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December 11, 1928 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'AGE TWO
CELTIC RUNS ACBOUND
OFF IRELAND; REPORT
PASSENGERS RESCUE

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

TUESDAY, DECEMf3ER 11, 1928

SCREEN

SHOW DRAWINGS
OF CONSTRUCTION

REFLECTIONS

On view at the Michigan is Reg-
inald Denny's latest picture,, "The
Night Bird," somewhat modeled

HARD
DANG
unable
Hol
A

COB
White
todayI
entran
in only
today.
it was
get off
break u
All o
gers w(
safely
water
A Briti
the wo
passenE
harbor
gers nu
Talki
the A
Johnsti
Roches
scriptio
"It v
see the
on the
by a
Johnso
of the
"She
lying o
Roches
west a:
there i
of her
S
"The
and fol
tide re
more tl
her hu
the lin
thereN
disaste:
badlyc
be *en
I am a
jettison
ship a
this ca
"Fine
saving
comes
aggerat
come a
on the
Thre
passeng
left Ne
tering.
about 6
hap oce
The t
hit the
the lig
The ve
steady.

after the experiences of our recent-
AND FAST ON ROCKS ly retired Shakesperian heavy-
SAYS LIGHTHOUSE Iweight champion, Mr. Eugene Tun-
KEEPER ney. Denny does resemble him
somewhat and makes an interest-
ER OF BREAKING UP ing film that starts off rather slowt
_but finishes up at the final "finis"a
To Take Pilot On Board; with a fast ring battle.
le Stove In Engine Room Denny has literally "fought his
nd Ship Taking Water way up" to stardom through count-c
--less pugilistic pictures starting off1
8 Asocwi:1 Pirrs with that famous series of two-
H, Ireland, Dec. 10.-The reelers, "The Leather Pushers." No
Star liner Celtic, which early' one has ever heard to complainf
ran aground at the harbor that Reginald, despite his name,
ce, was perched on flat rocks f&lls to look the part. for he's got
15 feet of water at low tide the muscular development to de-f
She was taking water and light both Bernarr McFadden andI
feared that if she did not "Doc" May.-
on the next tide she might Betsy Lee, a comparative new-E
ap. coiner, plays opposite the star ins
f the 500 or more passen- 'T'h e Night Bird.'' Her
ere rescued, being debarked performance as a mistreated
in tenders oespite rough Italian waif before whose sim-
around the stranded liner. ple charms the champ falls hard,3
sh destroyer co-operated in is .rather good. Sam Hardy in the
rk and aided in bringing the role of the prize-fighter's managerl
gers to safety through the provides a share of the picture'sX
to the docks. The passen- laughs, although "The Night Bird"
imbered 253. is hardly as amusing as some of
ng over the telephone to Denny's former films.
Michael Reginald is the gent, incidentally,I
associated Press, Miheelwho is a great aviation enthusiast.
on, lighthouse keeper at
Point, gave a graphic de- He spent so much time in the air,<
n of the disaster. in fact, that Mrs. Denny gave himI
the air not so long ago.
was a melancholy sight to 'The hour's vaudeville show is ex-I
great liner hard and fast cellent with a number of different
rocks as if she were held acts of the heralded "All-College"
hundred anchors, declared unit providing an unusually good(
n, who knows every inch | treat for Mr. Butterfield's patrons.
rugged-coastline. If you haven't already seen it, bet-I
is entirely on the rocks, ter do so by Wednesday night. I
n a flat spur 300 yards-from At The Wuerth
point. Her head is due |'Sunrise," the long-awaited F.
nd she is so firmly wedged W. Murnau epic, is showing at the
s hardly a trace of motion Wuerth all week. You ought to
hull. find it a pleasing diversion fromE
Struck At High Water the usual stereotyped film, for
liner struck at high water Murnau brings a new type of mo-
ur hours afterward, with the tionpicture technique to the fore-
ceding, there was hardly front here.
han 15 feet of water around George O'Brien, without his sail-
ll. Only for the fact that or pants, and Janet Gaynor are the
er was going at slow speed !stars of "Sunrise." Both give amaz-
would 'have been a terrible ing performances, strikingly dif-
r. Despite this she has been ferent from anything they have
damaged and it remains to ever done before, while Margaret
whether she can be floated. Livingston is seen as the voluptuous
fraid it will be necessary to siren.
a her cargo to lighten the Whether you like trick camera
s much as possible before angles or not, "Sunrise" is a dis-
n be achieved. tinct departure in cinema produc-
weather is essential to the tion and warrants your presence
of the Celtic. If the sea be- downtown sometime this week.
bad I don't thihk it any ex- B. J. A.
ion to say that she will be-
total wreck. It all depends
weather."
e tugs aideck in removing
ers from the vessel, which
w York Dec. 1 and was en-
the harbor to disembark
0 passengers when the mis-
urred.
ide was high when the liner
rocks almost right under
hthouse at Roches point.
ssel remained upright and

RACKS MODERN YOUTH,
Speaks Before Large Audience At
Second Convocation
Sunday
URGES UNDERSTANDING
Flaying the weaklings who decry
the present and look to the past
and the future for improvement,
the Reverend John Timothy Stone
defended modern youth before a
large student convocation in Hill
auditorium Sunday, and preached
a modern gospel of sympathy, con-
fidence, understanding, and love.
"We need to be sympathetic in-
stead of cynical," Stone said, "con-
fident instead of critical, controlled,
by love instead of compelled by
law, instructed instead of restrict-
ed of dictation, understanding in-
stead of argument, and Christ in-j
stead of creed."
Taking an informal text from
Theodore Roosevelt, "Do the .best
you can with what you've got
where you are," Stone deplored the
prevalent tendency to compare the
present collegiate type with that
of fifty years ago and find him
mentally and spiritually inferior.
It is ohly the weaklings who look
back to the "good old days" or
ahead to a "marvelous future" and
destroy the achievements and no-
bility of the present day.
"This is a day of wonderful op-
portunity," he said. We- should be
satisfied with it. It is only the
poor fisherman who always wants to
change his stream, the weak man
who is always anxious to change
his job. It is-only t;e weakling
who wants something else than the
opportunity of the present and
turns historian \or prophet.
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY: The'
establishment of a ground school in
aviation at Ohio State will be rec-
ommended to the Ohio legislature,
by the committee appointed by that
body.
Pianos, Radios,
Victrolas
and Everything Musical
Make Your House a Home
This Christmas
Pay next year.
Schaeberle & Son
Music House
110 S. Main St.

Drawings, sketches, and actual
photographs of examples of the
latest styles in concrete construc-
tion are on exhibition in the show
cases in the lobby of the new Arch-
itectural building.
These crawni~gs and pictures'
have been collected by Dr. Francis
S. Onderdonk, of the College of
Architecture in preparation for a
book which he is writing concern-
ing the practicability of this new,
type of construction. Most of the
buildings already built from poured
concrete are to be foupd in Ger-
many where it has proved practical
and Dr. Onderdonk believes that
more of it should be done especially
in America where at the present
time concrete is seldom used ex-
cept for foundations, sidewalks,
and occasional supporting columns.
BRITISH COLUMBIA: A new
technical school opened in Van-
couver recently, equipped with
every modern device.

Pawlowski To Read
Paper At Convention
Prof. Felix W. Pawlowski, of the
department of aeronautical engin-
eering, left Ann Arbor late yester-
day for Washington, D. C. to attend
a conference called by PresidemL
Coolidge in commemoration of the
twenty-fifth anniversary of the
first sustained, controlled human
flight made by man in heavier
than air machine.
Professor Pawlowski has been
asked to read a paper on aeronau-
tical research to the convention.
Only a few men throughout the
country were selected to thus de-
liver papers to the delegates, who
will represent more than 50 foreign
nations.
Other members of the depar -
mental staff in aeronautical engin-
eering will take charge of Profes-
sor Pawlowski's classes while he is
away, it was announced yesterday.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
$4.00 a year.

Continued from Page One)
a guarantee of success. We have
had several Ph.D.'s who were flatt
failures, and it is doubtful whether1
they ever would be successful, even .
though they lived a hundred years,-
he continued.
"The discouraging feature aboutr
our younger men and some of the1
older ones is that they are not wil-.
ling to make the sacrifice necessary
to success-and that is hard work.
They are not satisfied with part
time work: they want instructor-1
ships while teaching; they want
increases continually before theyl
have served their apprenticeship:
they marry while they are in the,
period of apprenticeship and then I

PROFESSOR THIEME DOUBTS VALUE
OF NATION'S ARTICLE ON TEACHING

want professorships; and finally
when they do get their doctorate
they feel the University owes theta
promotion immediately, but forget
that that is merely the beginning.
"Such an article as was publish-
ed only encourages the mediocre.
The young man who has the right
kind of spirit, the determination
to succeed by dint of hard work
and sacrifice has just as fine an op-
portunity to succeed in our profes-
sion as the young man who enters
business. Our advantages far ex-
ceed those of other professions,
provided a man loves this profes-
sion and is willing to share its
hardships with its pleasures," Pro-
fessor Thieme concluded.

r - f - .

any
om
ist-
hat \
or
by
e1ry

,;

a
t

i
t
i
', {
i ' _ l jt
li }
1
!.

Crew Stays Aboard
There was no fog at the time of
the mishap. The Celtic was within
a short distance of where ships
usually cast anchor to meet ten-
ders which come from Queenstown
to land mail and passengers.
The Celtic stove a hole directly
under her engine room. The mis-
hap was due to the pilot being un-
able to go aboard owing to a gale.
Detroit Theaters
CASS THEATRE
BEGINNING MONDAY, DEC. 10
Nights $1.00 to $2.50
HAL SKELLY
AND BARBARA STANWYCK
In the Comedy Success Entitled
"BURLESQUE"
SHUBERT 7
' LAFAYETTE
WM. HODGE
In His Greatest Success
"STRAIGHT THRU THE DOOR"
Nights 50c to $2.50; Thursday
and Saturday Mats. 50c to $1.50

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