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December 07, 1928 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T- E. MTCHI-AN- D-A 1LV

PRMAY, DUCENMER 7,1028

.....I. ................ . . .A.......... - -----

REVAMPED

RINK

AT

COLISEUM

TO

OPEN

TOMaORROW

T RIBUNE TROPHY
CHOICE WILL BE
nr DIFFnCULT T ASK

Willmarth Will Lead Big Ten Will Act On
1929 Siartan Harriers Poor Sportsmanship

1

VI IILD UN-IIIINRV
Special' Numbers Of Fancy And°]
Speed Skating Are Arranged
For Formal Opening
PUCK TEAM rf USE RINK

;lut

Although the formal opening of
the new artificial ice skating rink
in the revamped Coliseum featur-
ing an array of fancy and speed
skaters specially provided by- the
athletic department will. not be
until next Monday, the actual
opening of the rink: will take place
tomorrow evening when the gen-
eral public will be given' their: first.
opportunity to test the. newly for-
med ice.
Rink Is One Of Largest
The completion of this rink fol-
lowing closely after the opening of,
the Intramural building marks the
second big step this year in the
expansion of the University of
Michigan athletic department un-
der the direction of Fielding: Yost.
and will afford students the use

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As the time approaches for the'
awarding of the Chicago Tribune
trophy to the most valuable player
in the Big Ten, speculation is rife
1among football fans as to who willI
receive the coveted honor. Each
Conference school= has one or more,
candidates to put forward as a!
claimant for the award, and the
local press are loud in their praise'
of these individuals.
The Tribune trophy has been of-
fered since 1925 to the player in
the Conference who is of the most
value to his team, whether the
team. be a winning or losing eleven.
The selection is made by sportsj
writers who are well acquainted'
with the merits of the individual
players.I
Otto Pommerening is Michigan'sj
leading candidate for the trophy
this season. A tower of strengthf
(Continued on. -Page Seven)
Detroit Tigers Seek To

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of one of the largest artificial ice
skating .surfaces in the country
for a period of approximately half
of the. school year.
The rink itself has an area of
16,640 square feet, measuring 208
feet by 80 feet, all of which will be
used as a hockey rink by the Var-
sity intheir games during the
coming season, thereby giving rise
to the expectation that Michigan
shouldtdevelop hockeyhsquadsain
the future of an even higher cali-
bre than those of the past, espec-
ially whei it is considered that
they will be able to begin practice
about Nov. 1 each year instead of
waiting until the weather is cold
enough to freeze natural ice.
Coliseum Completely Rebuilt
The front of the Coliseum whichI
has been completely rebuilt has a
much larger lobby and check room
with new equipment throughout.
The skate room which is equipped
with new machinery of the latest
type for sharpening and repairing
skates and a candy booth com-
plete the unit of rooms along the
end of the rink. New facilities for!
the comfort of the skaters havel
also been installed.
At the rear of a large balconyl
looking out over the rink have been
placed improved locker rooms and
a shower for the use of the hockey
teams Only. Besides the balcony
eight rows of seats running the
length of the rink make it possible
to seat a much larger crowd than
(Continued on Page Seven) f

j mn r' eagu ue wn
With minor league baseball own-'
ers in session at Toronto, mid-win-
I ter trading in players is becoming
[brisk. The biggest of the deals
I accomplished so far involves the
Detroit Tigers, who are seeking re-
inforcement after a rather disas-
trous reason in the last American
league campaign, and the Toronto
club of the International circuit.
Dale Alexander, sensational first
baseman, and Johnny Prudhomme,
star pitcher, are the chief figures
in the deal. Detroit is believed to
have parted with $100,000 and
three players to obtain these two
' f roisngyoungsters. Just what
players President Navin of the De-
troit club will send to the Leafs
are not, yet known although first
baseman Sweeney, who was a mild
sensation in the first part of the
season this spring, will be one of
them with two pitchers thrown in.
Sam Gibson, Stoner, Holloway,
Smith and Billings are the hurlers
who may make a change of uni-
form.
The purchase of Prudhomme
comes as somewhatof a surprise
since.the star Toronto deceiver had
been reported as a New York Yan-
kee prospect. During his career in
the International league, the 24-
year-old right hander has twirled
two no-hit games. Alexander is a
college man, graduating from Mil-
ligan college, Tennessee, where he
was a three sport man, starring in
football, basketball and baseball.

c r,, E:~ d IJBooing, razzing of officials, and
EAST LANSING, Dec. 6.-Ted' JVLINiU'JURJI E other testimonies of poor sports-
Willrmarth, star distance runner at manship are slated for discard in
Michigan State college, was elec-' the Western conference. Big Ten
ted captain of the 1929 cross- oh KeClsy Ochedu*et!ine athletic directors have decided
country teiti late Tuesday. The O Frevis Schern led that these forms of rowdyism must
election was viewed as a surprise go, and are ready to take drasticI
as Capt. Lauren Brown was expect- steps, if necessary , to stop the
Sed to be chosen to succeed himself. DIVISION MADE IN SQUAD: jeering.
Five major letters were awarded, - -Education will be tried first and!
one minor letter, and four minor The Freshman wrestlers will not, if this fails the crowds will be
sport service sweaters, Major let- according to the announcement policed. Fear has been expressedl
ter winners were: Floyd Roberts,- made yesterday by Coach Keen, in- by the athletic directors that ifj
Rapid River; Ted Willmarth, De- vade the domain of the Varsity some radical action is not taken to
troit; Lauren Brown, Detroit; El- squad to engage the Sophomore stop the means of basketball
mer Roossien, Grand Haven; and grapplers in the bouts previously crowds showing their dissapproval
Leonard Dowd, Hartford. John ( scheduled for this afternoon. of officials which became preval-
Reid or Ironwood, was awarded a The sudden shift in plans was ant at last year's games that con-
minor letter. Minor sport service made to allow the members of both ference basketball competition will
sweaters were given: Rich ard sq uads, many of whom are entered be stopped.
Maples, Fordson; Alton Brayton, in the inter-fraternity tournament Acting at the instigation of the!
Howell; Stanley Frisbie, Fruitport, which commences next week, to directors, the coaches last week de-
and Donald Price, East Tawas. round into condition for that com- cided upon a vigorous educational
S1oberts is the only member of petition instead. program to stamp out the all un-
the 1928 team to be lost by gradu- Tournamen4 Is Postponed sportsmanlike conduct at games
I ation to the squad of next year. While the Sophomore-Freshman this year.
meet was being called off, the date Illinois was the first school to
Rem ke eam Atfor the All-University wrestling initiate such a program. George
SRemake Team At meet was set back, so that it will Huff, director of athletics, yester-
, now, be conducted on December 18, day sent letters to all Illinois stu-
ers Meeting In Toronto 19 and 20. dents asking their cooperation in
With the inter-fraternity and the abolishment of the razzing at
SHe comes up to major rather high- All-Campus tournaments scheduled the Illinois school.
;y recommended as a good hitter, for next week, it was thought ad-__
hatting .382 last year. Some 31 visable that this meet be post-
homers, 11 triples and 46 doubles poned so that those desiring, could MAJESTIC
went into the making of his per- enter the other two. Besides this,
centage, while he stole 15 bases as Coach Keen figures that such a Cosmopolitan
well. postponement would allow the
Close critics of the work of both new nen to secure more training,gy
en ediffer as to the probable sue- while those football men who re-
cess of Johnny Prudhomme in de- Gently joined the squad would
ceiving big league hitters although have moretime to work into a
all seem agreed that Alexander hadb Squad is Divided
the ability to stick. His fielding has -r r n d
greatly improved during the last The Varsity wrestling squad now.
year and unless American league I numberig around6as been di-
yicears edtomn nehg vided into two squads with Coach
pitchers feed too many knee-high Keen in charge of the regulars
not suffer. and Captain Donahoe working out.
Other big leaue club h d with the "B" group. This division!
dOth ileague lauswhoamaewas made so more time might be--
del wt mnrlege emsi-given t personal instruction and : >
cluded the Boston Red Sox and the attentos
St. Louis Browns. The Sox were Fro .
involved with a trade with St. Paul trnmetll ea hel one,
in the American association which theomtio eachlass
centrs roud fve payes. limwith the competition in each class
centers around five players. Slimveyco. CahKeniex
Harriss, one of the 'tallest pitchers) pecy ost oh eent squx-
in bsebll nd ill ogel tirdpecting most of his present squad
in baseball, and Bill Rogell, third toetr.n tsem ieyta
sacker, will t hS t to enter, and it seems likely that
sacer wilgo to the Saints for the list will soar above 100 names,!
Alex Gaston, a catcher, and Rus- This meet should not be confused
SdScarritt, an outfielder. The with the All-Campus tournament,
fifth man in the deal was not an- methel-capu y tnen
nounced. meet held each year by the In-
n e. tramural department. The enter-
St. Louis sold pitcher Walter Beck ing requirements for the All-Cam-
to Buffalo of the International pus meet bar Varsity men, past'-or'
league and the Philadelphia Na- present, and also numeral winners
tionals sent Augie Walsh and Rus-! from taking part, while any stu-
sell Miller, pitchers, to Pacific dent enrolled in this school is al' Story by
coast clubs as well as Art Jahn, lowed to compete in the All-Uni- ELINOR GLYN
outfielder. ; versity tournament.

WABASH COLLEGE
TO OPEN SEASON
FOR PURPLE FIVE
EVANSTON, Ill., Dec. G.--The
Little Giants of Wabash college. k;Freshman Basketball Players Show
one of the strongest basketball Wreshman Srimage At
teams turne'd out in the Hoosier Feld ous e
state each year, will provide the Field House
opposition to Northwestern's quin-
tet in the opening game of the sea- TO MAKE FINAL CUT SOON
son here Saturday night, Dec. 8.
Selection of Wabash for the Coach Ray Fisher's freshman
opening engagement will provide a basketball squad, how numbering
fine test for Coach Lonborg's five about 40 players, is continuing
which faces one of the strongest daily practice in Yost Field house.
cage schedules ever taken on by a' The yearlings have the use of the
university team. The Little Giants Varsity floor on Monday and
have a strong nucleus from last Thursday afternoon, while Tues-
year's team back again and can be day, Wednesday, and Friday nights
counted on to put up a clever fight. complete their five day a week
Among the visitors will be several practice schedule.
capable players who will bear close As yet workouts have been con-
watching: Groves, center; Brooks, fined to scrimmages between the
guard, and Venir, forward. (Continued on Page Seven)

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DURING VACATION
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requir
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dising
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