100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 18, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ESTABLISHED
1890

Ait

I a1133

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I

VOL. XXXIX, No. 49

PART 1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1928

EIGHT

ST

TE

HOLDS

RSI ,

TO

FIELD

G o

YALE EDUCATOR
SWLL OPEN FALL,
SERICES TODAY
PRtOF. PHELPS IS AUTHORITY
ON SHAKESPEARE AND
WRITER OF NOTE
FRANTZ TO 'BE AT ORGAN
Rev. J. T. Stone, Chicago Minister,
And 'Henry Pitt VanDusen To
Speak Lateri
.William Lyon Phelps will ad-
dress the opening convocation of
the fall series at 11 o'clock this
morning in Hill auditorium. Pro-
fessor Phelps has appeared in Ann,
Arbor before as a convocations
speaker, having been chosen by the
Student council to open the fall
series last year..
As a lecturer, authority on
Shakespeare and drama, patron of
the theater, and author of num-
erous works, Professor Phelps has
long been known to the public.
Among the volumes of his author-
ship are literary essays, biography,
accounts of polar exploration, text
books, and religious and theatrical
treatments.
He received his A.B. from Yale in
1887, took his Ph.D. there in 1891,
receiving an -A.M. from Harvard
the same year, and received honor-
ary degrees of Litt. D. from Brown
UniVaersity and Colgate University
In 1921.
Has Won New Laurels
Since addressing the opening
CZXation last, fall,: Prof essor
y heips has von new laurels, or
perhaps fame, through his friend-
ship with James Joseph Tunney,
retired heavyweight champion and
peruser of literature. Last spring
before the champion retired and
married, Phelps invited him to ad-
dress his lecture section in Shake-
speare. The burly marine accept-
ed, and delivered himself of some
reflections on the bard before a
New Haven classroom in which
standing room was at a premium.
Dailes Frantz will be at the new
Frieze memorial organ, and a visit-
ing soloist from Detroit will sing
the offertory. The congregation
will be asked to join in singing two
hymns, "Dear Lord and Father of
Mankind," and "O God, Our Help
in Ages Past." The pelude and
postlude will be played by Frantz,
according to Lois Tilley, '29, who is
in charge of convocations music.
'Efforts to secure Senator Arthur
H. Vandenberg, Grand Rapids edi-
tor, to address a convocation on
Dec. 2 have been unsuccessful, ac-
cording to Mark Andrews, '29,
chairman of the Student council
committee on convocations. There
will be no convocation on that
date.
Stone To Give Address
The Reverend John Timothy
Stone, prominent Presbyterian pas-
tor of Chicago, will address the
second convocation of the series
on Sunday, Dec. 9. He is an author
of note, recipient of many degrees,
and a past moderator of the gen-
eral assembly of the Presbyterian
church, in which post he followed
the Reverend Charles Gilkey of
Chicago, who addr~essed a convoca-
tion last year. j
The final convocation of the fall
series will be addressed by Henry
Pitt VanDusen of Union Theolog-
ical Seminary, on Dec. 16. Several
previous efforts have been made to
secure VanDusen to address con-

vocations, but it has never been
possible to arrange a date, al-
though he is known to Ann Arbor
as a visiting preacher at St. An-
,drew's Episcopal church.
Rocknemen Crushed
By Carnegie Attack
(By Associated Press)
SOUTH BEND, Ind., Nov. 17.-
Carnegie Tech routed Notre Dame,
27 to 7, today before 28,000 rain-
soaked fans and continued its un-

FORCEFUL GALE
SWEEPS EUROPE
(By Associated Press)
LONDON, Nov. 17.-The terriffic
gale which has swept Western
Europe for two days, was raging
over the continent tonight with a
known death tool of 39 and with
12 other persons missing in its path
of destruction. England was en-
joying a lull in the wind storm, but
the North Sea countries still were
bearing its full force.
Of the three deaths reported on
the continent, one occured in Ant-
werp, one in Coblenz and one at
Bethune, France. A family of 12
was given up as lost at Amsterdam
when a report was received that
the wreck of their boat had been
seen in the Zuyder Zee.
Nineteen persons were killed in
England, either by wreckage torn
loose by the wind, or by stumbling
in front of vehicles while bucking
the storm with heads down. Seven-
teen were drowned at Rye when a
lifeboat capsized. Telephone, tele-
graph and train service was de-
moralized. Channel steamers last
night required from eight to 13
hours for a voyage normally made
in less than two.
The gale ravaged the coast of
Denmark and several small craft
were reported sunk. Ferry service
with Germany was suspended.
NOTED AUTHOR PLANS.
TO GIVE SPEECH HERE
Lewis Browne, Writer Of Fiction
And Biographies, Will Talk
On November 21
IS STUDENTOF RELIGIONl

IBADGERS CR SH
BI1G TENTEAMS
HAWKEYES LOSE FIRST GAME
OF SEASON ON MUDDY
FIELD, 13-0
LUSBY MAKES LONG RUN
Wisconsin, Tied But Unbeaten,
Must Win From Minnesota
To Clinch Championship
(By Associated Press)
IOWA CITY, Iowa, Nov. 17.-A
courageous Wisconsin eleven is,
within reach of its first Western
Conference gridiron championship,
in 16 years.
In a cold downpour of rain, min-
gled with flurries of snow, the
Badgers, tied but still undefeated,
conquered the hitherto unbeaten1
Iowa team, 13 to 0, today in the
slush, water and mire of a gridiron
that resembled a puddle of mud.
A c h e e r i n g, pulse-throbbing
crowd of 30,000, sat through the
rain to see these two undefeated
teams fight it out in a struggle for
what virtually ammounted to
championship honors. The Bad-
gers, now leadingthe race, must
conquer their '1aditional enemy.
Minnesota, in the final game of the
season a week hence to establish
themselves as the unchallenged
{ 1928 champions of the Big Ten.
Is Punting Battle
The game was a cagey struggle
from start to finish, with both
teams punting almost continuously
in the hopes that a break would
[ come, as a consistent running or

Lewis Browne, noted historian forward passing attack was almost
and author of "Stranger Than Fic- impossible because of wretched
tion," "This Believing World," and conditions. For two periods the
"That Man Heine," will make his teams battled on even terms with
third appearance in Ann Arbor in the Hawkeyes putinghup a heroic
as many years, when he speaks in defense, especially when they re-
Natural Science auditorium, Wed- sisted the battering Badgers a yard
nesday, November 21, at 8 o'clock, from the goal at the start of the
under the uspices of the Hillel second period.
Foundation. Wisconsin's first touchdown
Although known to the public came soonafter the start of the
mostly for his fiction, Mr. Browne third period, when Lusby galloped
is fast being recognized as one of away on a 63-yard run after grab-
the foremost historians of the age, bing a punt booted by Mayes Mc-
mostly because of a new style off Lain, the giant Cherokee Indian
mosty bcaue o a ew tyl ofplaying fullback for the Hawkeyes
historical writing which he intro- ly ing o wkeys
duced .in his first great book, Lusby, standing on Wisconsin y
"Stranger Than Fiction," in 'which 37-yard line, fumbled the slippery
he portrays in interesting style the oval. The Wisconsin halfback
history of the Jewish race. snapped it up and started off on
Not yet thirty years old, Mr. his long sprint, which ended in a
Bonethineerteyes'omr.slide over the goal line in a splash
Browne has nevertheless become of water and mud. Lusby and
the widest read person in this Behr dropped back to place kick.
ountr eon the sujT sof compa- 1ut instead Behr grabbed the ball
World," one of his recent efforts, He was brought down on the
sold 20,000 copies during the first three-yard line, however.
four weeks after publication and ist
still considered a best seller. The Slipping Ball Causes Score
Literary Guild recognized the merits Failure of Iowa to handle the
of his writings in choosing his slippery ball resulted in the second
"That Man Heine" as one of the Badger touchdown late in the
years most distinguished biog- fourth period. Iowa got the ball
raphical production. Mr. Browne's on its 13-yard line after Wisconsin
latest work, "The Graphic Bible," failed to make downs. Oran Pape.
a unique history of the Bible with blonde Iowa speedboy, who had been
maps and explanatory notes, has going into the game at intervals.
just come off the presses and is on ripped off nine yards through
sale in Ann Arbor book stores. tackle but the Hawkeyes drew a 15-
Starting as a rabbi in a small yard penalty, shoving the ball back
Connecticut town where he was to their seven-yard line.
forced to resign because he spon- McLain, standing behind his own
sored a radical speech, Mr. Browne goal line, in a punting position:
moved to Newark and later became signalled for the ball, but started
one of Rabbi Stephen S. Wise's to run. He fumbled and the ball
chief associates, during which time hit the ground a foot behind the
he traveled extensively in Europe Iowa goal. Casey, a substitute
and the Orient, and wrote articles Wisconsin end, pounced on it for
for the Nation, The New Republic a touchdown. Rebholz, Badger
and other well known American fullback, place-kicked for the
publications. extra point.
PAST YEAR SEES MANY VALUABLE
GIFTS PRESENTED TO UNIVERSITY

FRESHMEN WILL
SELECT CAPTAIN
Selection of a captain to lead the
class of 1932 in the Fall games
which take place next Saturday,
and preliminary organization of
that class for the annual battle
with the sophomores, will mark the
work of a freshman pep meeting
to be held at 7:15 o'clock Wednes-
day night in the ball room of the
Union.
Carl Brandt or the speech depart-
ment, will deliver the principal ad-
dress of the evening. Ernie Mc-
Coy, '29, varsity basketball captain,
will also address the first year men.
Robert Warren, '29, will represent
the Student council at the meeting
and will explain the rules of the
contests. Jackson Wilcox, '30,
chairman of the underclass com-
mittee of the Union will preside at
the meeting. Smokes and enter-1
tainment will be provided by the
Union.
STANFORD WINS GAME
AS HOOVERLQS O
Southerner Assures President-Elect
Of Continued Confidence
From Solid South
TO LEAVE FOR TOUR SOON
(By Associated Press)
STANFORD UNIVERSITY, Cal.,
Nov. 17.-On the eve of his depar-
ture from his home for his good-
will tour of South America, Herbert
Hoover yielded again to the lure of
college memories today while he
watched the football team of his
alma mater battle the. eleven of
the University of Washington, and
win, 12-0.
After a morning spent clearing
away correspondence, the Presi-
dent-elect and Mrs. Hoover drove
to the stadium.
John L. Lucey of Dallas, Texas,
president of the Associated Hoover
clubs of Texas, said, after a visit
with-the President-elect, that "the
break in th solid South is per-
manent if Mr. Hoover meets the
wishes of the south, and I am con-
fident that he will."
Details of Hoover's trip, a formal
statement of the Hoover home said,
would not be made public until
after Mr. Hoover has conferred
with Ambassador Henry P: Fletcher
on the battleship Maryland. Pass-
ports for the .party were issued
during the day by W. A. Newcomb,
in San Francisco, under a special
order of the state department, and
later were to be visaed by the
counsels of the various countries.
The party will leave Palo Alto at
7:30 o'clock tomqrrow night for
the journey down the Californa
coast to San Pedro, arriving at the
port for Los Angeles at 9:45 o'clock
Monday morning.
Chicago Loses F i n a 1
Game Of Poor Season
(By Associated Press)
C H I C A G O, Nov. 17.-Chicago
ended its football season today
without winning a Big Ten Con-
ference game, falling before the
onslaught of the 1927 champions,
Illinois, 40-0.
It was an ideal setting to end
such a disastrous season, rain fall-
ing during most of the game on an
already soggy gridiron. The Illini,
however, were mud runners, piling
up six touchdowns, with Frosty
Peters, Douglas Mills and Walker

leading the barrage.
Mills supplied the big thrill of
the afternoon when he dashed 75
yards through the entire Chicago
team for his touchdown. Peters
opened the attack in the first
period, dashing almost 50 yards for
the first score. sHe added two
other touchdowns and Walker
scored two, one after racing25
yards following a pass of 20 yards
from Peters.0

H1HEARSOFFICERS
IN SHIPINQUIRYI
WATER POURING INTO HATCHES
NOT BELIEVED FATAL
QUIZ REVEALS
SHIP OFFICER TESTIFIES
Challenges Accuracy Of Radio Re-
ports As Harrowing Disaster
Is Told In Detail
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Nov. 17-Sea waters
poured into the steamer Vestris
through leaky ports and hatches
for a day and a half before the
ship sank, the two senior surviv-
ing officers testified today, but al-
most until the very end they
thought she would be saved.
The only witnessess at today's
session of the federal inquiry into
thq disaster, which cost .more than
100 lives, were First Officer Frank
Johnson, a wind-bitten little mari-
ner who was making his first trip
as second in command, and the
burly chef engineer, James Adams.
Johnson flatly contradicted the
previous testimony of two wireless
men from the Vestris and even
took exceptions to the accuracy of
the last wireless report about the
sinking ship sent by Captain Wil-
liam J. Carey, who went down with
his ill-fated command.
Adams Tells of Report
Adams told of reporting to the
captain at 11 o'clock Monday
morning, an hour before the SOS
had been sent out, that he be-
lieved that h could keep the shi
afloat indefinitely although at that
time it had been lying almost on
its side for hours and was steadily
filling with water.
Johnson was produced at the
federal building by officials of the
Lamport and Holt lines at request
of United States Attorney Tuttle
who is conducting the investiga-
tion, after department of justice
agents had sought him for twc
days.
He told of being appointed sec-
ond in command just before th
Vestris sailed, and acknowledged
that part of such an officer's duty
was to see to proper securing of
coal and cargo ports.
"What did you do about the
closing of the coal port?" Tuttle
asked.
"I told the ship's passengers tc
close them," he said.
Never Inspected Ports
Tuttle then brought out through
questioning that the first officer
had never inspected these ports
because "There has never been any
trouble with them."
The first officer said the first
discovery that anything was wrong
was made Sunday night at 7
o'clock. Tuttle reminded him that
two wireless men from the ship had
testified to their having been a
definite list long before that, as
early as midnight Saturday.
"They were wrong," said John-

GUILD WILL GIVE
NEW YORK PL A Y
"The Second Man," S. N. Behr-
man's Broadway success, will be
presented tomorrow night at 8:30
at the Whitney theater by the
New York Theater Guild repertory
company.
The play is the second of a series
of four plays which are being pre-
sented within the month by that
group of players. Among those
taking prominent parts in the pre-
sentation are Elizabeth Risdon, Peg
Entwistle, Robert Keith, and Neal
Caldwell. The same company isl
giving similar performances all
over the country.
SHERMAN WILL PLAY
AT SORORITY AFFAIR
Plans For Sixth Pan-Hellenic Dance
Are Nearing Completion,
Chairman Announces

BIDS ARE SELLING FAST
Maurie Sherman will lead his or-
hestra in person on the night of
the Pan-Hellenic ball, according to
word received from Chicago yes-
terday. The Sherman orchestra,
one of the best known musical or-
ganizations in the cotintry, has
been under contract for the affair
for more than a month, though it
was uncertain until yesterday that
3herman himself would be able to
lead it.
Other arangements for the sixth
annual women's party, to be held
on November 30, in the Union ball-
room, are nearing completion, ac-
ording to an announcement made
yesterday by the chairman. 'The
number of tickets to be sold for
the event has been increased from
200 to 250 because of the exception-
al demand, and only a small num-
ber of the extra allotment remain
unsold. Those tickets still remain-
ing may be secured from Janet
Calvert, 7817, chairman of the
ticket committee. The extra allot-
ment is made possible by an ar-
rangement by the committee
Nhereby two small rooms at the
Union will be opened into the ball-
room for the purposes of the party.
Sherman's orchestra, which will
furnish music for the affair, is the
'ighest priced organization ever
brought to a Pan-Hellenic ball, and
-ne of the highest priced ever to
appear here. The organization is
regularly engaged at the College
Inn in Chicago, and through its
broadcasting engagements, phono-
graph recording, and theatrical
tours has become nationally known.
Indiana Takes Game

FROM S.PARTANS
IN CLOSE 'GAME
KICK BY HUGHES GIVES 3-0
VICTORY OVER M. S. C.
GRIDMEN
STEADY RAINMARS GAME
Geistert Is Maize And Blue Running
Star; Makes Several.Good
Gains On End Plays
By Morris Quinn
Michigan registered her second
victory of the season, 3-0, yester-
day afternoon at the expense of a
traditional rival, Michigan State
college, in a game that was marked
by stellar defensive play on the
part of both elevens but lacking,
except in two or three instances,
in the usual thrills of a closely con-
tested battle. Approximately 30,-
000 fans witnesssed the tilt, the last
two periods of which were played
in a steady rain.
Twice during the first period the
powerful Michigan line held for
downs within the shadowofdtheir
own goal after successful Spartan
passes, and then the Wolverines
.camesback strong in the second
quarter to tally the only points of
the game.
Truskowski completed a 33-yard
toss to Wheeler, and then the lat-
ter took a lateral pass from Cap-
tain Rich and ran to State's 11-
yard mark. Hughes replaced Hozer
in the Michigan backfield and
scored a perfect field goal from
the 1-yard line.
Is Tribute To Kipke
Although the Wolverines downed
the Spartans, as has been their
custom every year since 1915, the
game will go down in the
annals of State grid history as one
of the greatest ever waged by a
Green and 'White team. It will
stand as a lasting tribute to the
ability of Harry Kipke, the new
Spartan head coach, who has de-
veloped a fighting aggregation that
checkeda Michigan offense, some-
thing that State teams had failed
to do in the three previous en-
counters.
The green-clad host clearly
demonstrated that they had been
'pointed' for the traditional en-
0 o
I CONFERENCE STANDINGS I

MICHIGAN WIN

W.
Wisconsin .. .3
Iowa ...........3
Ohio State......3
Illinois........3
Minnesota ......3
Northwestern .... 2
Indiana .........2
Purdue.........1
Michigan ........1
Chicago ..........0

L. T. Pct.

0
1
1
2
3
3
2
3
5

1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0

1(

son.
Johnson said that Sunday eve-
ning the ship lurched heavily and
he was at once informed that a
bulkkhead had broken down and
and cargo had gone through to
the forecastle. He inspected. and
said he found that a "half-door"
near the bulkhead, a hinged open-
ing in the side of the ship slightly
larger than the coal port and
about the same distance from the
water, was leaking slightly.
Johnson said that the cargo that
went through the bulkhead weigh-
ed about 15 tons, but that the
shifting of this weight could not
make the ship list. He agreed
with Tuttle that water entering the
ship was responsible for the list
which increased during Sunday.
Princeton Is Victor
Over Battered Yale
(By Associated Press)
PRINCETON, N. J., Nov. 17.-The

From Northwestern
(By Associated Press)
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Nov. 17.-
Indiana's cripples snapped into ac-
tion today to win their second Con-a
ference game, nosing out the strong
Northwestern aggregation, 6 to 0.
Led by the sensational plunging
and running of Captain Chuck
Bennett, the Crimson outplayed the,
visitors in a driving rain.
The break that won the game1
came in the second period after
Holmer of Northwestern had punt-
ed outside the Indiana 28-yard line.
On the next play, Bennett slid off
the Purple left tackle, squirmed
past the secondary defense, and ran
72 yards for a touchdown.
FOOTBALL SCORES
Wisconsin 13; Iowa 0.
Minnesota, 52; Haskell, 0.
Michigan 3; Michigan State 0.
Indiana 6; Northwestern 0.
Ohio State 39; Muskingum 0.
Illinois 40; Chicago 0.
Purdue 14; Wabash 0.
Princeton 12; Yale 2.
N. Y. U. 27; Missouri 6.
Penn 34; Columbia 7.
Army 32; Carlton 7.
Dartmouth 28; Cornell 0.
Harvard 0; Holy Cross 0.
Lafayette 7; Penn State 0.
r N . n. ll ..... f

counter with the Wolverines, their
most important test each year.
While Michigan, on the otherhand,
displayed a noticeable let-down in
form that characterized her play
in the three previous games with
Wisconsin, Illinois, and Navy.
Statistics of the contest reveal
that the Wolverines out-gained the
invaders by rushing 111 yards to
74, but that the Kipkemen held the
edge in all of the other depart-
ments of play. The Spartans made
9 first downs to 7 for the Wolver-
ines; gained 60 yards by passing to
Michigan's 32; and outpunted the
winners 39 yards to 32 yards.
Defense Is Strong
Both teams showed to advantage
defensively, but neither could
muster a ground-gaining attack.
With the exception of half a dozen
instances the tilt resolved itself into
a punting duel between Grove of
State and Simrall, Holmes and Tot-
zke of Michiga , with each eleven
playing for a lucky break.
Rain began to fall at the open-
ing of the second half and the
backs were troubled considerably
throughout the last two periods by
the slippery condition of the ball,
Michigan especially being guilty of

.750
.750
.600
.400 I
.400 I
.333 I
.250 I
.000 I

Morethan $395,000 in gifts was
received by the University lastl
year, a recent checkup of the ac-
tions of the Board of Regents has
shown. This includes the actual
money given or pledged, and books,
apparatus, and other material'
items.I
This large sum is little more than
an estimate made by the Presi-

of $35,000 a year for three years,
or $105,000 inall, from a friend
who has requested that his name
be held confidential. This is to be
used in continuation of the Near
East research expedition, now ex-
cavating at Kom Aushim in Egypt
Another of the larger items is
represented by the remarkable
mycological library collected and

5
s

.

SENIORSj
Seniors who have not signed

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan