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November 20, 1928 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-20

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T

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20,

-~ I - - - - . . . . I

ublished every morning except Monday
mg the University year by the Board in
ntrol of Student Publications-
Member of Western Conference Editorial
ociation.
Che Associated Press is .exclusively en-
ed to the use for republication of all news
patches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news pub-
ed herein.
Entered at the psto~fice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as second class matter. Special rate
posta granted by Third Assistant Post-
iter General.
ubscription by carrier, $4.o; by mail,
Jflces: Ann Arbor Press Building, Ma-
d Street.
hones: Editorial, 4925; Busmei, 2121,.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
KENNETH G. PATRICK
itor...................Paul J. Kern
:y Editor......... .....Nelson 3. Smith
ws Editor............Richard C. Kurvink
orts Editor.... .. Morris Quinn
men's Editor........Sylvia S. Stone
tor Michigan Weekly....J. Stewart Hooker
sic and Drama....... ......R. L. Askren
istant City Editor......Lawrence R. Klein
Night Editors
rence N. Edelson Charles S. Monroe
eph E. Howell Pierce Ro-mberg
nald J. Kline George E. Simons
George C.,Tilley
Reporters

ul T,. Adams
irris Alexander
her Anderson
A. Askren
rtram Askwith
wise Behymer'
thur Bernstein
ton C. Bove
ibel Charles
R. Chubb
ank E. Cooper
len Domine
uglas Edwards
Ilborg. Egeland
ben J. Feldman
iaonre Folmer
iliam Gentry
wrence Hartwig
hard Jung
ares R.Kaufman
ith Kelsey
mald E. Laymnan

C. A. Lewis
Marian MacDonald
Henry Merry
N. S. Pickard
Victor Rabinowitz
Anne Schel
Rachel Shearer
Robert Silbar
Howard Simon
Robert L. Sloss
Arthur R. Strubel
Edith Thomas
Beth Valentine
Gurney 'Williams
Walter Wilds
George E. Wohigemuth
Robert Woodroo fe
Toseph A. Russell
Cadwell Swanson
A. Stewart
Edward L. Warner Jr.
Cleland Wyllie

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
EDWARD L. HULSE
Assistant Manager-RAY MOND WACHTER
AdvrtiingDepartment Managers
Advertising.. ...e K. Scherer
Advertising.... ......A. James Jordan
Advertising.Carl W. - Hammer
Service................HerbertE. Varnum
Circulation............George S. Bradley
Accounts............Lawrence E. Walkley
Publications............Ray M. Hoelich
Assistants
Irving Binzer AssJack Horwich
Donald Blackstone Dix Humphrey
Mary Chase Marion Kerr
eanette Dale Lillian Kovinsky
-erner Davis Bernard Larson
Bessie Egeland Leonard Littlejohn
Helen Geer Hollister Mabley
Ann Goldberg Jack Rose
Faser Halverson Carl F. Schemm
Hailon Sherwood Upton
A'aus erwg Marie Welstead
Walter Yeagley
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1928
Night Editor-GEORGE E. SIMONS
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
Quietly and unassumingly, with
none of the press-agenting which
often accompanies scientific re-
search work of the more sensation-
al type, more than 60 scientists
here at Michigan are carrying on
individually important investiga-
tions in every type of natural sci-
enee to be found in the country.
Under the leadership of Dr.
Alexander G. Ruthven, director of
the University museum, these
men and women, ranging from am-
bitious student to world famous
professor, are applying all their
time, energy, enthusiasm, and
training in the way which they
think best to problems of their
own choosing in commendable
attempts to add to the sum total
of the world's knowledge.
The frequency with which these
attempts are successful is most
gratifying. The campus as a whole
knows very little of the results for
they are usually complex scientific
matters which circulate largely
among their fellow scientists who
appreciate most fully thet' impor-
tance. It is only as these findings
are applied to practical things that
the man in the street becomes
aware of them.
Perhaps the major reason for the
high type of work which is being
done at the museum lies in the
very fact that the scientists there
are completely divorced from out-
side distractions and are undis-
turbed by the prying eyes of the
sensation seekers. In any event,
it must be recognized that they
are carrying on a great work and
that as their work is successful just
so much is the cause of civilization
being advanced and just so much
is the name of Michigan being re-
membered, not merely as the home
of a great athletic plant, but also
as the home of scholars and re-
search of the most worthwhile type.
0 -
BEAT IOWA
Beaten, but still, possessed of a
splendid opportunity to tie for the
Conference title providing Min-
nesota does what many football
followers predict and beats Wis-
consin, and possessing a possible
chance of winning an undisputed
chamnionshin. nrviding Ohio

performances and public sentiment
will be worth less than nothing.
What is important is that the
Michigan squad and the Michigan
student body are convinced that
their Varsity can and will beat
Iowa.
Campus interest, already cen-
tered for more than a week on the
Iowa game, will be raised to a
fever heat of excitement at the
third and last pep meeting of the!
year, to be held Friday night in'
Hill auditorium; and Michigan
spirit, loyal to its team, will be
given an opportunity to doubly ex-
press itself.
First of all, it will be given its
first chance to tangibly recognize
the team that came back fighting
after four successive defeats and
trounced the championship-bound
Illini; and in the second place, it
will express its firm conviction that
the Fighting Wolverines, after a
well-earned and much-deserved
let up, will rise with all of the de-
termination that met Wisconsin
and Illinois and play a brand of
football inferior to none in the
Middle West:
Michigan will win Saturday, but
it can only accomplish that end
with the personal loyalty and sup-
port of every student. Hill auditor-
ium must be packed Friday night
and every possible confidence ex-
pressed in the team that is closing
its season with a record of fight-
ing spirit that will rank it with the
greatest of Michigan teams. The
team has demonstrated that it will
give and take all that is humanly
possible. Its success or failure lies
only in the manifestation of the
spirit that stands behind the men
on the field.
A graduate of Cambridge uni-
versity maintains that we work far
more than is necessary to obtain
a living. He must have forgotten
his undergraduate days.
Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less than30oo
word it possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants will, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should t be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of the Daily.
I.
MICHIGAN SPIRIT
To the Editor:
Who is the brave lad who wrote
that article in Sunday's Daily? He
no doubt helps to kill Michigan's
real spirit rather than boost it. He
no doubt helped to do away with
the cheering section so that he
could sit on the fifty-yard line.
The students were deprived of a
chance to get together and show
their spirit.
How does this sound? "Michigan
State vs. Michigan, no cheering
section required for this game."
That's what it all amounted to.
You would have had spirit and
plenty of it if you had wanted it
badly enough. It isn't the students'
fault at all, and the sooner some
of you political-minded job holders
find that out, the better and
stronger Michigan's spirit will be.
Some day Michigan's cheering
section will be spoken of all over
the country, but not until it is
good enough to be worthy of its
place in every game. You cannot
expect a cheering student to make
any kind of an impression by yells
when he is surrounded by hun-
dreds of Neutralists who come only
to see the game regardless of who
wins.

H. C. H., Grad.
MORE SWIMMING TIME
To the Editor:
With the opening of the new
natatorium in the Intra-mural
building the men of the University
find themselves in a position to
enjoy the use of two large swim-
ming pools. The women of the
University, however, are still con-
fined to the tiny pool in Barbour
gymnasium which is hardly great-
er than the regulation bathtub in
size, and to the use of the Union
pool one night a week, outside of
the morning classes in swimming.
The women realize and appreci-
ate the generosity of the men in
allowing them to use the Union
pool as they have in the; past, and
now that the men have such in-
creased facilities for swimming it
is to be hoped that the hours when
women may use the Union pool
will be extended.
At present women have open
plunge at the Union only on
Thursday evenings. If the women
were given one afternoon and an-
other evening in which to use the
Union pool, many more of them
could be accommodated, and a
nnUlar snort could he nartieinnt-

ENOUGH
ENOUGH
Commercialism has entered the
thitherto inviolable realm of the
church. The offertory sung at the
Convocation last Sunday was "It
Is Enough."
ODE TO LOUIE LUM
Long purveyor to deep desire,
O sweet relief to famished lives,
Thine celestial spirit doth
aspire
To grateful heaven; here it
strives
To fill, unending, aching voids;
To heap extended hands with
food
Whilst gasping, pleading
adenoids
Demand again in accents rude-
"Another dish of eggs fo-yong,
A piping, fragrant pot of tea,
Some gently smothered Chinese
chop,
A double order, then a re---"
Thine delectable, dainty steaks,
(Each one doth measure eight
by ten)
Just ask the man whose belly
aches-
Two days from now he'll come
again.
So let us raise a paean of
praise,
Loud chant the excellencies of
Lum.
May he be happy all his days
And not too warm in life to come.
Tap Faucet.
Probably the reason the sinking
of the Vestris turned into such a
disaster was the fact that all the
crew were standing about taking
pictures.'
We read that Washington
has themost efficient speak-
easies in the United States.
Well, we are in favor of gov-
ernment operation of every-
thing, even speak-easies.
* * *
0

Music And Drama
o
"THE SECOND °MAN"
Reviewed by R. Leslie Askren

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ANN ARLOR

Conceived in

disillusion and

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brought forth in a spirit of satiric
fun, Behrman's comedy of "The
Second Man" and the trials and
temptations Clark Storey under-
goes in entertaining him, is a fas-
cinating study in "profound dis-
illusion," with the emphasis laid
on neither.
The manner in which Warburton
Gamble handled the part of the
stately Sir Colenso Ridgeon in
Shaw's "The Doctor's Dilemma" led
to a certain amount of doubtful
speculation at his being cast for
the part of the sprightly and civi-
lized Clark Storey. But a correc-
tion in the program gave the part
to Alan Mowbray, and with very
successful results. He was able to
flip out his lines in the properly
effortless manner of one flicking
an ash from his sleeve, and gen-
erally played his bit with the rai-
fied humor that author Behrman
sought. Elizabeth Risdon left
something to be wondered at in her
conception of the age of her char-
acter, but her talent and her ex-
traordinary voice control made her
interpretation more convincing
than the author's writing. Peg
Entwistle as the love-torn Monica
Grey did charming work and gave
splendid support to such opposites
as Storey and Austin Strong. As
the latter, Neal Caldwell was a
pitiful figure, a very convincing
love-sick idiot.
Without the brilliance of imagi-
nation that the Shaw piece showed,
"The Second Man" played steadily
in a charming vein of high comedy
that took the edge off the disil-
lusionment and general sense of
futility it might easily have given.

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* *

I

PLAY PRODUCTION

i
i

We will run no further
query on the case of Mary
Gold today.

II

v.. O.

Beginning tonight and running
through Thursday night, Play Pro-
duction is offering their second
bill, in a laboratory way, composed
of Maurice Maeterlinck's one-act
play, "The Intruder," followed by
W. S. Gilbert's soul startling
comedy, "Tom Cobb."
The organization of the program
promises to present a startling con-
trast between the mystic, and at
times eerie, symbolism of the Mae-
terlinck effort and the belly-
wracking stabs of Gilbert's comedy.
The cast which is handling the
various parts is mainly composed
of new faces, not drawn from the
very, successful cast of the last
show, "The Little Journey."

Iv

Congress Will Do Little But
Talk This Term.
-Headline.

The Chicago Tribune, self-
termed the World's Greatest News-1
paper, last Saturday printed a
picture captioned with a glowing
and inspiring recital of the fight-
ing prowess of Bob Brown, captain
of the University of Iowa team,
They had the name and the team
right, but the picture they used
was one of Bob Brown, former
Michigan captain and at present
line coach here.
Something's Gotta Be Done
At Saturday's game. the
band, including the clarinet
players, marched out in an or-}
derly manner and played the
Yellow and Blue as usual; and
out of the 50,000 people in the
stadium, exactly 3,048 students
and alumni sang all the words
of the first verse, 42 sang the
words of the second verse, and
one student--one lone student
-managed to sing the last
verse.
* * *
This student had a frosh bible
under his coat and his head was
not only bared but bowed, so that
he could sneak a look at the words.
* * *
This is a deplorable situa-
tion, and one that must not
only be viewed with alarm but
remedied very shortly lest one,
of our glorious traditions goes
down in a chaos of inarticulate
mutterings.
* * *
Frinstance: Here's the way the
second verse of the Yellow and
Blue is rendered by the greater
majority of the student body:
* * *
"Blue are the billoooows that
dum dum da dum
Do dah da dahh dah daaaaa;
Blue are the UMPAHHHH that
dum do deooo
WHAT is the next line, B11111?
Blue are the bum bum bo bum
Beeeee,
And blue is the something that
do do do do deeee;,
H A I L L L L r! !
Hail to the Colorzzz that dum dum
deummmm

i

R. L. A.

IN DETROIT

This week in Detroit presents a
number of amusing and interest-
ing attractions which should
amuse the light-minded theater-
goer.
the Shubert Lafayette is another
important item on the amusement
list. The first time this show has
ventured the often amazing un-
sophistication of "the road," it's
satiric wise-cracks and clever par-
odies should appeal to the isolated
cosmopolitan who stifles his none
too vague longings for New York
under a he-mannish, Mid Western,
form of trucullence.
"Lovely Lady," at the Shubert
Detroit combines the lure of really
appealing music with the lovely
Mitzi herself, who should be quite
sufficient entertainment . for the
charm-hounds who confess their
chief preoccupation with legs,
mostly female, alack,, but not so
much alas.

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R. L. A.

A4r y N +Yl* * i * ?.T1 f

With a past reputation for stage
successes, Mitzi is to appear in De-
troit in a new musical comedy
success, "Lovely Lady," which
Messrs. Shubert will presents at the
Shubert Detroit Opera house,
starting Nov. 18. According to ad-
vance reports, "Lovely Lady" is
based on the French play by
Birabeau, "Dejeuner de.Soleil," and
is a decided departure from the
type of musical comedy in which
Mitzi has made her past reputation.
A company of 100 is headed by a
star supporting cast including Jack
Sheehan, comedian of "Katja,"
Doris Patston, English beauty im-
ported to play the feminine lead in
Ziegfield's "Louie the 14th," Jack
Squires of "A Night in Spain"
fame, Hazel Harris, Wesley Pierce,
Clarence Harvey, Frank Greene,
the Lucille sisters, and an Alber-
tina Rasche ballet.I

the
ies i (] ommerc&

THE air map of America is now in the making.-.on
the ground.
Ten years ago, there were 218 miles of air mail routes with
two station stops; to-day, a network of sky roads bridges
the country from the Atlantic to the Pacific and from
Canada to the Gulf of Mexico.
Can you imagine this growth without electricity-without,
illuminated airports.-without trunk lines studded with
electric beacons?

A majority of the beacon
lights used in airport and
airway illumination have
been designed and manu-

Men of vision are building for increasing traffic of the air:
Soon, the skies will be filled with commerce.

HURRAH FOR THE VELOTW.

r

A TI

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