of its existence one of the four
largest industries in the Uniteca
.States.Now within the perfection
of sound-and-sight machines it is
hard to predict what the rise of
this industry will be. Certain it
is, however, that small towns hith-
erto inaccessible to road shows will
now be able to witness Broadway
productions far more, easily.
In concluding .his announcement
Mr. Watson stated that of all the
theatres in Ann Arbor, the Wuerth
appeared by the engineering sur-
veys to .be the best in size, arrange-
ment and accoustics for the idea:
presentation of sound pictures.

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Books, Paper, and Fcsuritan Pens, l ngineers' and Architects'
Maetrials, Pennants andr Jewelry

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CHOCOLATES
Salways fresh
STHIS STORE IS JOHNSTON HEADQUARTERS E
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BETTSY ROSS SHOP
15 Nickels Arcade
11i 1ga uluulnnniu nu nn liiin iiin

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1111 South University

%, Block from Campus

ONE CENT SALE OF REXALL
MERCHANDI SE
October 17, 18, 19, 20
Four Days of Bargains in Stationery, Rexall Remedies, Rubber
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Y'ou pay the regular price for one article and get- another for
only One 'Cent.

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CALL 4101 AND ORDER
YOUR SHERBETS, AND
YOUR PUNCH AS WELL!
The Ann Arbor Dairy specializes in making delicious
rbets and fruit punches.
ou'll like the way the ANN ARBOR
Arbor Dairy makes DAIRY
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made up in molds for spe-
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ANN ARBOR DAIRY CO.
T he H o.m e o f P u re M il
DIAL 4101

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UNITED CAB

Call 7047

ORDER RATES

Onei passenger....
Two or more.. .. .

35c
. . 60c

Edsell's Rexall Drug
208 s. Man st.

Store

Next to Kresge's

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Choice Cuts of Beef, Pork, and Veal
HOME DRESSED CHICKENS
FISH and OYSTERS

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Gfell's Market
223 N. Main

16 E.LIBERTY ST

702 SO.STATE ST.

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CORNWELL COAL - COKE

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Scranton, Pocahontas
Kentucky and West Virginia Coa
Solvay and Gas Coke

REMOVING THE SPOTS
Clothing accumulates spots no matter how careful
we are. But why worry. We can remove them in
our dry cleaning establishment and make them as
fresh and as good looking as ever. To keep them
looking new let us call for clothes regularly so that
you will always have a clean and well pressed suit
oi' dress on hand all the time.
Buy a Cash Card and Save Money

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This business has been growing ever
since it was established. The secret-
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business in a friendly way. If you
think so toolet's get together.

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Men's Suits or Top Coats
Cleaned and Pressed, 95c

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