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November 11, 1928 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1928-11-11

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.4 9A

ANN .. dm ,- 4ir
jUat

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

- --- - ----------------

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 19281

EIGHT PAGES

TTLE

IDDIES

TO

TI

ti

BORAH ASKS FOR
TARIFF REVISION
(By Associated Press)

MCNAMEE WILL SPEAKI

1

In scoring its third win of the
season, Coach Courtwright's junior
varsity completely outplayed the
opposition in the second half, al-
hough Alma had. a slight edge on
te Maize and Blue reserves in the
first and second periods. The Wol-
verines made 12 first downs, 11 by
rushing, while their opponents ac-
Counted for nine. Widman and
Zarpp punted on virtually even
' e r m s, neither team gaining
through interchange of kicks.
Geistert's remarkabie running
was the outstanding performance
in the Michigan victory. Carrying ,
te brunt of the attack, the dimin- 1
utive quarterback smashed off tac-
kle and ran the ends for gain aft-
er gain. The way in which he kept
his feet on the sodden turf was
a marvel to the spectators, Alma
tacklers falling all around him as
he cut back and eluded the opposi-
tion on his various excursions
through the line.
Geistert Plays Well
In the second period Geistert be-
gan his afternoon's work by taking
the oval from his own 35-yard line
to the enemy 32-yard stripe. He
started on a wide run around his
own left end, skirted the sidelines
for 15 yards and cut back to dodge
the Alma secondary defense until
he was finally downed, after a 33-
yard gain. In the third quarter
he gave another beautiful exhibi-
tion of open field running when he
caught Karpp's punt on his own
45-yard line and ran through the
entire enemy team for Michigan's
second score.
The center of the Wolverine line
also be given credit for the manner
(Continued On Page Seven)
Purple Wins From
Boilermakers, 7-6
(By Associated Press)'
DYCHE STADIUM, EVANSTON,
Ill., Nov. 10.-Northwestern passed
its way to a second 1928 Western
Conference victory today, defeat-
ing Purdue, 7 to 6, on a field made
slow by rains of the past 24 hours.
-Captain Walt Holmer's advantage
over Pest Welch in cunning in the
opening quarter paved the way for
Northwestern's touchdown in the
first period. Taking the ball on the
13-yard line, Holmer carried it
across the goal line, then kicked
goal for what proved to be the
margin of victory.

Captain George Rich (above)
Alan Bovard (below)
Veteran Wolverines w io played a
prominent part in Michigan's 6-6
tie with the Navy yesterday. Cap-
tain Rich called signals for the
second consecutive game while'
Bovard returned to the lineup after
an absence caused by a shoulder
injury incurred in the Ohio State
game and was particularly bril-
liant in <defensive play.
CROWN HIROHITO NEW
EMPEROROFN IPPON
(By Associated Press)
KYOTO, Japan, Nov. 10-Empor-
or Hirohito tonight sat on the
throne held by his fathers in un-
broken succession since before the
dawn of written history. As the
first act of his reign after his f or-
mal rescript announcing himself
emporer he created three barons,
raised two viscounts to counts and
conferred the grand cordon of the
order of the chrysanthemum on
three other leading statesmen.
More modern and progressive
than any of his predecessors he
formally ascended the "high eld-
est seat" today with all the care-
fully preserved ritual of the ages.
Sitting under the phoenix crested
canopy, Hirohito asked the protec-
tion of the spiritof his ancestors
and the support of his beloved mil-
lion of subjects to discharge his sa-
cred duties in a manner not un-
worthy of the great past.
In honor of the coronation of His
Majesty, Hirohito, the 124th empor-
er of Japan, the University Nippon
club held a banquet last night at
the Haunted Tavern, following
which it was addressed by J. A.
Bursley, dean of students, and Ho-
mer Grafton, secretary of the Stu-
dent Christian association, who
spoke upon "Glimpses of Japan."

WASHINGTON, Nov. 10.-Sen-
ator Borah today advocated an
extra session of Congress for gen-
eral tariff revision. The senator
said that already there was need
of extra sessions to pass a farm
relief measure which he does not
believe can be passed at the com-
ing short session.
In urging that tariff revision he
regarded it as highly important in
view of party measures that some
relief through the readjustment of
agricultural schedules should be
given the farmers.
He said that it was his opinion
that should tariff revision be un-
dertaken it would be general in
character and could not be restric-
ted to the agricultural schedule.
HAWKEYEs BEAT OHIO
IN THRILLING BATTLE
Fullback Scores In Closing Minutes
Of Last Quarter To Win
Game, 14.-.7
1OWA LEADSCONFERENCE
(By Associated Press)
COLUMBUS, 0., Nov. 10.-In a
steel-gray setting, heaving with
low hanging clowds, mist, and,
finally, drizzling rain, Iowa, fight-
ing for Western Conference grid-
iron championship acclaim, down-
ed Ohio State, hitherto undefeated,
14 to 7, today in the last 60 seconds
of play.
The victory leaves Iowa at once
untied and undefeated in the title
race and ruins whatever cham-
pionship aspirations had been held
by the vanquished Buckeyes.
Behind the hounding feet of
Mayes McLain, churning Cherokee
fullback, the Iowans hammered
the Buckeye line to ripples in the
final period, and sent disconsola-
tion in the hearts of 47,000 loyal
Ohioans Who sat unmindful of the
drizzle, watching their heroes join
the ranks of other defeated teams.
With the score tied at 7 to 7, the
battering Hawkeyes opened up
with the winning touchdown on
their second attempt. By a master-
ful piece of strategy McLain, the
giant Indian smashed his way
across the Ohio goal, ploughing the
middle of the line when the be-
wildered Buckeyes were figuring on
Irving Nelson, the kicking spe-
cialist, of the Iowa eleven to try
for the winning point by booting a
drop kick.
Nelson, whose toe beat Minne-
sota two weeks ago, fell back into
position to drop kick. He was
rushed into the game an instant
before with the ball resting a foot
from Ohio's goal. As he opened
his arms, signalling for the ball to
be pushed to him, strategy that
won the game was brought into
play.
Instead of passing to Nelson, the
oval, went to the plowing. McLain.
Buckeyes take by surprise fell vic-
tims to his charge at the line and
he squirmed over for the winning
touchdown with a minute remain-
ing before the end of the game.

VARIED PROGRAM PROMISED
BY AMERICAN PREMIER
RADIO ANNOUNCER
TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE
Versatile Personality Of Speaker
Insures College Audience
Of Interesting Evening
As the second of the series ofJ
nine Oratorical association lecturesI
scheduled for the season of 1928-
1929, Graham McNamee, America's
premier radio announcer, will ap-
pear Wednesday night, Nov. 14, in
Hill auditorium, speaking on "Tell-
ing the World."
McNamee who broadcast the
Navy game has probably spoken to
more people than any other human
being in the world's history. The
familiar sound of his voice is
known from coast to coast. He is
a pioneer in the new profession of
broadcasting, and his familiar
"Graham M c N a m e e speaking,
please stand by" is now a byword

VIEWS INTERSECTIONAL CONT

EU

NAVY SCORES ON GANNON'S 78-YA
RUN; MICHIGAN EVENS COUNT
WITH BRILLIANT DRIVE

By Morris Quinn
BALTIMORE STADIUM, BALTIMORE, Md.,
I 0.-Approximately 40,000 grid fans, including 1,800 enthu
midshipmen watched the evenly matched Michigan and
teams battle through four thrilling quarters to a 6-6 tie this
noon in the big Baltimore Horseshoe Stadium.

Nov.
usiastic
Navy

i
t
I

Throughout the four periods it was a nip and tuck fight betwee
two elevens that were about equal in strength and each thirstin
for victory. Navy took the lead by scoring a touchdown aft
Johnny Gannon's sensational 64 yard return of Totzke's kicko
and a series of line plays, early in the third quarter, but the fightin
Wolverines lived up to their name and fought back to even terr
by tallying in the early secon
[IPII nl r oIuCof the fourth quarter.

throughout America.
His prominence in thez
has resulted in a wealth

radio field
of experi-

Horowitz has had a career start-'
ing back in Kiev, Russia, where he
studied in one of the famous con-
servatories there and culminating
now in continued triumphal tours
of this country and foreign lands.
He is but 24 years old.
The Detroit Symphony orchestra
is one of the youngest organizations
of its kind in the United States.
The first season of the group as a
very small orchestra was in 1914.
Public opinion for a bigger and fin-
er orchestra grew greater and
greater so that in 1917 definite
strides were made under the lead-
ership of Ossip Gabrilowistch.
Given Free Hand
He was then given practically a
free hand in directing the affairs
and formation of the orchestra and
it has been through his guidance
that the orchestra has expanded to
its present state.
About that time, enthusiasm over
the orchestra ran high and the
well known Orchestra hall was built
at a cost of more than $1,000,000,
and dedicated to symphony music.
. At present the orchestra boasts
many soloists of international fame.
Every one of the players have rep-
utations as players of exceptional,
ability and great care is exercised
in selecting the personnel of the
group.
0 0
1 THE BIG TEN STANDINGS j

ences jammed clear through with I
human interest, and these are the
things he talks about when he
makes a personal appearance.
In addition to his speaking abil-
ities, McNamee is noted as a mu-
sician, and his rich baritone voice
is often heard by his radio audi-
ence. It is planned to have him
render several selections on the
program Wednesday night.
Seats for the second lecture at
$1.00 each may be obtained at
Slater's book store, the office of the
Oratorical association in 3211 An-
gell hall, or at the box office in Hill
auditorium which will open at 7
o'clock the night of the lecture. Al-
though the season reserved seats
have been sold out, there are many
single admission seats to be placed
on sale. The entire right section of
the main floor and a part of the
balcony is kept open for the hold-
ers of these general admission
tickets.
FRENCH PARTIES FAIL
TO REACH AGREEMENT1

ON WEDNESDAY NIGHT

TO BEGIN_ WEDNESDAY
University And State Industrial
Life Unified By New Theme
Offered In Year Book
CHRONICLESCOLLEGE LIFE:
A campus sale of the 1929 Michi-
ganensian, the forthcoming issue of
which will be- ready in the spring,
will take place the latter part of
the week. This year the 'Ensian
wily embody many new features on
a larger and grander scale than
ever have been before been present-
ed in a University of Michigan year-
book. The theme "Michigan In-
dustries" will unify the book into
one.
The choice of the theme, "Mich-
igan Industries," is especially signi-
ficant, considering the aims of the
Michiganensian editors. With the
end in view of a 'bigger and better'
Michiganensian, the University
yearbook, or "review of reviews,"
staff will attempt to show how
closely the University is connected
with the industrial and agricultural
life of the state.
Every branch of activity which
characterizes the state will be A,.
lustrated in colors on the various
division pages. Aside from being
different in theme from any other
'Ensian heretofore published, it will,
be interesting, forming a back-
ground in chronicling University
life.
Editorial work on the annual be-
gan last June with the filing of
pictures of the University and itsi
activities, and those that finally
appear in the book will represent
the selection of few from the hun-
dreds that were actually taken.
There will be several novel page
treatments, entirely modern in ex-
ecution and showing by means of.
illustrations and write-ups how
closely the University is linked
with the state at large. Especially
attractive in photographic artistry
will be . a phototone view section
appearing in the front of the book.

EVENLY MATEAMS FIGH'
TO 6-6 DRAW AS LARGE CROWI

(By Associated Press)
PARIS, Nov. 10.-The new
French government will probably
not be ready to participate tomor-
row in the tenth anniversary of
the Armistice. Raymond Poincare
continued his efforts to induce an
agreement between parties which
would enable him to form a coali-
tion cabinet but the result was ap-
parently in as much doubt as when
he submitted his resignation.
The radical party is still the
stickler, its leaders informing Poin-
care that they would not author-
ize their members to enter a cabi-
net with any representatives of the
union republican, the moderate
crowd is second in strength of all
the groups in the chamber.
The cabinet's efforts of the radi-
cal and socialistic parties to reor-
ganize the left bloc which support-
ed Edouard Herriot have thus far.
failed of developments.

After the teams had completeC
their preliminary drills, the Marine
band of 70 pieces and the Navy
drum and bugle corps put in. their
appearance and the regimento- f
blue-clad Middy rooters filed into
the open end of the stadium and
across the field to their cheering
section. Between th halves the:
featured the cheering activities b:
their spirited singing "Anchor
Aweigh" and "I Want to go Back
to Michigan."
The opening quarter resolved it
self into a punting duel with Sim-
rall, the diminutive Wolverine half
back, more than holding his own
with Big Bob Bowstrom, touted
Navy kicker. One of Simrall's kick'
rolled to the Navy 10-yard marl
where it was downed by a Michi
gan player. The first downs wer
even, each team netting one.
Navy found herself in the second
quarter, however, and carried th
fight into Wolverine territory fo
STATISTICS
Yards from scrimmage: Michi-
gan 134 Navy 129.
IFirst downs: Michigan 7;
Navy 8 (by rushing), 2 by passes.
Passes: Michigan, 5 incom-
plete,N1 complete for a 4-yard
loss; Navy; 4 incomplete, 3 com-
Splete for 30 yards, 1 intercepted.
Punts: Michigan 14, for aver-
I age of 35 yards; Navy 12, for
average of 36 yards.
I Penalties: Michigan 30 yards;
Navy 15 yards.
v'
the greater part of the 15 minutes
unleashing a stinging running of
fense.
Gannon, Castree and Clifto
pooled their ability to advantag
and ripped through the Michiga
wall with alarming success, bt
only once did the Middies get with
in striking distance of the Wol
verines' final chalk mark. Welchi
caught Simrall's punt on Michi
gan's own 40-yard line, and the
passed. to Moret for 4 yards. Cas
tree hit his own right tackle for
first down.
Castree slipped by Michigan
right tackle for a gain of fot
yards, and Clifton plunged throug
the same hole for another firs
down on the Maize and Blue 14
yard mark. Here the Wolverine
braced and three line plays nette
only six yards. Bill Bauer droppe
back to the 20-yard line and al
(Continued On Page Six)
Chicago Is Defeated
By Cardinal Elever
(By Associated Press)
MADISON, Wis., Nov. 10.-Wis
consin went into a virtual tie fo
first place with Iowa today b
swamping Chicago, its tradition:
rival, 25 to 0, before 42,000 spec
tators, the largest home-comir
c rowdu in its historv sat CfliRnn ~

Iowa...........
Wisconsin.....
Ohio State .....
Illinois ........
Minnesota .....
Northwestern .
Purdue ........
Michigan......

. 3
. 2
. 3
. 2
. 3
.. 2
.. 1
,. 1

0
0
1
1
2
2
2
3

0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
n'

1.000
1.000
.750
.666
.600
.500
.333
.250
C '

FOOTBALL

SCORES

I

Indiana Overpowered
By Minnesota Backs'
(By Associated Press)
Minneapolis, Nov. 10.-Minneso-
ta's hard-hitting backs stepped out
on a dry field today and crashed
through and around Indiana to
win, 21 to 12. The Gopher line
smashing tactics were superior to
the aerial thrust of the Hoosiers.

DR. LITTLE ISSUES
LAUDING ALU
(Special To The Daily)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 10-Expres-
sing his complete satisfaction and
pleasure at the provision of $12,000
for the Alumni Fellowships by the
Regents, President Clarence Cook
Little issued the following state-
ment today.
| "Michigan has taken a step
which seems to me of outstanding
importance as the first sign of a
new era in the relationship between

iIn iana..............1 30 .2)u
Chicago.........0 4 0 .000 j
v o
STATEMENT
IMNI FELLOWSHIPS
ple of the State are more or less
familiar with the idea of the Alum-
ni university which aims to provide
a Unversty type of organization to
Michigan alumni and former stu-
dents so that their intellectual in-,
terests may be recognized, nurtured
and applied to the problems and
welfare of the University. The Uni-
versity on her part is to provide to'
the alumnus and former students
aid and guidance in enriching and
in developing the intellectual in-

Minnesota, 21; Indiana, 12.
Illinois, 14; Butler, 0.
Iowa, 14; Ohio State, 7.
Wisconsin, 25; Chicago, 0.
Northwestern, 7; Purdue, 6.
Iowa "B", 13; Notre Dame "B", 0.
North Dakota, 6; South Dakota,
0.
Illinois "B", 30; Wisconsin "B", 0.
Notre Dame, 12; Army, 6.
St. Bonaventure, 0; Cornell, 0.
Maine, 26; Bowdoin, 0.
Princeton, 25; Washington and
Lee, 12.
Colgate, 21; Hobart, 0.
Columbia, 14; Johns Hokins, 13.
Pennsylvania, 7; Harvard, 0.
Carnegie Tech, 13; Georgetown,
Pittsburgh, 25; Washington and
Jefferson, 0.
New York U., 71; Alfred, 0.
Penn State, 50; George Washing-k
ton, 0.
Bucknell, 40; Lehigh, 0.

In the midst of a triumphant re-
turn to the concert stage, Paul
Whiteman and his orchestra will
play Ann Arbor after an absence
of three years, when he comes to
Hill auditorium on the night of No-
vember 27, for the benefit of the
Women's league. Whiteman re-
cently concluded a tour of the
'Paramount theaters on which he
received more than any other stage
attraction has ever.
Whiteman, of course, ranks along
with Babe Ruth and Gene Tunney,
as one of the outstanding figures
in modern times. The rotund

Jazz music as anyone. He raised it
from the ragtime stage to a high
plane, it is agreed. Whiteman first
'conceived the .idea of scoring dance
music just as the music of sym-
phonies and chamber music is
done. He strongly denies, however,
the belief that he invented the saxo-
phone. Opening in New York dur-
ing 1924 with the first jazz concert
orchestra ever organized, he forced
New York critics and the public to
accept his new method. Since then,
he has played more than 600 con-
certs in this country and in Eu-
rope.

WHITEMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA
WILL PLAY IN BENEFIT CONCERT

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