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December 06, 1928 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-12-06

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER G, 1928

. THE Ml.,CH.IGA.N DAI-LY ,

PAGE THREI

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1928 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TUR~

DEATE TEAMS WIC
ENGAGE WITH INDIANA
AND OHIONEXT WERD
AFFIRMATIVE WILL CONTEST
WITH INDIANA HERE
ON WEDNESDAY
TRIOS TO CONSIDER PACT
All Big Ten Colleges But Chicago
Have Joined In Conference
Debating League
Michigan's. Varsity debate teams
are rapidly completing prepara-
tions for the intercollegiate de-
bates with Indiana and Ohio State
next week upon the question: Re- I
solved, that the United States sen-
ate should ratify the Paris Pact
without reservations.
The Michigan affirmative team
composed of Ormand J. Drake,
'30Ed., Howard Simon, '30, and Paul
Franseth, 29, will meet the Indiana
negative on Wednesday night in
Hill auditorium while the negative
team of Lawrence Hartwig, '31,
Paul J. Kern, '29, and Stanley
Dimond, Grad., will journey to Co-
lumbus to meet the Ohio State
affirmative on Thursday night.
Have\New Organization
Debating among the Big Ten
universities is being conducted
through a new organization pro-
gram this fall. The old Mid-West
and Central debating leagues have
been disorganized and in their
a place a Conference debating league
composed of all the Big Ten uni-
versities except Chicago has been
formed.
According to the regulations of
the new debating league, each uni-
versity will participate in four con-
ference debates each year. Two of
these debates will be held in the
fall and two in the spring of the
year, thus allowing the University
w teams to debate against represen-
tatives of four other universities
during the year. A different sub-
ject is to be used each semester.
Will Alternate Schedule
The second year, a similar sched-
ule is to be followed with the onet
exception that each university will
debate against the four schools ,
that year -which it did not meet
1e previous year. Under this plan,
each member of the league wil de-
bate every other member of the
league once every two years.
Under the agreement reached by1
- the league schools, all students of
each university who have the ne-K
cessary scholastic qualifications aret
eligible for competition. This pro-
visory makes graduate as well as
undergraduate students eligible for1
the teams.1
The University teams were se-
lected from the class in inter-col-
legiate debating which was resum-
ed this semester after a lapse of
a year. Other members of the same
class are continuing to study the
question and will serve as alter-
nates.
Faculty Will Leave
For Chicago Meeting
Almost the entire faculty of the
School of Education will attend the
annual meeting -of the North Cen-
tral Association of Secondary
Schools to be held in Chicago on
Saturday, December 6. H. T. Ryan,
principle of the University high
school, will also be present.
The object of this meeting of
the association is the determina-
tion of standards for the reorgan-

ization of secondary school cur-
ricula. All the committee reports
will be more or less in the form of
reviews of past work.
The report of the committee
upon which the University profes-
sors are serving, will. be made in
an endeavor to show how the
various subjects taught in the sec-
ondary schools. can contribute to}
the objectives-set up by the com-
mittee.
The first section of the work
will present a brief statement of
the work done by the committee
during the past year. The second
part of the report will contain a
short resume of the work accom-
plished in 1927.
The third section will be de-
voted to reports of the analysis of
the additional subjects of the sec-
ondary school curricula which
have been made by the various
sub-committees.
ATHENS, Ga. - Seven varsity
players and two coaches at the
University of Georgia are ill with

yrd And His Party Leave Civilization
For Two Year Stay In Antarctic Region
- - - - - -- -

I

MPOSE REGULATION

w

OF AIR DI ULTIES
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Dec. 5.-William P.
Cracken, assistant secretary of
commerce for aeronautics, was here
today to iron out differences be-
tween manufacturers in the areo-
nautical industry and government{
departments regulating their activ-
ities.
The all-day conference was de-
signed to permit an amicable dis-
cussion of the problems involved
in the approval of aircraft designs
by the government, inspection of
factories engaged in the produc-
tion of airplanes, and rules gov-
erning the government's licensing,
of approved types.
Prominent airplane manufac-
turers have felt that the industry
should impose upon Itself certain
regulations concerning the build-
ing of safe aircraft, and hasf
sought department of commerce
lations laid down by the depart-
co-operation in this project. Regu-
ment of commerce have been
worked out in co-operation withI
the industry's wishes, and it is
to permit a thorough discussion of
the problems involved in revamp-
ing the government's code that to-
day's session was called.
Subscribe to The Michigan Daily,
$4.00 a year.

Hearing Sandburg Read His Works Helps
One To Appreciate Them, Says Professor
"It is necessary to hear Sandburg I ted wrongly to the atmosphere of
render his poetry to appreciate his the poems.
works," declared Prof. N. E. Nel- For the other misconception he
son, of the rhetoric department, in assigns the responsibility to schol-
an interview yesterday. Professor ars like Prof. J. M. Manly, who, in
Nelson believes that there are his handbook of American litera-
many misconceptions of the poet's ture says that Sandburg sings his
work. poetry to a guitar accompaniment.!
"There is a peculiar singing qual- "There is music in Sandburg's
ity in -his reading, which I think potery, as even Professor Manly
may be traced to his Scandinavian will see if he goes to hear Sand-
background. the accent of his burg read his poetry some night."
verse is almost °entirely musical by Professor Nelson states that Sand-
pitch-accent, not stress-accent, and burg and not Professor Manly, who
occasionally his lines are ugly if has lived in Chicago as Sandburg
read in the orthodox English way. has, has interpreted the atmos-
In his reading there is a bouy- ? phere of Chicoga.
ancy that removes the colgging "Sandburg's point of view, his
weight of many a word; at the end spiritual state if you like, is largely
of the line there is usually a decid- determined by the civilization he
ed lift to a note that sings on over developed in," Professor Nelson
the next line." continued. "One doesn't want
Professor Nelson states that from him the sophisticated imper-
there are two misconceptions of sonalism of contemporary French.
Sandburg's poems. "The first may and English intellectuals. He is a
be traced to an ill-considered re- vigorous, personal response to a
view of "Chicago," in which the; vigorous and crushing environ-i
critic claimed that the poem was ment. As a middle-westerner and
'brutal'; since then, the poem has Scandinavian, I like Sandburg's
been unreasonably burdened with expression of emotions; I can easily
such a reputation." Nelson main- see how it might repel others.
tains, on the other hand, that del- Whether his appeal is universal,
icacy and tenderi ess are the ob- whether it will last, is not partic-
vious traits of the poet's works. He ularly our business. The fact is.
believes that b ,ea ase this tender- that he has been accepted by the
ness and delicacy have been ex- men he wanted to reach-men like
erted on deserct brickyards, in- Carl VanDoren, Sherwood Ander-
stead of hollyhocks and tiger lilies, !son, and William R. Benet."
'the majority of ci-itics, have reac-

WIEMAN AND TAPPING
WILL SPEAK ON TOUR
Six talks in four days have been
planned for Tad Wieman, head
football coach, and T. Hawley Tap-
ping, field secretary of the Alumni
association, it was announced yes-
terday.
Coach Wieman and Mr. Tapping
will start their tour Friday night
with talks at a meeting of the Uni-
versity of Michigan club at Escan-
abe. Saturday they will be present
at a meeting of Michigan alumni
in Green Bay, Wisconsin.
Monday, will be a full day with
speeches in Sturgis, Mich., at a
noon luncheon, and at Niles, at an
evening meeting of the University
of Michigan club of that city. Ac-
cording to present plans there will
be no let-up on Tuesday when
Coach Wieman and Mr. Tapping
will appear at meetings in South
Bend at noon, and in Benton Har-
bor, at a night meeting of the new
Benton Harbor-St. Joe alumni
club. No other engagements for
this trip have been planned as yet
but it is possible that several others
including especially noon meetings
will be arranged.

i
I
I

PITTSBURGH. - Lee . Meadows,
on the voluntary retired list of the
Pittsburgh Pirates, will report for
spring training

Commander Richard T Byrd
Who has left New Zealand with his party on a 2,000 mile ocean
journey to the Antarctic region. Prof. Lawrence M. Gould of the,
University is a member of this expedition, which will remain in the
unexplored Antarctic areas for two years. These photos show Byrd at
the wheel, and his ship, the City of New York.
BUMMING IN FLORIDA IS AN ART
THAT TAKES UNMITIGATED STUDY

is not merely a tea room
We feature the Unusual
iS
"Your futurereaad from the Tea up
Each day we serve a dainty Fifty cel Luncheon
Tea Leaf Reading "Gratis'

TOYS

GIFTS

FUN

NOISE

The gentle art of standing in as, vice to would-be bummers c
dignified a position as possible, ex- around student circles. .
tending one's arm in a-supplicatory eran dispenses advice freely
manner and wiggliig the thumb extent of telling intereste
beseechingly, in other words bum- mers just how to stand, t
ming one's way to one's destina- appropriate sort of clot
tion or thereabouts, is considered wear, and expressions to a
in Florida the summit of gentle- Bumming, however, is n
manly polish, if we may believe an an unmitigated virtue and
article published recently in the people suppose. Many and
Florida "Alligator." are the tales of lost hours
According to this explanation clothing ruined from
bumming, and a knowledge of how weather conditions, missed
to bum in the most .efficient man- Lincolns or Packards and
ner, is a prime requisite-of a college of all, missed meals. One
student's education. The greenest prizing man has compiled
freshman at Florida must have ata statistics which show that1
least a rudimentary acquaintance I dent body at Florida, in
with the process, and tips and ad- wester bums 879,641 miles.

circulate
ne vet-
y, to the
d bum-
be most
hing to
assume.
got such
d joy as
d woeful
of sleep,
adverse
rides in
d, worst
enter-
a set of
the stu-
one se-

CANDY
AT THE
Women's League
AND
Interchurch Bazaar
BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
December 7 and 8

An ideal seting for your Brid I ea

Phone 7036

31 2 S. State

Ad thru courtesy of Moe's Sport Shop

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We have a, varied selection correctly framed.
Have His iploma Framed
for a Christmas Present
WITH OUR FAMOUS
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- E
- I.

- J <I
1, s -.

You can't afford to postpone
your Christmas Shopping
any longer.
Today is only December 6th,
but do you realize that there
are only 15 more shopping
days until Christmas vacation?

#,

Solve your Christmas Shopping problem
by
Reading The Michigan Daily
A few minutes with The Michigan Daily will
save hours of walking and asking. Make up
your list from Daily advertisements. Two
hours of your time spent in shopping now will
be worth the entire time spent after Friday,
December 21 st.

r

.-
,
/A
, .. ._

influenza.

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