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September 29, 1928 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1928-09-29

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Jr

Lw q~kan

74 atl

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

1. XXIX, No. 6.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER, 29, 1928

EIGHT PAGES

SMITH WILL DISCUSS
PROHIBITION QUESTION
DEMOCRATIC NOMINEE PLANS
ADDRESS TOMORROW
IN MILWAUKEE

HOLDS

PRESS

MEETING

Standard-Bearer Replies to Editor-
ial Attack From St. Paul
Pioneer-Press
(By Associated Press)
Gov. Smith's train en route to
Milwaukee, Sept. 28.-Gov. Smith
definitely announced stoday that
liewould discuss the Eighteenth
Amendment and the Volstead Act
in his speech tomorrow night in
Milwaukee.
The Democratic presidential
nominee made this statement at a
press conference on board his train
today during which he replied to
an editorial attack on his inland
waterway remarks last night which
apeared today in the St. Paul
Pioneer-Press, reiterated his posi-
tion on water power and agreed
that his St. Paul meeting was the
"biggest and most enthusiastic"
political gathering he ever saw.
Challenges Contention
Challenging the contention in
the St. Paul editorial that he had
failed to take into account, in his
attack on the Republican admin-
istration for alleged failure to pro-
vide a comprehensive inland wa-f
terway system, the fact that the
Mississippi already i an inland
waterway with a fleet of govern-
ment steamers and barges carry-
ing large cargoes of freight, the
governor said:
"The man that wrote this edi-
torial confuses the physical devel-
opment of a waterway with the or-
ganization of a corporation to run
both. He is just tied up in a knot,
that is all."
Asked if he would extend his
government ownership water
power formula to include govern-
ment operation of the plant at
Muscle Shoals, the Governor said
that would "all depend upon the
circumstances."
Governor Answers Query
"If the power authorities can
make it desirable and agreeable
and bargain for the other opera-
tions, provided the government
can control the rates, that is one
thing. It may be possible at some
sites that you could not get pri-
vate operation."
s"It all depends uponsthe circum-
stances and conditions. You can-
not lay down a hard and fast rule.
The only definite principle you can
agree to isthat the site itself and
the machinery for development
can never be in the hands of a
private company. This is a defi-
nite principle now. The machinery
for operation depends upon the
circumstances."
JOURNALISM MEN
WILL MEET HERE
Two conventions of journalism
associations will be held jointly
3t Ann Arbor during the Christ-
mast recess, it was announced yes-
terday by Prof. J. L. Brumm, head
of the Department of Journalism.
The annual convention of the
American Association of Schools
and Department of Journalism, of
which Professor Brumm is secre-
tary and, treasurer, will be held at
the same time that the American
Association of Teachers of Jour-
nalism meets in Ann Arbor.
"These conventions will bring to
Ann Arbor representatives from all
institutes of higher learning which
conduct curricula in journalism,"
Professor Brumm says.
FORESTRY SCHOOL
LIBRAR Y CREA TED
Due to the overcrowding of the
facilities of the Natural Science Li-
brary and the increasing enroll-
ment in the Forestry school, a new
department library has been in-

stalled for the Forestry school.
The new Forestry library occu-
pies two rooms in the basement of
the Natural Science building,
which were previously laboratory
experimental rooms.
PROFESSOR H YMA
PUBLISHES BOOK
Professor Albert Hyma,. former-
ly instructor in the department of

DAILY TO ISSUE
SPORT EXTRAS
The Daily will publish football
extras after but two games this
fall, it was announced yesterday.
According to plans completed yes-
terday afternoon the first of these
will appear Nov. 3, after the Illinois
game and the second will be pub-
lished Nov. 10 following the con-
clusion of the Navy game.
Adoption of thenew plans marks
a change in policy from former
years when it was customary for
The Daily to publish an extra after
virtually every important game. It
has been brought about largely be-
cause everyone interested in the
Michigan game sees it when it is
played here or else follows it play
by play by means of radio or grid-
graph when it is played away from
home.
PLAN TO TAKE ACTION
ON BURTON CAMPANILE

Representatives Of All Classes
University Under Burton
Sponsor Plan
GLASSES TO MEET NOV.

In
2

Definite action on the proposed
Burton Memorial Campanile seems
assured with the announcement by
Paul N. Young, '25E, chairman of
the committee representing the
class of '25E which is sponsoring
the project, that a meeting of rep-
resentatives of all classes attending
the university during the regime of
President Burton, has been called
for Friday evening, Nov. 2, in Ann
Arbor.
The meeting, according to Mr.
Young's letter to the Alumni office,
has been arranged by E. J. Ot-
toway, president of the Alumni
Association to consider the respec-
tive merits of carillons or chimes
to be installed in the Campanile'
which is to be built by the Uni-
versity of Michigan club of Ann
Arbor. Although, thus far, no
name has been selected definitely
for the structure, that matter is also
to be settled at the meeting which
will include representatives from
all classes graduated between 1921
and 1927, inclusive.
Mr. Young as representative of
the class of '25E is trying to inter-
est the other classes in getting suf-
ficient funds to install either caril-
lons or chimes in the building
which will probably be built in the
Mall. ,
ALUM-NI BOARD MEET
An invitation has already been
extended to the fifty-four living
ex-members of the Executive Board
of the University of Michigan
Alumni Association to be the guests
of the present board at its regular
fall meeting Friday, Nov. 2.
Although many of the past boardl
members are located a great dis-
tance from Ann Arbor, a majority
of those invited are expected to at-
tend, according to '. Hawley Tap-
Sping, Field Secretary of the Associ-
Iation.
Most of the visitors will attend
the Illinois-Michigan football game
on the following afternoon. A Big
Ten football game is one of the
usual features of the fall meeting.
The Executive Board meets three
times a year, in March, June, and
in the fall.

NEW SPORTS BUILDING
TO BE COMPLETED BY
FIRST OFNEXT WEEK
SWIMMING POOL TO BE ONLY
FACILITY NOT READY
FOR USE
TO BE FIRSTOF ITS KIND
All Students of University College
Will Take Physical Training
For Two Years
Michigan's latest addition to its
athletic equipment-the Intra-
mural building-will be ready for
use with the exception of the
swimming pool, at the beginning
of next week, according to the con-
tractors.
This building, erected at a cost
of apprximately $750,000, and lo-
cated at the northside of Ferry
Field, is the first of its type to be
built in this country. Except for
the swimming pool it will be de-
voted entirely to intramural athle-
tics, that is, there will be no inter-
collegiate events or practice held
within the building. ,
Arrangements whereby the male
students on the campus may use
the equipment in the new building
are now being developed by Field-
ing H. Yost, director of Michigan
athletics, and Elmer D. Mitchell,
director of the Intramural depart-
ment. They will be announced in
the near future.
Offers Wider Scope
The new building will give great-
er scope to the intramural program
and will allow a greater participa-
tion on the part of male stdents.
It will make practical a two-year
required course in physical train-
ing for all undergraduate students
instead of the one-year course now
in force. Sanction for this course
has already been given by the Re-
gents.
In addition, it will facilitate the
organization and work of the regu-
lar Summer schol for coaches,
given annually by the Department;
of Physical Education. In the past,
it has been necessary to divide the
work between Ferry Field and
Yost Field House, and the campus,
which has made the scheduling of
classes extremely difficlt. In the
future, the two buildings which
will serve as laboratories in this
course will be only a few hundred
yards apart.
To House Officers
Officers of the intramural de-
partment will be housed in the new
structure. A swimming pool, 75x35
feet, will a gallery seating, 2,000
feet is one of the features of the
building. There will also be a
large gymnasium, 252x107 feet in
size, 13 walled handball courts,
each 20x40 feet, 13 squash courts,
18/2x32 feet, a wrestling room 52
feet square, and an auxihary gym-
nasium, mainly for faculty, 95x45
feet in size.
On the main gymnasium floor
there will be marked both basket-
ball and tennis courts. At present
there are 2,000 lockers in the build-
ing, with room available for 2,000
more. The building itself, measures
420x110 feet. It has been construc-
ted narrow in width to allow better
lighting and ventilation.

COAST DISTRESS
IS ON INCREASE
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28- Re-
ports which have reached Presi-
dent Coolidge lately from Florida
are to the effect that distress aris-
ing from the recent hurricane is
on the increase, necessitating a
further appeal from him to the
country to contribute to the Red
Cross Relief Fund.
The President will not issue a
furtheri formal appeal but will sat-
isfy himself with bringing condi-
tions in Florida to the attention of
the American public relying upon
the generosity to supply the. funds
needed tq reach the situation.
A. A. D. Rahn of Minneapolis,
who went to the devastated area
as the representative of the Shrin-
ers, on his way back, informed
President Coolidge that the loss of
life and conditions generally were
infinitely worse than could be
visualized by written account.
President Coolidge as a result of
Rahn and other descriptions of the
disaster, feels that immediate re-
lief of far wider scope than has yet
been given is imperative.
WGHP TO BROADCAST
'FIRST RADIO PROGA
Opening Program Of Current Year
Will Be Radiocast Here'
Tuesday Night
IS FOURTH ANNUAL SERIES
"Michigan Night" will again be
held when the first of the series of
25 radio programs arranged for the
present college year will be broad-
cast at 8 o'clock next Tuesday
night, October 2, over WGHP, De-
troit, the station of the George
Harrison Phelps Advertising Coun-
sel.
The series will be ushered into
the air by the Varsity band play-
ing the Victors. During the pro-
gram popular Michigan football
song will be broadcast, including
Varsity, the Stadium March, Men
of the Maize and Blue, and the
Yellow and the Blue. This year
more attention will be given to
typically college music and it is
planned that the musical pro-
grams be alternated: that is, the
odd selection will be presented by
such college organizations as the
glee club. Varsity band, or the
Union dance orchestra. The even
selections will be offered by mem-
bers of the faculty of the School
of Music.
As was the case last year, the
programs will consist of four five-
minute speeches by members of the
faculty with the musical numbers
alternated. The speakers on the
opening program will be, Shirley'
W. Smith, secretary of the Uni-
versity, Prof. Fielding H. Yost, di-+
rector of intercollegiate athletics,
Prof. K. Pollock, of the political sci-
ence department, and Prof. George
G. Brown, of the chemistry depart-
ment.
Michigan Night programs will be
broadcast every Tuesday night over
WGHP between the hours of eight
and nine, from the Michigan cam-
pus. The fall season of 1928 marks
the fourth year of the University
broadcasting. In 1925 programs
were transmitted by the co-opera-
tion WCX and WJR, while WWJ
has handled the programs for the
past two years. Prof. Waldo J.
Abbot, of the rhetoric department,
will again arrange the programs
and will announce from the local
station.

UNION REGISTRATION
Michigan men who because
of afternoon classes or other
reasons have been unable to.
register at the Union will be
given an opportunity between
11 and 12 o'clock on Monday
morning and between 10 and
j 12 o'clock on Tuesday and
I Thursday morning, it was an- f
I nounced yesterday. Registra-
tion will be in the student of-
I fices on the third floor of the
I Union building.j
INDIANAPOLIS DEFEATED
IN SECONDSERIES TILT
(By Associated Press)
ROCHESTER, N. Y., Sept. 28.-
Rochester evened up the Little
World Series yesterday by defeat-
ing Indianapolis, 10 to 5. The In-
a - 1.,~A- - - 1- -V -4-4-11 - .. 4 -

NEW YORK AMERICANS
TAKE THIRD PENNANT
BYDFAIGTIGERS
ATHLETICS ELIMINATED AFTER
EXCITING THREE WEEKS;
OF COMPETITION
RUTH HITS HOME RUN
Pipgrass Turns in Pennant Winning
Victory as Four Pitchers
Oppose Yankees
(By Associated Press)
DETROIT, Sept. 28.-The Yank-
ees clinched this sixth American
League Pennant, their third in suc-
cession, by defeating the Tigers to-
day 11 to 6 in the third game of
the series. The Athletics won from
Chicago, 7 to 5, but the Yankees
retained a lead of two and one!
half games, with only two more to
be played by each of the con-
tenders.
George Williams Pipgrass, a lead-
ing cog in the Yankee remnants
of a pitching staff, but a failure
until today on this trip west, turned
in the flag-winning victory. The
Tigers trodded him hard but he
had a good lead from the start.
Gibson, Stoner, Smith, and Page
failed to stop the Yanks.
Babe Ruth hit his 53rd home
run in the eighth inning with
Koenig on base. Page was in the
box for Detroit. Only a landslide
now could give the Babe enough
homers in .his two remaining games
for seven to tie his major league
record of 60 set last year but he
may possibly make two more to
make 1928 his third best season.
Won First in 1921
The Yankees first won the Amer-
ican League championship in 1921,
and proceeded to reel off three in
a row. But after a second place
finish in 1924 and after a dip to
seventh in 1925;.the club regained
the top in 1926 for the start of
its second run of three by winning
six flags, the Yankees moved to a
tie with the Athletics and the Red
Box, each of whom took six in
their palmy days.
The winning campaign of the
Yankees falls naturally into three
divisions. Through the first two
months they were invincible, win-
ning thirty-five and losing only
eight for a percentage of .830. Ex-
perts were likening them to the
famous Cubs, who won 106 games
in 1906; and wondered how badly
the champions would shatter that
mark. Some estimates ran in size
as high as 25 games. They were
thankful today to win the 100th.
Champions Slip
Then came the awakening. The
Yanks stumbled along at a gait of
about .550 for the next six weeks,
but the Athletics did little better.'
Even while, they were skidding the
champions retained their strange
power to deceive the Athletics
when and where they willed, A
double win over the Macks at the
Rupert Studium on July 1 gave Mil-
ler Huggins an advantage of thir-
teen and one-half games.
Next came the closing phase of
the Yankee battle-the long war of
attrition in which the Yankees
fought not so much to win as to
keep from losing. The Athletics
started on her way up and finally
did dislodge the champion by half
a game on Saturday, September 8.
Barring a few days early in the
last three campaigns, it was the
first time the Yankees had been
out of the lead in three seasons.
The Mackmen moved confidently
into ~he Yankee stadium for battles
in three' playing days, but found

the Yankees still possessed of their
knack of winning from Philadel-
phia when no other team would
(Continued on Page Six)

NAVAL TREATY
REFUSED BY U. S.
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28.-Lon-
don and Paris were officially. ad-
vised tonight that the 'ranco-
British naval limitations agree-
ment was wholly unacceptable to
the United States.
The American note characteized
the cruisers and submarines re-
strictions proposals as "even, more
objectionable" than the siilar
plan offered by the British dele-
gation at the three-power nval
conference in Geneva.-
Washington has again declined
frankly to accept any distinction
from limitation purposes between
eight-inch and six-inch gin crti-
sers or between submarines aboe
and below 600 tons in size.
Stating the reason for this blunt
rejection of the accord'theory :of°
cruiser limitations, the note said it
was "clearly apparent that limita-
tion of this type only would add
enormously to be comparative of-
fensive power of the nation posses-
sing a large merchant tonnage on
which preparation could be made
in time on peace for mounting six-
inch guns."
As to submarines, it said, the
United States "would gladly, in
world, abolish submarines alto-
gether."
DIXON WILL BE FIRST
ON LECTURPR ORAM,
To Speak on "Birds and Mammals
Of Mount McKinley
National Park"
IS EXPERTMAMMALOGIST
Dr. Joseph S. Dixon, of' the
Museum of Vertebrate Zoology,
University of California, will lec-
ture Tuesday, October 2, on "Birds
and Mammals of Mount McKinley
National Park," thus opening -the
program of university lectures that
will be given here throughout the
year. The lecture will be held. in
the Natural Science auditorium 4
4:15 p. m., Tuesday afternoon and
will be illustrated with lantern
slides.
An expert mammalogist and or-
nithologist, Dr. Dixon has been a
leader on Pacific coast and Alas-
kan explorations for many years,
and was the first man to discover
the nesting haunts of the surf bird,
which spends most of its life at
sea, but breeds on the alpine slopes
of high mountains.
One of Dr. Dixon's special studies
is the food habits Of predatory
mammals. By the most careful
scientific investigations he has
proven that in California, the lynx
and other species commonly Con-
sidered extremely harmful are of
decided economic value. These
studies are revising the scientific
attitude toward the whole tribe of
predacious animals and will thus
tends toward the preservation of
some valuable species, including
many fur-bearers, that have been
heretofore considered as detrimen-
tal to man's interest.
Recently, Dr. Dixon hasdbeen
studying the food habits of deer in
the Yosemite Valley so that they
can be' correlated with those of
domestic stock and lead to the con-
servation of natural grazing lands
in the western forests.
The lecture which will have an
important bearing on forestry and
range problems, will be open to the
general public.
THE WEATHER

(By Associated Press) -
Mostly cloudy Saturday and Sun-
day; local showers; rising temper-
ature.

MANAGERS SWITCH SITE
MADISON SQUARE
FOR TALK
PLAN BIG DEMONSTRAT

Chahge ldade To Avoid Conflict In
Schedule Of Presidential
Candidates
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Sept. 28.-Her-
bert Hoover will speak in New York
City, in the home town of his
Denocratc opponent on October
13 Instead , of October 17, the
change to date being made so that
he could obtain Madison Square
Garden with its quadruple seating
capacity over Carnegie Hall.
The change was made today
after the Senator George H.
Moses of. New Hampshire, chair-
man of the eastern campaign ad-
ivsory committee, had reported
that ' the advance demand for
tickets for the New York speech
was so great that the Carnegie Hall
would not afford sufficient space
to accommodate the crowd.
Old Building Inadequate
At the Hoover general headquar-
ters itWgas said that the 5,000 odd
seats in Carnegie Hall would have
been' fIled withHoover workers
from 'the various precincts in
Wdiitei 'New York and for that
reason the decision was made to
hold the meeting in Madison
Square Garden, which has a seat-
gig capacity of aproximately 20,-
O60and is one of the largest halls
ii the .country.
'The meeting probably will start
at ,8 o'clock, Eastern Standard
Tiine, and will be sponsored by the
TUnion League,. -the Women's Na-
tional Republican, the Young
Mews epublican and the Republi-
can 1'sne8smen's Club, in con-
tunrtIonWith the New York party,
state and conty committees. The
speech of the Republican presiden-
tial candiate will be broadcast
over . ,ation-Wide radio hook-up.
Ioover to Leave Oct. 12
While final, plans will not be
cotpleted until next week, Hoover
probably "ill. leave here at mid-
nlght on Qtober 12, spending all
of the next day in New York. This
1ill give him opportunity to con-
fer with leaders in both the met-
topolitan districts and in some 'of
the New England states.
13y nioving up the date of this
speech, the Republican nominee
also will avoid a conflict with a
speaking date of Gov. Alfred E.
Sinith, who is to deliver an address
at Chicago on the night originally
chosen by .the Hoover managers for
the INew . York meeting.
The change in schedule will put
added pressure upon Hoover as it
will leave him only a few days after
his Elizabethen, Tenn., speech, one
week from tomorrow, in which to
prepare his New York address, the
subfedt matter of which has not
yet been chosen. The general ex-
pbetation now is that the nominee
will deal in part at least with gen-
eral business conditions.
To Set Boston Date Later
While the date of the Boston ad-
dress still is to be fixed, some pres-
sure is being brought to bear
Hoover to make that speech within
a week after the New York meet-
ing. His previous plans had been
to deliver this speech sometime be-
tween October 23 and October 25,
this giving him several days leeway
between the -address and time for
him to start his long journey across
the-continent to vote. No decision
yet. has been reached as to what
he will make the theme of this ad-
dress.
The candidate had few visitors
today and spent virtually the en-
tire day in working on the final
draft of the speech he will make
at Elizabethan.
'There was considerable interest
in political circles as the result of
an announcement during the day
that President Coolidge planned to
send a mes age tomorrow to the
Massachusetts state convention.
The chief executive was reported

as willing to add the influence of a
message from him to the party, na-
tional and state ticket cause.

HOOVER TO ADDRlESS
NHEW YORK AUDIENCE
SHIFTS SPEECH D ATE

TO

ION

_,.
,;
:, .''

SENA TOR
DESIRES

CURTIS
DEFENSE,

(By Associated Press)
LAWTON, Okla., 'Sept. 28.-
Close by one of the nation's mili-
tary posts, Fort Sill, Senator Cur-
tis, the Republican vice presiden-
tial nominee, tonight advocatedj
military defense of "sufficient{
strength" to ward off attacks and
to support the world's efforts for
peace.

FLOOD CONTROL AUTIHORITIES GAIN.
CONTROL OF CAMPUS WATER SPOUTj

'SIMBA,' PICTURE OF ANIMAL LIFE
IN AFRICA, WILL BE SHOWN HERE

By Gumley
Yesterday morning the precocial
drinking fountain at the State St.
end of the diagonal was success-
fully squelched by the B & G boys,
and once again it resembles a
drinking fountain and not an oil!
gusher.
Not even Briggs knows what a
drinking fountain thinks about and
tnere is no authority on the eccen-
tricities of these thirst-quenching
apparati, but it is safe to assume
that they have their moments the
same as the rest of us.
Gurgling calmly on from day to
day, they must often feel the -urge
to strive for bigger things; to feel
the desire to get into the public

The anatomy of a drinking foun-
tain is well known. It consists
merely of a pipe through which
water is pumped at a fairly high
rate of speed-a flow which is gov-
erned by a cap at the business end
of the pipe. No anti-toxin has been
found, however, that will prevent
a fountain from stepping out once
in a while and painting the town.
or part of it, with water.
The only advice that can be given
to the one or two students who
have actually been seen drinking
the vile substance that bubbles
forth from these insidious foun-
tains is this: approach the foun-
tain carefully but deliberately, look
it straight in the eye, drink quick-
ly-and then run.

"Simba," a new motion picture
which is soon to play at Whitney in
Ann Arbor, is a picture of jungle
life in the heart of wildest Africa.
The movie was made by Mr. and
Mrs. Martin Johnson, African ex-
plorers and "camera-hunters," who
spent four years in Africa in the
filming of the picture.
The leading man is the camera-
man, or Johnson, himself, who is
behind the picture rather than in
it most of the time. Mrs. John-
son can most nearly be called the
heroine, although sha co-stars
with lions, elephants, rhinos and
innumerable other members of the
jungle cast.

Which accompanied them, as mere-
ly animals like thmeselves and be-
trayed no fright or animosity to-
ward them.
The film, "Simba," is endorsed
by Pres. Clarence Cook Little and
by members of the staff of the
Museum of Zoology because it was
made wholly in Africa and is a
true picture of wild life in Africa.
Many so-called wild-life films are
made at least in part in zoological
gardens or with domesticated or
semi-domesticated wild animals.
The making of "Simba" was part
of the devolpment of the Great
African Hall at the American Mu-
seum, conceived and designed by
the late Carl Akelev as a true re-

SMITH TO LEAVE
ON SCHOOL TOUR
Ira M. Smith, Registrar of the
university, leaves today for a tour
nf high ,shnn ofth? t'a m.-

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