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December 08, 1928 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1928

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SOVIET DIVORCE LAWS
TOUTOO BARRIST ER&
BY WORLD _LR
DIVORCE IS MORE C05ON
THAN IN THIS COUNTRY,
LAWYERS TOLD
SPEAKER IS AN ALUMNUS
Talk Is Based On 10,000 Mile Trip
Made Rceently Through
Land Of Soviet

ITALIA HERO IS ENROUTE TO ROME INVESTIGATION BOLOS
TO TESTIFY CONCERNING DISASTER

"Russian divorce is so simple,
quick, and almost humorously com-
mnn that it makes our own Nevada
courts look quite medieval-daring
as they are to us," declared R.
Mackley Butler, '87L, world traveler,
in a recent talk before the Barris-
ters. He described the soviet Com-
munistic institutions noted during
a recent 10,000 mile trip through
Russia.
"Marriage has become a simple
proceedure in Russia where the
couple are made one by the simple
- signing of a contract, witnessed by
a commissioner. But surprisingly,
divorce has become far more sim-
ple. The divorce commissioner had
just finished telling us that last
year. there were two divorces for
every three marriages in Russia,
when a wild-haired young giant
strode into the office and demand-
ed an immediate divorce. More-
over, 'he secured it without any de-
lay-in fact, without any notice to
the other party or even a pretense
of a hearing. Questions were asked
as a matter of form, but not as to
why the divorce was wanted. That
is presumably a domestic secret.
The divorce issues as a matter of
form to any one applying, whether
nin or wife. in short, the only
requisite is that there be a marri-
age to dissolve," Mr. Butler con-
tinued.
"The commissioner mails a post-
card to the divorced wife to let her
know she is single again and may
resume her maiden name. She
may present to him any claims she
may have kor support, but that is
all. It is so simple and quick that
no Russian can tell whether he is
married or divorced until the post-
man has come.
"These conceptions deal a stag-
gering blow to the American lawyer,
with his rigid conceptions of juris-
diction, domicile, and sufficient
cause," commented Mr. Butler. "In
fact I couldn't help but wonder,
when I met in one of the Russian
prisons, a genial barber who was
serving eight years for the mur-
der of his wife, just why he had
bothered to kill her when a di-
vorce offered a remedy as speedy
and complete."
PROFESSOR TALKS
ON MATHEMATICS
"The Foundation of Mathema-
tics, as a subject lends itself very
well to all who are cultured or in-
telligent," said 'Pro. E. R. Hedrick
of the Southern Branch of the
University of California, when he
spoke Friday afternoon before a
large gathering in Angell hall.
Professor Hedrick, a former student
at Michigan, is a brilliant mathe-
matician and has had articles
published in various periodicals.
"Many of our cherished beliefs
must be forsaken or changed due
to the intervention of new theories
or. discovery, Professor Hedrick
continued, citing the shocks that
the discovery of the sphericity of
the world and Einstein's theory
had given to the various concep-
tiops of space. "Tolerance is a
wonderful attribute and leads to
investigation and perhaps adoption
of new beliefs," he went on.
"One seldom deems his beliefs
as. the highest truth but regards
then as merely his conception of
what he thinks are the fundamen-
tal facts of his particular science."
He advocated that all scientists
should not fail to express all their
beliefs in order that they may be
examined and perhaps subjected to
change. "It is lovely," he added,
"for we mathematicians to think
that our proofs are the absolute.
truth; and that our science is the
most logical, but in reality Math-
ematics is still in an experimental
stage.°

r

i

Captain Albert Mariano, who has son, Sir Finn Malmgreen, perished
been convalcescing in a Stockholm, on the ice near Spitzbergen in the
Sweden, hospital following the am- same disaster. Captain Mariano is
putation of his leg as the result of partibt uinoraRo enhen ito
the Italia disaster, was snapped the numerous details and phases
with Mrs. Anna Malmgren, whose ( connected with the disaster.
IF COLLEGE STUDENT LOSES JOB,

COMPANY ERRED, SAYS BLACKE T T
If a college student has a job published in the series, which was
during summer vacation and gets begun in February, 1926, with a
fired after a couple of weeks, he pamphlet on "The Life History of
shouldn't worry about it, because Automobiles," written by Professor
it's really the fault of the corn- Griffin.
pany who hired him, according to About 100 Michigan manufactur-
the results of a study on factory ers co-operated with Professor
labor turnover in Michigan, com- Blackett in compiling the material
ministration, and published in for the study, according to the in-
pleted recently by Prof. O. W. Black- troduction to the book, and ap-
ett, of the School of Business Ad- proximately 113,000 employes are
booklet form. involved.
"In general," says Professor l Professor Blackett's study con-
Blackett, "a company's quit rate sists principally in noting the
and discharge rate reflect its per- I trends in Michigan industry as to
sonnel policy and measure the the number of men who have been
efficiency of the personnel admin- employed, discharged, and who
istration." have quit during the various
Of course there are numerous ex- months of the period covered.
ceptions to the rule, Professor Comparisons are made between the
Blackett admits, so if one is fired situation. in state and nation, like-
after stubbing his foreman's toe wise between various specific in-
at a dance Saturday night, then dustries and the general condi-
the company need not particularly tions.
be censured. .
The booklet is one of a series WIEMAN TO VISIT
published by the bureau of bus AU
ness research, a branch of the ALUMNI ON TOUR
School of Business Administration E
designed to facilitate the research Coach Tad E. Wieman of the
work of members of the staff. The Varsity football team is combining
present volume is the eleventh
______________ ______a trip to Chicago, where he andE
ICELEBRATE "HOBO DAY"'other Conference coaches are dis-
CELERATE 60B0 DAY cussing schedule matters and other
questions relative to the relations
"Put on your old clothes and yell between Big Ten schools.
like hell," is the watchword ob- At noon, Dec. 10 he wiil speak at
served by the students at the Uni- Sturgis before Michigan alumni
versity of Kansas when they cele- and civic clubs, the night of the
brate their traditional Hobo Day. same day he speaks to the Michi-
The students attend their classes gan alumni and Niles high school
on this day as usual and the in- football teams- at Niles. At noon
structors do What they can to of Dec. 11, he will address a group
maintain order and discipline. All I of alumni and civic clubs at South
dress in the oldest clothes that they Bend, Ind., and that evening af
are able to procure. Those failing group of alumni of Benton Harbor1
to comply with the style for the and St. Joseph, and the high school
day find themselves at the mercy football teams from both those
of the multitude of hoboes who are cities at Benton Harbor.
never backward about expressing
their desire for company. Streets -_______
are blocked off and rallys are held
all over the campus throughout the!4
day with the head cheer leaden
acting as chief of hoboes.
i;

CR EWASIEFFICHT
Vestris Sinking Sheer Stupidity
SBritishAnd American
Seamen Report
JESSOP BLAIMS CAPTAIN
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Dec. 7.-The reports
of the British and American
nautical advisers at a federal com-
missioners' investigation of the
sinking of the British liner Ves-
tris agree that the officers of the
vessel were Incompetent.
Although they differ in tone, that1
of Capt. E. A. Jessop, U. S. N
retired, being uncompromising and
severe while that of Capt. Henry
McConkey of the Cunard line was
more restrained, both declare the
S O S should have been sent out
six hours earlier and that the offi-
cers did not take proper steps to
see to the safety of the passengers.
Capt. McConkey tempered his
criticism of Capt. William J. Carey,
who went down with his ship, by
calling attention to the captain's
long service and perfect record.
He said there might have been
reasons, which the inquiry had not
brought out which led the captain
to delay his S O S, and urged with-
holding judgment on the captain
until a review could be made by
the British Board of Trade.
Capt. Jessop, however, did not
spare Capt. Carey nor other offi-
cers in his charge of inefficiency
and bad sea practice.
"History holds nd incidents, to
my knowledge, to compare with
the incompetence and sheer stu-
pidity of this exhibition."
SCENIC PAINTINGS
TO BE EXHIBITED'
AT ALUMNI HALL;
Thirty-six paintings, by nineteen
living artists of southern Califor-
nia, will be placed on exhibit
starting Wednesday, Dec. 12, in the
south gallery of Alumni Memorial
hall. The collection is owned by
Harry C. Bentley, President of the
Bentley School of Accounting and
Finance of Boston.
The collection, is loaned for ex-
hibition purposes in order that art
lovers throughout the country may
see what the painters of southern
California are accomplih ig, with
the added hope that it will stim-
ulate a greater interest in te
works of living American artists.
It is being shown here under the
auspices of the Ann Arbor Art asso-
ciation.
Interest is expected to run high
in this showing since neither time,
effort, nor money has been spared
in assembling this well-balanced
collection which is neither ultra-
modern nor monotonously acade-
mic, but, as a whole, is fairly rep-
resentative of the best art of that
section of the country.
Among those whose works are
included are, Carl Oscar Borg who
has come to occupy a well deserved
position in public esteem as one
of the foremost interpreters of
Western life and landscape, Helena
Dunlap a native daughter of Cali-
fornia who is slowly coming to be
recognized as among the fiv great
exponents of impressions in Amer-
ica, hnd John Frost son .of A. B.
Frost, whose pen for many decades
interpreted the humorous side of
American life.
IIl

MOLLUSK SECTION OF UNIVERSITY ZOOLOGY MUSEUM
HAS MANY SPECIMENS OF FRESH WATER CRUSTACIANS
One of the most interesting see- The division has two large store- The work of this department is
g e-rooms on the first floor of the Mu- connected with the collection anmd
tions of the zoology museum in the seum, and access to photographic study of crabs, shrimps, fairy
University Museums is said to be and optical apparatus. There are shrimps, and other forms of this
the division of mollusks, which also nine rooms devoted to mollusk same general family.
consists of forms having an exte- vwork, and a special library upon The collections in this division
rior shell, such as snails and mus- the subject. I were started about 1910 by Dr. A. S.
sels, etc. This division, which is At present Miss Winslow has Pearse, formerly honorary curator
headed by Miss Mina M. Winslow been doing research work with live in the Museum. The collections
as curator, has its Deginning in specimens, land snails, etc. She since that time have been aug-
the earliest collections of the has been breeding specimens to de- mented by crustacians given to the
University Museum, the only o- -o i Museum by the department of con-
units surviving from these collec- EDITOR'S NOTE I servation, and the Wisconsin bi-
tions being some lots of mollusks. - -I ological survey. Today there are
the present mollusk division and I This is the third of a series I about 25,000 specimens in the de-
Thus there is a connection between i of articles being published by I partment, some collected by Creas-
the famous pioneers in Michigan i The Daily illustrative of the I er, himself, in co-operation with
museum work, Asa Gray, one of rrk now being conducted in 1 the Wisconsin biological survey.
the greatest of American bo tani;sE :e University Museum.

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