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December 09, 1928 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'-UN DAY, DE'GEMBErv 9, 1928

TH..........AN.DAI.

SUNDAY, DECEMBEfl 9. 192~

COPY(| OF\ BRONZE BT Nephew of Taft Chosen
COY or BH LL ,U \German Club President

DISREGARDING ROUGHNESS OF OUR COEDS, DE KERILLIS
PICTURES ANN ARBOR AS EDEN SURROUNDED BY CHAOS

I IU U R MIl i i Despite "rough" coeds, the Uni-
l ium versity and the whole town of Ann
Arbor is one of the most charming
A reproduction of the bronze places in the United States, in the
bust of the late Howard Van Doren o d
Shaw, noted Chicago architet, opinion of Henride Kerillis, of then
which is now in the Chicago Art Echo de Paris. Kerills recently
Institute, has just been presented visited the University on a tour of
to the College of Architecture by the United States.
the sculptoress, Sylvia Shaw Jud- "Here, America is less far from
son, a daughter of the architect, it ere Aeria i s far sro
Europe," he writes in his news-
was announced yesterday by Dean paper. "First of all, because Ann
Emil Lorch, of the architectural A bor differs in type from most
school. American cities. These houses of
Mr. Shaw, until recently, was one .Ann Arbor, hidden in the verdure,
of the most outstanding architects of their gardens, have almost the
in the Middle West and his work charm of provincial France. About
was considered as exemplary of fhe the vast austere buildings of the
best type of designing produced by University, they cast a sweet and
that section of the country. Two soothing harmony and reveal an
years ago he was voted the gold. America that is calm, composed,
medal of honor of the American
Socity o Arhitets.and meditative.
Society of Architects.t.r "What a relief from those hor-
The origin'al bust which is now
in the Chicago Art Institute was Walbridge S. Taft rible cities, built like checker
done during the life time of the Nephew of William H. Taft, boards, that one sees rising out of
famous architect by his daughter chief justice of the supreme court, nothing along the rail road tracks.
who <has studied in Chicago and who is a Berlin, Germany, lawyer, And what a relief from the gigan-
Paris. It has been recognized by has been elected president of the tic, crushing, cubistic structures
many authorities as one of the Americmn club of that city, suc- that give an atmosphere so titan-
finest pieces of sculpture of its ceeding the late Lincoln Eyre. tic and vaguely Babylonian to
kind in the Institute and the Col- cities such as New York and Chi-
lege of Architecture is especially D ccinson Will Talk ago.
fortunate to receive the reproduc- "Ann Arbor salso represents an-
tion which, though not of brass, is On Socialism Today other type of American, one who 's
done in a brass finish similar to the - -not a banker, business man, money
original, according to Prof. Lorch. "Are We Approaching Social- maker, or a cowboy, of that inde-
-- - -- ism?" will be the subject of a talk scribable group that rises in the!
Professors To Talk by Prof. Z. Clark Dickinson, of the cities, or from the brutal condi-
economics department, at 2:46 tions of the wilderness. Here one
At Speech Convention o'clock this afternoon, in room 204 finds an American who is here be-
S. W., before the Round Table cause of a taste for study, and who
Four members of the speech de- club. shows a refinement, a gentle and
partment will take an active part Professor Dickinson, who is a amiable manner, and sense of deli-
at the convention of the National well known authority and author cacy, that makes him one of the
Association of Teachers of Speech on the subject of economics, will most charming of beings.
to be held from Dec. 26-29 in Chi- base his speech on the statement "I made an extensive visit to the
cago, it was announced yesterday. of Herbert Hoover, who, during the University buildings and the in-
Prof. James M. O'Neill,- head of recent presidential campaign, said numerable and luxurious clubs for
the speech department, will con- that "the public ownership and students and professors. 'What
duct a round table at the conven- control of utilities and railroads as comfort' and 'what luxury' is all
tion on "Problems in tfe building they new exist is tending toward that a Frenchman can say. Lux-
of a department"'; Prof. Gail E. state socialism." In analyzing thc uries are becoming almost neces-
Densmore, who is also manager of question, Professor Dickinson will sities to. Americans. Everything is'
the Michigan High School Debat- coiwider both sides of the question. I provided that the student and

professor couldc possily need for student, a real athlete, who pass _
the exercising of spirits and bodies. five hours a day half nude on tli
Immense swimming pools, covered sporting field."
tennis courts with such conditions Telling of a dinner part at one
of ventilation and lighting as we of the girls' dormitories in Aan Ar-
do not dream of in France. There bor to which he was invited, the
are golf links, football fields, wrest- Frenchma'n describes Amerie ia
ling rooms, gymnasiums, and other women students to be a little rouh
quarters for a hundred diffferent in manner but quite beautiful.
kinds of sport." "What a ravishing flower-bed
IKerillis was also impressed by they made, all these girls assem-
University students. "What a con- bled," he comments. "Around
trast is there," he writes, "between them the air was filled with a
the French student, pallid from life mysterious perfume compounded
in immense Paris, often weakened of the thousand scents of New
by privations, and the American America.'
Lafayette Cadillac
at Shelby 8705
LAFA*'YrETTE
THEATRE
WM.H
In His Greatest Success
"STRAIGHT THRU THE DOOR"
Endorsed by
NEW YORK, CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA, BOSTON
New York Times-"Abounds in sentiment and satire."
New York Graphic-"Deliciously entertaining."
Chicago American-"Proves bull's-eye."
Philadelphia Ledger-"Audience delighted."
Boston Advertiser-"Star never more effective.
Nights 50c to $2.50; Thursday and Saturday Mats. 50c to $1.50
Two Weeks Only
Commencing Sunday Eve., Dec. 9th

C"'h-ristmas Music
YPSILANTI NORMAL CHOIR
FR EDERICK ALEXANDER, Conductor

200 Mixed Voices

150 Children's Voices

Noels from Provence, Medieval Germany and Old England;
Nativity Mtusic from Italy, Austria, Russia, France; early English
Choral Dances; Madrigals; Ballets.
Pease Auditorium, Ypsilanti, Wed., Dec. 12
8 p. m. sharp
50 cents to any seat. No reserved seats.
- ltllB~tiitliittllllllillltllt tltl1lllltltilflil 1tit. llillifllllllt llililtltil l ttll l tltn
I HErm-"ATREK
Lafayette at Wayne Cadillac 1100
BEGINNING MONDAY, DEC. 10
AT 8:30
Nights $1.00 to $2.50
Wednesday
Pop. Mats. and Satuiday 75c to $1.50 l
Direct from One Year's Triumphant Run
at the Plymouth Theater, New York
ARTHUR HOPKINS Presents
HAL SKELLY
in His Original Creation of "Skid"
-AND-
BA RBA RA ST ANWYCK
Sin Her Original Role of "Bonny"
In the Comedy Success Entitled
"BURLESQUE"
A Romance of Stage Folks and Stage Life Behind the Scenes
tttlllttltltitllltldklltll11ltltt~ ttU ltl! lllllillllllN l1111~~t1''

Joy Month Means Early Shopping, A Good Deed to the Salesgirls, and Joyous Entertainment! I

Pick out your choice of the splendid shows listed below, then plan to attend with the whole family.
we wish to call your especial attention to the marvelous program at the Michigan. Because of the si
the show will be unusually long and below, for your convenience, is printed the time schedule for SL

And
x acts,
unday.

~.!

MATINEES
Doors Open at 1 p. m. First Show 1:15. Picture 1:15,
Vaudeville 2:15; Picture 9:15, Vaudeville 4:15; Pic-
ture 5:15.

d
x

NIGHTS
Doors open at 6:10. First
Show 6:40; Second Show 8:45.

x
p'l 'f'

,.. .1tS - Y. ,. ..,.: .. ,.: ..,

w

" ,-%I t"irhoe1tu a rI~

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